Academics & Programs

Concentrations

This information is only for students who matriculated into a RIT program prior to Fall 2012. All other students should consult the information under "Immersions." If you have any questions, please contact your advisor.

African Studies

College of Liberal Arts, Office of Student Services
(585) 475-2444, libarts@rit.edu

The African studies concentration provides students with a broad understanding of the African people and their histories, societies, and cultures from pre-colonial times to the post-colonial period and the contemporary neo-liberal era. The concentration allows students to critically analyze the social worlds of Africa and reverberations for the African Diaspora by examining cultures, societies, and histories from multiple perspectives and by analyzing changing and competing interpretations of issues, events, and political issues in African societies.

ElectivesChoose three of the following:
0510-486 Globalizing Africa
0510-487 African Popular Cultures
0510-460 Genocide and Post-Conflict Justice
0515-482 African American Culture
0524-420 Introduction to African Studies
0524-421 African Slave Trade

American Artistic Experience

College of Liberal Arts, Office of Student Services
(585) 475-2444, libarts@rit.edu

This concentration provides students with the opportunity to study the American artistic experience in a variety of arts, including painting, architecture, film, photography, music, theater, and mass media. Each course will present American art within the context of the broader current of American life, including its history, philosophy, social, and cultural traditions.

Electives–Choose three of the following:
0505-442 Music in the United States
0505-443 Images of American Life
0505-444 American Painting
0505-445 Issues in American Art
0505-446 American Film of the Studio Era
0505-447 American Musical
0505-448 20th Century American Music
0505-452 Special Topics in American Art*
0505-453 Theater in the United States
0505-454 Orchestra Repertoire and History
0505-455 Survey of Jazz
0505-457 Contemporary Drama, Theater, and Media
0505-463 Survey of African-American Music
0505-464 Blues as Personal and Social Commentary
0505-467 American Film Since the 1960s
0505-470 American Popular Song 1830-1950
0505-471 American Popular and Rock Music
0505-488 Special Topics in American Theater*
0505-491 Traumatic Images
0505-500 African-American Art
0505-504 Memory, Memorials, and Monuments
0505-505 Art in the Age of the New Deal
0505-506 Museums of Art and Design
0505-507 Landscapes Transformed
0505-516 Queer Looks

* Topics will vary.

American Politics

College of Liberal Arts, Office of Student Services
(585) 475-2444, libarts@rit.edu

The value in studying the American political system can scarcely be overemphasized. As Thomas Jefferson maintained, only an educated and enlightened democracy can endure. A democratic society remains valid only to the extent that its citizens are educated and well-informed about their government and issues of public policy. The purpose of this concentration is to give students a sound understanding of the U.S. political system. Courses detail various aspects of the American political system, giving students the tools to participate effectively in the political process.

Electives–Choose three of the following:
0508-484 Environmental Policy
0513-425 Politics and the Life Sciences
0513-426 Cyberpolitics
0513-427 Evolutionary International Relations
0513-428 Evolution and the Law
0513-429 Primate Politics
0513-449 Special Topics in Political Science
0513-450 State and Local Politics
0513-451 The Congress
0513-452 The American Presidency
0513-453 American Foreign Policy
0513-454 Political Parties and Voting
0513-455 Politics and Public Policy
0513-456 The Judicial Process
0513-457 Constitutional Law
0513-458 American Political Thought
0513-460 Constitutional Rights and Liberties
0513-462 Abraham Lincoln and American Democracy
0513-463 First Amendment, Liberty, and Deliberative Democracy
0513-465 Modern Constitutionalism, Liberty, and Equality
0513-466 Political Leadership
0513-481 Women in Politics
0513-485 Politics through Fiction
0513-514 Political Theory

Archaeology

College of Liberal Arts, Office of Student Services
(585) 475-2444, libarts@rit.edu

Archaeology is the study of the human past by means of the physical residues of past human behavior: for example, poetry, stone and metal tools, and the remains of ancient dwelling sites. The archaeologist explains how human society has changed and developed over time using such physical evidence. Archaeology employs techniques from the physical sciences to build a more detailed picture of the human past. Students explore the worlds of the past through hands-on applications of physical science techniques in a diverse range of fields, including chemistry, metallurgy, biology, and material science, applying these disciplines in a novel and challenging context.

