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Michael Ruhling, editorial director, has taught courses in music history and appreciation at Rochester Institute of Technology, and conducted the RIT Orchestra, since 1998.  He has also taught courses at the Eastman School of Music, Goshen College, Huntington College, and The Catholic University of America.  From 2004 to 2009 Ruhling served on the conducting and lecture faculty of the Classical Music Festival held each August in Eisenstadt, Austria.  Publications include Johann Peter Salomon's Scores of Four Haydn Symphonies: Edition with Commentary, and an essay on the symphonies of Michael Haydn for The Symphonic Repertoire, Vol. 1: The Eighteenth Century Symphony (forthcoming, Indiana University Press). He was named the 2008-2009 Christopher Hogwood Historically Informed Performance Fellow by the Boston Handel and Haydn Society.  Ruhling is the first president of the Haydn Society of North America, is a member of the Haydn Society of Great Britain's Committee of Honour, and recently served as secretary-treasurer of the Society for Eighteenth Century Music.

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Peter Alexander holds a Ph.D. in musicology from Indiana University, where he studied with A. Peter Brown. He contributed the essay on Carlos von Ordonez for Volume I: The Eighteenth-Century Symphony of Brown’s Symphonic Repertoire series, due for publication later in 2011. He has written reviews for Notes and Journal of Musicological Research, and he has written and presented lectures on Antonin Dvořák’s visit to Spillville, Iowa. He has been editor of the newsletter of the AMS Midwest Chapter, the national AMS and the Haydn Society of North America. Now retired from the University of Iowa, he lives in Colorado, where he is the free-lance classical music writer for Boulder Weekly.

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Allan Badley is a Senior Lecturer at The University of Auckland’s School of Music, and a specialist in late 18th-century Viennese music. His publications include several hundred scholarly editions of works by major contemporaries of Haydn, Mozart and Beethoven, including works for piano and orchestra by Ferdinand Ries, mass settings by Wanhal and Hummel and an extensive series of symphonies and concertos. He has published articles on Leopold Hofmann, Ignaz Pleyel and Haydn, contributed to the Oxford Composer Companion, and contributed analytical essays on the symphonies of Wagenseil and Pleyel for the forthcoming volume on the eighteenth-century symphony edited by Barthia Churgin and Mary Sue Morrow for Indiana University Press. He is co-founder of Artaria Editions. In 2007 Badley was awarded the Goldene-Pleyel-Medaille of the Internationale Ignaz Joseph Pleyel Gesellschaft (Austria). He is a member of the editorial board of Eighteenth-Century Music and was recently elected inaugural president of the Swiss-based Johann Baptist Wanhal Society.

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Tom Beghin is an internationally active performer on historical keyboards.  His recording of Haydn’s complete works for solo keyboard (The Virtual Haydn, Naxos NBD 0001-04) was hailed as “one of the most audacious recording enterprises in recent memory” and won a 2011 Juno nomination for “Best Music DVD of the Year.” As a scholar he has published in major musicological journals and volumes, and has co-edited Haydn and the Performance of Rhetoric (Chicago, 2007; winner of the 2009 AMS Ruth A. Solie Award).  His research interests revolve around questions of rhetoric, persona, gender, and instrument technology in the 18th and early 19th centuries.  He has been a member of the Haydn-Institut (Cologne) since 2004 and serves on the board of directors of CIRMMT (Centre for Interdisciplinary Research in Music Media and Technology, Montreal).  After earning a doctorate from Cornell University, he joined the faculty at UCLA, and, since 2003, has been Associate Professor at the Schulich School of Music of McGill University, where he teaches music history, performance practice, and fortepiano.

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Edward Green, whose NYU doctoral thesis dealt with chromatic completion in the late vocal music of Haydn and Mozart, is an award-winning composer. His Piano Concertino was nominated for a Grammy in 2010. Since 1984, he has been on the faculty of Manhattan School of Music, teaching both composition and music history, and also courses in ethnomusicology. A Fulbright Senior Specialist in American Music, who in the summer of 2010 taught a doctoral seminar in Buenos Aires on the music of John Cage, Dr. Green’s publications range from Marcabru and Guido d’Arrezo to Prokofiev, Richard Rodgers, Giancinto Scelsi and Harry Partch. Along with his writings on chromatic completion in the music of the Classical Era, Dr. Green is best known in musicological circles for his studies of Duke Ellington, and of such contemporary Chinese composers as Zhou Long.

