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COACHE SURVEY

COACHE is a research initiative that gathers benchmarking data on best practices for faculty recruitment and retention. In fall 2012, RIT participated the COACHE survey and we will repeat the process in 2015-2016. Visit the COACHE website to learn more, including results from the 2012 survey.

Roles in Faculty Mentoring | Faculty Mentoring

What is Mentoring?

The word “mentor” comes to us from Homer’s Odyssey.  Before leaving for the Trojan War, Odysseus asks his friend Mentor to watch over his household and to counsel and protect his son, Telemachus.  Although it is actually the goddess Athena disguised as Mentor who advises the young man, whose father is away for 20 years, it is the mortal whose name has come to stand for a trusted counselor and tutor.

Today, we think of mentors less as teachers than confidants, encouragers, supporters—in a word, friends.  Mentors and protégés (or, more recently, mentees) are partners in an extended project of growth, development, and self-discovery.  To this collaboration mentors bring wisdom and experience to guide protégés as they navigate unfamiliar territory.  Mentees contribute youthful energy, ambition, and new ideas.  The result is a mutually gratifying give and take.

In the best of these partnerships the mentee gains a role model, while the mentor experiences rejuvenation and the deep satisfaction, as well as vicarious thrill, of watching a career take off (Scanlon, P. 2015).

Overview of Faculty Mentoring

Mentoring has long been recognized as an effective method for new faculty to learn the basic knowledge, skills, attitudes and behaviors for teaching and especially for learning about institution-specific norms (Ensher, Thomas and Murphy 2001). 

A mentoring network is based on the premise that no single individual possesses all of the experience and expertise that a new faculty member needs to plan and develop a successful career. New faculty at RIT are encouraged to also develop a constellation of “mentoring partners” who assist each other in nonhierarchical, collaborative partnerships - each contributing according to her/his own knowledge and experience. This mentoring model can be both broader and more flexible than the traditional model, able to provide "just in time" advice and guidance (Sorcinelli and Yun 2007).

Faculty Mentoring Roles

Mentees

  • Openly seek advice from mentors.
  • Clarify expectations from dean, department heads, and current mentors.
  • Obtain current tenure and promotion guidelines from the dean’s office in your College.
  • Willingly participate in developmental activities.
  • Form an individual mentoring network.

Mentors

  • Help less experienced faculty members (mentees) develop in specified capacities (teaching, research, scholarship, service, etc.).
  • Provide career advancement advice.
  • Offer support.

Department Heads or Immediate Supervisors

  • Provide a comprehensive orientation for new faculty.
  • Identify individuals to serve as mentors.
  • Help match mentees with mentors.
  • Manage Plans of Work to reflect mentoring-related activities and responsibilities.
  • Provide performance feedback and guidance to faculty.

Provost and Deans

  • Through the shared governance model, administer and interpret guidelines for tenure.
  • Set guidelines for scholarly productivity.
  • Establish a set of rewards and accountability measures to ensure that mentoring remains a priority.