Electives–Choose three of the following:
0510-455 Special Topics
0510-465 Social and Cultural Theory
0510-485 Exploring Ancient Technology
0510-502 Archaeology and the Human Past
0510-506 Great Discoveries in Archaeology
0510-507 Archaeological Science
0510-508 Archaeology of Cities
0510-509 Survey of Metallurgy
0510-511 Field Methods in Archaeology
0510-512 Garbage Archaeology

Art History

College of Liberal Arts, Office of Student Services
(585) 475-2444, libarts@rit.edu

The art history concentration is the study of art history across a broad period of historical time and geographical space. The variety of specialized courses allows students to gain insight into the artistic contributions of Europe, Asia, and the developing world. The concentration includes several liberal arts courses and some upper-division specialty art history courses. This concentration is offered as an alternative to the American artistic experience concentration, specifically designed for those students who wish to acquire a broader understanding of art and culture outside of the United States.

ElectivesChoose three of the following:
0505-421 Introduction to Museums and Collecting
0505-422 Art Materials: Panel Printing
0505-423 Art Materials: Photography
0505-424 Legal and Ethical Issues for Collecting Institutions
0505-425 Display and Exhibition Design
0505-436 Women’s Stories and Films
0505-437 The Forensic Investigation of Art
0505-438 Conservation of Cultural Material
0505-443 Images of American Life
0505-444 American Painting
0505-445 Issues in American Art
0505-446 American Film of the Studio Era
0505-452 Special Topics*
0505-467 American Film Since the 1960s
0505-468 Art of India and Southeast Asia
0505-469 Art of China, Korea, and Japan
0505-480 Women and the Visual Arts
0505-487 Special Topics: Art of Islam†
0505-491 Traumatic Images
0505-500 African-American Art
0505-504 Memory, Memorials, and Monuments
0505-505 Art in the Age of the New Deal
0505-506 Museums of Art and Design
0505-507 Landscape Transformed
0505-516 Queer Looks

* Special Topics (0505-452) may include the following topics: American Architecture, Queer Looks I, Queer Looks II, Harlem Renaissance, Visual Culture, Reading Images, Traumatic Images, and Art of Dying.

† Special Topics: Art of Islam (0505-487) may include the following topics: Persian/Turkish/Mughal Traditions and Arabic Tradition.

Communication

College of Liberal Arts, Office of Student Services
(585) 475-2444, libarts@rit.edu

This concentration provides opportunities for the advanced study of selected areas of communication. Topics include an overview of the fields of persuasion, mass communications, public speaking, and small group communication. Students will understand and apply several modes of communication in academic, professional, and personal situations. Students are encouraged to complete Human Communication (0535-480) before enrolling in other concentration courses. This concentration is closed to students enrolled in the following degree programs: professional and technical communication, advertising and public relations, and journalism.

ElectivesChoose three of the following:
0535-414 Interpersonal Communication
0535-480 Human Communication
0535-481 Persuasion
0535-482 Mass Communications
0535-483 Small Group Communication
0535-501 Public Speaking
0535-520 Intercultural Communication

Criminal Justice

College of Liberal Arts, Office of Student Services
(585) 475-2444, libarts@rit.edu

A concentration in criminal justice provides students with the appropriate foundation to analyze crime, crime control policy, and the role of the criminal justice system in the maintenance of order in society. Courses focus on the social definition and measurement of crime; the broad understanding of the causes of crime; and the societal response to crime through the police, courts, and corrections. The concentration further introduces students to the body of theory and research necessary to examine the effects and effectiveness of the criminal justice process. This concentration is closed to students enrolled in the criminal justice degree program.

Required Course:
0501-400 Criminology

ElectivesChoose two of the following:
0501-405 Major Issues in the Criminal Justice System
0501-406 Technology in Criminal Justice
0501-415 Domestic Violence
0501-440 Juvenile Justice
0501-441 Corrections
0501-443 Law Enforcement in Society
0501-444 Concepts in Criminal Law
0501-445 Minority Groups and the Criminal Justice System
0501-446 Women and Crime
0501-456 Courts
0501-507 Computer Crime
0501-511 Alternatives to Incarceration
0501-517 Comparative Criminal Justice Systems
0501-518 Crime and Justice in the Community
0501-522 Victimless Crime
0501-523 Crime and Violence

Deaf Studies

Matt Searls, Concentration Adviser
(585) 286-4657, jmsdhd@rit.edu

Cindy Sanders, Concentration Adviser
(585) 286-5149, casnss@rit.edu

This concentration provides students who are fluent in American Sign Language (ASL) with the opportunity to study deaf culture from various perspectives.