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David Wyn Jones has been on the faculty of the Cardiff University School of Music since 1974.  He was awarded a Professorial Chair in 2007 and became Head of School in March 2008. His main interest lies in the music of the Classical Period, in particular Haydn, Beethoven and Vienna, and in aspects of music dissemination and publishing. He was a member of the core group for the international project, ‘The Circulation of Music, 1600-1900’, sponsored by the European Science Foundation (2000-04).  He is on the Editorial Board of the journal Eighteenth-Century Music and the e-journal HAYDN.  His book The Oxford Composer Companions: Haydn was awarded a prize by the International Association of Music Librarians (UK and Ireland) in 2002. He has been chairman of the Music Libraries Trust since 2005, is a Trustee of RISM (UK) and was elected a Vice President of the Royal Musical Association in 2009. He has given public lectures and talks at the BBC Proms, Edinburgh Festival, Royal Festival Hall and other major venues.

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János Malina has been president of the Hungarian Haydn Society since 1996.  He has been the principal organizer and music director of the Haydn at Eszterháza Music Festival, a board members of the Sopron Early Music Days Festival and the Hungarian Music Council, vice president of the Réseau Européenne de Musique Ancienne, and editor-in-chief of Editio Musica Budapest.  His most recent scholarly activities have focused on opera performance at Eszterháza.  He serves as president of the International Opera Foundation Eszterháza, and last fall delivered the paper “Haydn’s Workshop: The Second Opera House at Eszterháza” at the American Musicological Society annual meeting.  Malina, along with Ferenc Dávid, Carston Jung, and Edward McCue, has been exploring the archival materials associated with the second Eszterháza opera house, uncovering information about the architecture, sets, costumes, and other production concerns at Eszterháza.

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Denis McCaldin is a conductor and musicologist. He is Director of the Haydn Society of Great Britain and Professor Emeritus of Performance Studies in Music at Lancaster University.  He has conducted many major British orchestras, specializing in choral and chamber orchestral music of the 18th and 20th centuries.   He has also edited a number of Haydn's works and one of his CDs (featuring his edition of the Little Organ Mass) has received a Gramophone Critic's Choice award.  He is also an experienced broadcaster for the BBC.

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Mary Sue Morrow Professor of Musicology at the University of Cincinnati, received her Ph.D. in Musicology from Indiana University. Her publications include Concert Life in Haydn’s Vienna: Aspects of a Developing Musical and Social Institution (1989), German Music Criticism in the Late Eighteenth Century: Aesthetic Issues in Instrumental Music (1997), and articles in various journals and books, including Oxford Composer Companions: Haydn (2002), and The Cambridge Companion to the Symphony (in press). Currently she is co-editing (with Bathia Churgin) a book entitled The Eighteenth-Century Symphony, which will appear as the first volume of The Symphonic Repertoire published by Indiana University Press.

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Nancy November is a senior lecturer at the University of Auckland.  Her research and teaching interests centre on the music of the late eighteenth century:  aesthetics, analysis, and performance history and practices.  She has published review articles in MLA Notes and in the Critical Forum of Music Analysis.  Recent Haydn-related publications include essays on Haydn and musical melancholy (Eighteenth-Century Music, 2007), Haydn’s compositional use of register in the strings quartets (Music Analysis, 2008), and “voice” in Haydn’s early string quartets (Music and Letters, 2008).  An edition of Adalbert Gyrowetz’s String Quartets Op. 29 is forthcoming from Steglein Publishing, and an edition of Paul Wranitzky’s Six Sextets is forthcoming from A-R Editions.  She is currently working on a book on Beethoven’s middle period string quartets.

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Walter Reicher is the artistic director of the Eisenstadt Haydn Days.







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Christine Siegert is a Junior Professor in musicology & gender studies at the University of the Arts in Berlin. After a PhD on the Italian operas of Luigi Cherubini, she held research positions at the University of Würzburg, the Joseph Haydn-Institute, Cologne, and the University of Bayreuth. She is co-editor of the Eisenstädter Haydn-Berichte with Walter Reicher and a member of the HAYDN editorial board.

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Elaine Sisman is the Anne Parsons Bender Professor of Music at Columbia University, where she has taught since 1982.  The author of Haydn and the Classical Variation, Mozart: The 'Jupiter' Symphony, and editor of Haydn and His World, she specializes in music of the 18th and 19th centuries. Her most recent scholarly activities have covered an array of topics such biography (Haydn and his multiple audiences), chronology (Mozart’s “Haydn” quartets), history (marriage in Don Giovanni), Enlightenment aesthetics (Haydn’s Creation), and the opus concept (“Six of One”), and she is completing studies of Haydn’s Metastasio opera L’isola disabitata and of music and melancholy. She served a term as President of the American Musicological Society, and has been awarded grants from the National Endowment for the Humanities and the American Council of Learned Societies, and the American Musicological Society (Alfred Einstein Award). She serves on the board of directors of the Joseph Haydn-Institut in Cologne, the Akademie für Mozartforschung in Salzburg, and the Haydn Society of North America, and as associate editor of The Musical Quarterly.

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