Prerequisite: Proficiency in ASL is required for American Sign Language Literature (0525-595, 0504/0525-400) and Structure of American Sign Language (0525-496). Therefore, only students with ASL proficiency (not beginning or intermediate level skills) will be able to declare this concentration. Evening students may not declare this concentration.

ElectivesChoose three courses from the following groups:

Choose one of the following linguistics courses:
0525-385 Linguistics of ASL
0525-386 American Sign Language Literature
0525-391 American Sign Language II
0525-596 Special Topics: DST

Choose two of the following culture courses:
0504-545 Deaf American Literature
0507-463 American Deaf History
0507-473 European Deaf History
0507-476 Diversity in the Deaf Culture
0507-477 Oppression in Lives of Deaf People
0515-452 Special Topics: Diversity in the Deaf Community
0515-529 Deaf Culture in America

Economics

College of Liberal Arts, Office of Student Services
(585) 475-2444, libarts@rit.edu

Economics is the study of human behavior in the allocation of scarce resources to production and the distribution of production among the members of society. The study of economics has taken on increasing importance as we realize that so many of the world's problems, including energy, overpopulation, and global pollution, have an economic basis. The purpose of the economics concentration is to apply tools of economic analysis to a variety of study areas. Note: The economics concentration is closed to students enrolled in the economics degree program.

Prerequisite:
0511-211 Principles of Microeconomics

Electives–Choose three of the following:
0511-402 Principles of Macroeconomics†
0511-440 Urban Economics
0511-441 Economics of Human Resources
0511-442 Contemporary International Economic Problems
0511-443 Current American Macroeconomics Problems
0511-444 Public Finance
0511-445 Survey of Economic Thought
0511-448 Economics of Less Developed Countries
0511-449 Comparative Economic Systems
0511-450 Benefit-Cost Analysis
0511-452 Monetary Analysis and Policy
0511-453 Intermediate Microeconomic Theory
0511-454 International Trade and Finance
0511-455 Intermediate Macroeconomic Theory
0511-456 Industrial Organization
0511-457 Applied Econometrics*
0511-458 Economic Forecasting*
0511-459 Managerial Economics
0511-460 Mathematical Methods: Economics*
0511-461 Seminar in Applied Economics
0511-464 Game Theory with Economic Applications
0511-466 Health Care Economics
0511-480 Economic Role of Women
0511-481 Environmental Economics
0511-484 Natural Resource Economics
0511-571 Honors Seminar in Economics

* Introductory calculus and statistics are additional prerequisites for these courses.

† It is recommended that students take Principles of Macroeconomics (0511-402) as their first course before beginning the concentration.

Environmental Studies

College of Liberal Arts, Office of Student Services
(585) 475-2444, libarts@rit.edu

The environmental studies concentration is an examination of the basic environmental problems we face, how environmental resource depletion and energy issues are related, and what kind of environmental ethics and/or values we have today and have had in the past. The concentration also explores the economic, legislative, and regulatory framework within which most environmental decisions are made. Since most technological areas are associated with significant environmental implications, it is essential that students have an understanding of, and a well-thought-out value orientation about, such environmental consequences.

Electives–Choose three of the following:
0507-464 Environmental Disasters in American History
0508-443 Face of the Land
0508-460 Environment and Society
0508-463 Great Lakes I
0508-464 Great Lakes II‡‡
0508-482 Energy and the Environment
0508-483 Environmental Values
0508-484 Environmental Policy
0508-487 Special Topics: Environmental Studies†
0508-488 History of Ecology and Environmentalism
0508-489 History of the Environmental Sciences
0508-490 Biodiversity and Society
0508-491 Sustainable Communities
0508-500 Science, Technology, and Society Classics
0508-520 Historical Perspectives on Science and Technology Seminar*
0508-530 Seminar in Science, Technology, and the Environment††
0508-540 Science and Technology Policy Seminar‡
0508-570 Environmental Studies Seminar§
0509-453 Environmental Philosophy
0510-449 Sustainable Development
0511-481 Environmental Economics**
0511-484 Natural Resource Economics**
0515-449 Population and Society§§
0521-451 Energy Policy

* Prerequisite: any two of the history of science or technology courses approved by the department

† Topics will vary.

‡ Prerequisite courses: Science and Technology Policy (0508-441), Environmental Policy (0508-484), or Foundations of Public Policy (0521-400)

§ Prerequisite: Two environmental studies electives

** Prerequisite course: Principles of Microeconomics (0511-211)

†† Prerequisite: Any two science, technology, and society courses

‡‡ Prerequisite: Great Lakes I (0508-463)

§§ Prerequisite: Cultural Anthropology (0510-210), Foundations of Sociology (0515-210) or equivalent

Global Justice and Peace Studies

College of Liberal Arts, Office of Student Services
(585) 475-2444, libarts@rit.edu

The global justice and peace studies concentration examines attempts to effect lasting accord and social justice on the international scale. Courses in philosophy, social sciences, and literature help students to understand concepts of human rights, world poverty, and global solidarity. The goal of the concentration is to elucidate the link between concepts of peace and justice while assessing non-violent means of conflict resolution. Note: Evening students may not declare this concentration.

Electives—Choose three of the following:*
0504-319 Arts of Expression: To Make Peace
0509-445 Social and Political Philosophy
0509-446 Philosophy of Law
0509-447 Contemporary Moral Problems
0509-448 The Philosophy of Peace
0509-476 Ethical Theory
0510-459 Cultural Images, War, and Terror
0513-453 American Foreign Policy
0513-488 War and the State
0513-491 Politics of the Middle East

* With approval from the global justice and peace studies adviser, certain Special Topics or Great Thinkers courses may also satisfy the requirements for this concentration.

Global Studies

College of Liberal Arts, Office of Student Services
(585) 475-2444, libarts@rit.edu

The global studies concentration offers courses in economics, history, and political science. While some courses focus on the comparative economic and political systems of the world, others emphasize the development of modern states through studying their social, intellectual, and institutional systems. Finally, other courses examine relations among the states of the world. The purpose of this concentration is to provide students with an opportunity to develop a global perspective to examine the economic, political, historical, and diplomatic aspects of the contemporary world. The concentration further introduces students to the tools to analyze the component parts of the global system, namely the individual countries of which it is comprised. Note: Evening students may not declare this concentration.

Electives—Choose three of the following:
0507-441 Modern U.S. Foreign Relations
0507-446 Europe since 1945 and the European Union
0507-496 African History
0511-448 Economics of Lesser-Developed Countries*
0513-453 American Foreign Policy†
0513-461 Comparative Politics

* Prerequisite: Principles of Microeconomics (0511-211)

† Prerequisite: American Politics (0513-211) or Introduction to International Relations (0513-214)

Globalization

College of Liberal Arts, Office of Student Services
(585) 475-2444, libarts@rit.edu

Networks, flows of people, capital, goods, institutions, ideas, and images all contribute to globalization. This concentration analyzes the formal and informal connections across and beyond conventional borders and among the world's nations. Courses examine how these global connections have been forged, the various dynamic and unpredictable responses of people in diverse locations to global processes, and the implications of global processes for a shared future.

PrerequisiteChoose one of the following:
0515-210 Foundations of Sociology (or equivalent)
0510-210 Cultural Anthropology (or equivalent)
0524-210 Global Studies (or equivalent)

ElectivesChoose three of the following:
0510-440 Cultures in Globalization
0510-443 Immigration to the U.S.
0510-444 Global Economy and the Grassroots
0510-445 Global Cities
0510-447 Anthropology of Mass Media
0510-449 Sustainable Development
0510-451 Global Sexualities
0510-459 Cultural Images of War and Terror
0515-453 Global Exiles of War and Terror
0524-422 Histories of Globalization
0524-449 Special Topics: U.S. Relations with the Arab World
0524-449 Special Topics: Societies of the Modern Middle East 

History

College of Liberal Arts, Office of Student Services
(585) 475-2444, libarts@rit.edu

This concentration offers courses in three major geographic areas: Europe, America, and the Third World. While some courses focus on the internal development of a people through studying their social, intellectual, and institutional growth, others examine international affairs as reflected in the diplomatic relations between countries. Depending on which three courses are selected, the student may aim to achieve a breadth of understanding of various geographic regions and historical approaches or to acquire depth in a more restricted field of study.

Electives—Choose three of the following:
0507-401 American Women: Colonies to 1848
0507-402 American Women: 1848 to Now
0507-410 Terrorism, Intelligence, and War
0507-411 Origins of U.S. Foreign Relations
0507-412 Modern Japan in History, Fiction, and Film
0507-440 U.S. Social and Intellectual History
0507-441 Modern U.S. Foreign Relations
0507-442 Contemporary Middle East
0507-443 European Social and Intellectual History Since 1600
0507-444 Strategy and Diplomacy of Europe
0507-445 Modern Latin American History
0507-446 Europe Since 1945 and the European Union
0507-447 U.S. History Since 1945
0507-448 History of Russia to 1917
0507-449 History of Russia Since 1917
0507-450 Stalin, Mussolini, Hitler
0507-451 History of Rochester
0507-462 The Civil War and Reconstruction
0507-463 American Deaf History
0507-464 Environmental Disasters in American History
0507-465 Survey of African-American History
0507-466 American Slavery, American Freedom
0507-467 American Disability History
0507-468 The United States and Japan
0507-469 Special Topics: History
0507-473 European Deaf History
0507-474 America’s National Parks
0507-475 Hands on History
0507-485 Foundations of Asian Civilizations
0507-486 20th Century China and Japan
0507-487 Communist China
0507-488 Modern Germany
0507-489 Japan in the Modern World
0507-490 History of Mexico
0507-496 African History
0507-497 Biography As History
0510-464 Nationalism and Identity 

International Relations

College of Liberal Arts, Office of Student Services
(585) 475-2444, libarts@rit.edu

The international relations concentration introduces students to the complexities and shifting trends of international affairs, with an opportunity to study the significance of at least one aspect of the international system. We live in an increasingly interdependent world. Many career tracks will carry graduates into the multicultural arena of international transactions, which know no borders. Many emerging problems require international approaches if they are to be managed in the future.

Electives—Choose three of the following:
0507-442 Contemporary Middle East
0507-444 Strategy and Diplomacy of Europe
0507-488 Modern Germany
0513-425 Politics and the Life Sciences
0513-426 Cyberpolitics
0513-427 Evolutionary International Relations
0513-428 Evolution and the Law
0513-429 Primate Politics
0513-441 Politics in China
0513-443 Politics of Russia
0513-446 Politics in Developing Countries
0513-447 Human Rights/Global Perspectives
0513-449 Special Topics in Political Science
0513-453 American Foreign Policy
0513-461 Comparative Politics
0513-467 Modern Korea
0513-484 Government and Politics of Africa
0513-486 Comparative Politics in Latin America
0513-487 International Law and Organization
0513-488 War and the State
0513-489 Terrorism and Political Violence
0513-490 International Political Economy
0513-491 Politics of the Middle East
0513-492 Religion and International Politics
0513-493 Global Politics and the Environment
0513-494 Comparative Public Policy
0513-496 Government and Politics in East Asia

Latino/Latina/Latin American Studies

College of Liberal Arts, Office of Student Services
(585) 475-2444, libarts@rit.edu

The Latino/Latina/Latin American studies concentration enables students to explore the rich social, historical, and cultural heritage in the western hemisphere that emanates from the Caribbean and Central and South America and manifests itself in the history, sociology, anthropology, politics, languages, and literatures of the Latin American countries and the Latino/Latina populations in the United States. While knowledge of Spanish will significantly deepen the student’s cultural understanding, language courses are an option rather than a required component of the concentration. Students may opt to complete the concentration with two elective courses and one language course or three elective courses. Note: Evening students may not declare this concentration.

Electives—Choose up to three of the following:†
0504-435 Global Literature: Latin American Literature
0504-447 Special Topics: Magical Realism
0504-469 American Literature: Latino
0504-479 Latino Experience in Literature
0510-442 Cultures and Politics in Latin America
0510-444 Global Economy and the Grassroots
0525-573 Women in the Hispanic World: Politics of Identity Formation
0525-576 Trauma and Survival in the First-Person Narrative
0525-577 Screening the Hispanic Caribbean
0525-579 Special Topics*

* Special Topics (0525-579) may include the following: The Caribbean and Globalization and Cuban Film: Cultural and National Identity.

† With department approval: CIAS Art History: Latin American Art History I, II, plus one additional credit per course.

One of the following Spanish or Portuguese language courses may be used for this concentration. The student should consult with the concentration adviser for placement at the proper level.
0525-521 Beginning Portuguese II
0525-522 Beginning Portuguese III
0525-523 Intermediate Portuguese I
0525-524 Intermediate Portuguese II
0525-525 Intermediate Portuguese III
0525-526 Advanced Portuguese I
0525-527 Advanced Portuguese II
0525-528 Advanced Portuguese III
0525-561 Beginning Spanish II
0525-562 Beginning Spanish III
0525-563 Intermediate Spanish I
0525-564 Intermediate Spanish II
0525-565 Intermediate Spanish III
0525-566 Advanced Spanish I
0525-567 Advanced Spanish II
0525-568 Advanced Spanish III

Literary and Cultural Studies

College of Liberal Arts, Office of Student Services
(585) 475-2444, libarts@rit.edu

A concentration in literary and cultural studies offers a variety of approaches to the study of literary and non-literary texts, including but not limited to imaginative fiction, non-fiction, poetry, visual culture, and new media. Those who choose this concentration will have the opportunity to engage such texts through both traditional and contemporary approaches. Students will develop their critical and analytical abilities as they become versed in the formal, contextual, and historical aspects of specific texts. All of the courses offered by the department of English are writing intensive and offer opportunities for sustained writing and communication practice.

Prerequisite:
0502-227 Writing (or equivalent)

Electives—Choose three of the following:
0502-463 Language and Brain
0504/0525-400 American Sign Language Literature
0504-425 Great Authors
0504-435 Global Literature
0504-436 The Graphic Novel
0504-440 Drama and Theater
0504-441 The Art of Poetry
0504-442 The Short Story
0504-443 The Novel
0504-444 Film as Literature
0504-447 Special Topics
0504-448 Biographical Literature
0504-454 Shakespeare: Tragedy and Romance
0504-455 Shakespeare: Comedies and Histories
0504-460 Modern Poetry
0504-462 Literature and Technology
0504-464 Mythology and Folklore
0504-465 Viking Myth and Saga
0504-467 African American Literature
0504-469 American Literature
0504-474 Studies in British Literature
0504-476 Immigrant Voices in American Literature
0504-479 Latino Experience in Literature
0504-480 Women’s Studies in Language and Literature
0504-482 Science Fiction
0504-545 Deaf American Literature

Material Cultural Studies

College of Liberal Arts, Office of Student Services
(585) 475-2444, libarts@rit.edu

A concentration in material cultural studies allows students to study the resources and technologies that convert natural and man-made materials into cultural objects. Archaeological and art conservation science integrate chemistry, engineering, art, and anthropology in order to investigate methods and materials from the past. This concentration includes courses from a broad range of topics with laboratory components such as archeological science, forensic investigation of art, ancient metallurgy, art conservation, and the technology of organic and inorganic materials.

Electives—Choose three of the following:
0510-446 Native North Americans
0510-507 Archaeological Science
0510-508 Archaeology of Cities
0510-509 Survey of Metallurgy
0510-511 Field Methods in Archaeology
0526-441 GIS Applications
0533-437 The Forensic Investigation of Art
0533-438 Introduction to Art Conservation 

Minority Relations in the United States

College of Liberal Arts, Office of Student Services
(585) 475-2444, libarts@rit.edu

A concentration in minority relations in the United States offers students a variety of academic perspectives on how groups of people sharing similar characteristics (whether cultural, inherited, or learned) interact with groups sharing different characteristics. The focus of this concentration is on racial and ethnic minorities in the U.S. Courses examine the issues of differential power between groups and analyze the social structures that are used to maintain or alter these power differences. Courses also look at the interpersonal level of response of both majority and minority group members. Finally, the concentration investigates the experience of minority groups in the U.S. Note: Evening students may not declare this concentration.

Required Course:
0515-448 Minority Group Relations

Electives—Choose two of the following:
0504-447 Special Topics: Multicultural Literature
0507-496 African History
0515-482 African-American Culture
0515-483 Hispanic-American Culture
0535-484 Rhetoric of Race Relations

Modern Language and Culture - Arabic

Yukiko Maru, Concentration Adviser
(585) 475-4558, yxmgsl@rit.edu

This concentration will introduce students to the language, customs, and cultural aspects (history, art, literature) of one particular country or area. Students will choose two consecutive language courses beyond the introductory prerequisite language course, as well as one related liberal arts culture course. The goal of this concentration is to raise students’ awareness of the relationship between language and culture and the differences between their own language and culture and those of the country they choose to study.

It is important to note that two out of the three required courses must be taken at RIT. Only one course may be transferred in, if necessary.

Students may not skip or go back to the lower level in the language course sequence. Students with some proficiency in the intended concentration should contact the concentration adviser to take a placement test prior to registration for the first course of the sequence at RIT. These concentrations are closed to native speakers. Evening students may not declare these concentrations.

Prerequisite: Beginning Arabic I (0525-400) or equivalent.

Required CoursesChoose two of the following:
0525-401 Beginning Arabic II
0525-402 Beginning Arabic III
0525-403 Intermediate Arabic I
0525-404 Intermediate Arabic II
0525-405 Intermediate Arabic III
0525-406 Advanced Arabic I
0525-407 Advanced Arabic II
0525-408 Advanced Arabic III

ElectivesChoose one of the following:
0505-487 Special Topics: Art of Islam: Persian/Turkish/Mughal Traditions
0505-487 Special Topics: Art of Islam: Arabic Tradition
0510-484 Islamic Culture/Middle East

Modern Language and Culture - ASL

Cindy Sanders, Concentration Adviser
(585) 286-5149, casnss@rit.edu

This concentration will introduce students to the language, customs, and cultural aspects (history, art, literature) of one particular country or area. Students will choose two consecutive language courses beyond the introductory prerequisite language course, as well as one related liberal arts culture course. The goal of this concentration is to raise students’ awareness of the relationship between language and culture and the differences between their own language and culture and those of the country they choose to study.

It is important to note that two out of the three required courses must be taken at RIT. Only one course may be transferred in, if necessary.

Students may not skip or go back to the lower level in the language course sequence. Students with some proficiency in the intended concentration should contact the concentration adviser to take a placement test prior to registration for the first course of the sequence at RIT. These concentrations are closed to native speakers. Evening students may not declare these concentrations.

Prerequisite:
0525-390 Beginning American Sign Language I

Required Courses:
0525-391 American Sign Language II
0525-392 American Sign Language III

Electives–Choose one of the following:
0504-545 Deaf American Literature
0507-463 American Deaf History
0507-473 European Deaf History
0507-476 Diversity in the Deaf Culture
0507-477 Oppression in Lives of Deaf People
0515-529 Deaf Culture in America
0525-385 Linguistics of ASL
0525-386 American Sign Language Literature

* ASL courses taken through NTID cannot be applied toward this concentration.

Modern Language and Culture - Chinese

Hiroko Yamashita, Concentration Adviser
(585) 475-6074, hxygsl@rit.edu

This concentration will introduce students to the language, customs, and cultural aspects (history, art, literature) of one particular country or area. Students will choose two consecutive language courses beyond the introductory prerequisite language course, as well as one related liberal arts culture course. The goal of this concentration is to raise students’ awareness of the relationship between language and culture and the differences between their own language and culture and those of the country they choose to study.

It is important to note that two out of the three required courses must be taken at RIT. Only one course may be transferred in, if necessary.

Students may not skip or go back to the lower level in the language course sequence. Students with some proficiency in the intended concentration should contact the concentration adviser to take a placement test prior to registration for the first course of the sequence at RIT. These concentrations are closed to native speakers. Evening students may not declare these concentrations.

Prerequisite: Beginning Chinese I (0525-420) or equivalent

Required coursesChoose two of the following:
0525-421 Beginning Chinese II
0525-422 Beginning Chinese III
0525-423 Intermediate Chinese I
0525-424 Intermediate Chinese II
0525-425 Intermediate Chinese III
0525-426 Advanced Chinese I
0525-427 Advanced Chinese II
0525-428 Advanced Chinese III

Electives–Choose one of the following:
0504-447 Special Topics: Chinese
0505-469 Art of China, Korea, and Japan
0507-485 Foundations of Asian Civilizations
0507-486 20th Century China and Japan
0507-487 Communist China
0513-441 Politics in China
0513-496 Government and Politics in East Asia

Modern Language and Culture - French

Philippe Chavasse, Concentration Adviser
(585) 475-3156, pxcgsl@rit.edu

This concentration will introduce students to the language, customs, and cultural aspects (history, art, literature) of one particular country or area. Students will choose two consecutive language courses beyond the introductory prerequisite language course, as well as one related liberal arts culture course. The goal of this concentration is to raise students’ awareness of the relationship between language and culture and the differences between their own language and culture and those of the country they choose to study.

It is important to note that two out of the three required courses must be taken at RIT. Only one course may be transferred in, if necessary.

Students may not skip or go back to the lower level in the language course sequence. Students with some proficiency in the intended concentration should contact the concentration adviser to take a placement test prior to registration for the first course of the sequence at RIT. These concentrations are closed to native speakers. Evening students may not declare these concentrations.

Prerequisite: Beginning French I (0525-440) or equivalent

Required Courses—Choose two of the following:
0525-441 Beginning French II
0525-442 Beginning French III
0525-443 Intermediate French I
0525-444 Intermediate French II
0525-445 Intermediate French III
0525-446 Advanced French I
0525-447 Advanced French II
0525-448 Advanced French III
0525-459 Special Topics: Modern French Society

Electives—Choose one from the following:
0525-458 French Films and Hollywood
0504-487 Literature of French Black Africa and the Caribbean
0504-499 The View from Paris
0510-457 Divided Europe
0535-520 Intercultural Communication

Modern Language and Culture - German

Ulrike Stroszeck, Concentration Adviser
(585) 475-2921, uisgsl@rit.edu

This concentration will introduce students to the language, customs, and cultural aspects (history, art, literature) of one particular country or area. Students will choose two consecutive language courses beyond the introductory prerequisite language course, as well as one related liberal arts culture course. The goal of this concentration is to raise students’ awareness of the relationship between language and culture and the differences between their own language and culture and those of the country they choose to study.

It is important to note that two out of the three required courses must be taken at RIT. Only one course may be transferred in, if necessary.

Students may not skip or go back to the lower level in the language course sequence. Students with some proficiency in the intended concentration should contact the concentration adviser to take a placement test prior to registration for the first course of the sequence at RIT. These concentrations are closed to native speakers. Evening students may not declare these concentrations.

Prerequisite: Beginning German I (0525-460) or equivalent

Required Courses—Choose two of the following:
0525-461 Beginning German II
0525-462 Beginning German III
0525-463 Intermediate German I
0525-464 Intermediate German II
0525-465 Intermediate German III
0525-466 Advanced German I
0525-467 Advanced German II
0525-468 Advanced German III

Electives—Choose one from the following:
0525-477 Contemporary German Culture*
0525-479 Special Topics: Modern German Culture Through Film
0505-459 Era of Haydn and Mozart
0505-465 Special Topics: Mozart’s Operas
0505-482 Beethoven
0505-483 Bach and the Baroque
0505-484 Romanticism in Music
0505-486 German Theater and Drama
0507-488 Modern Germany

* Contemporary German Culture (0525-477) is offered alternating summers in Germany.

Modern Language and Culture - Italian

Elisabetta D’Amanda, Concentration Adviser
(585) 475-6928, exdgla@rit.edu

This concentration will introduce students to the language, customs, and cultural aspects (history, art, literature) of one particular country or area. Students will choose two consecutive language courses beyond the introductory prerequisite language course, as well as one related liberal arts culture course. The goal of this concentration is to raise students’ awareness of the relationship between language and culture and the differences between their own language and culture and those of the country they choose to study.

It is important to note that two out of the three required courses must be taken at RIT. Only one course may be transferred in, if necessary.

Students may not skip or go back to the lower level in the language course sequence. Students with some proficiency in the intended concentration should contact the concentration adviser to take a placement test prior to registration for the first course of the sequence at RIT. These concentrations are closed to native speakers. Evening students may not declare these concentrations.

Prerequisite: Beginning Italian I (0525-500) or equivalent

Required Courses—Choose two of the following:
0525-501 Beginning Italian II
0525-502 Beginning Italian III
0525-503 Intermediate Italian I
0525-504 Intermediate Italian II
0525-505 Intermediate Italian III
0525-506 Advanced Italian I
0525-507 Advanced Italian II
0525-508 Advanced Italian III

Electives—Choose one from the following:
0525-519 Contemporary Italian Culture*
0504-435 Special Topics: Italian Literature†
0504-435 Special Topics: Survey of Italian Literature†

* Contemporary Italian Culture (0525-519) is offered each summer in Italy

† Special Topics: Italian Literature (0504-435) and Special Topics: Survey of Italian Literature (0504-435) are offered every other year.

Modern Language and Culture - Japanese

Yukiko Maru Leary, Concentration Adviser
(585) 475-4558, yxmgls@rit.edu

This concentration will introduce students to the language, customs, and cultural aspects (history, art, literature) of one particular country or area. Students will choose two consecutive language courses beyond the introductory prerequisite language course, as well as one related liberal arts culture course. The goal of this concentration is to raise students’ awareness of the relationship between language and culture and the differences between their own language and culture and those of the country they choose to study.

It is important to note that two out of the three required courses must be taken at RIT. Only one course may be transferred in, if necessary.

Students may not skip or go back to the lower level in the language course sequence. Students with some proficiency in the intended concentration should contact the concentration adviser to take a placement test prior to registration for the first course of the sequence at RIT. These concentrations are closed to native speakers. Evening students may not declare these concentrations.

Prerequisite: Beginning Japanese I (0525-480) or equivalent

Required Courses—Choose two of the following:
0525-481 Beginning Japanese II
0525-482 Beginning Japanese III
0525-483 Intermediate Japanese I
0525-484 Intermediate Japanese II
0525-485 Intermediate Japanese III
0525-486 Advanced Japanese I
0525-487 Advanced Japanese II
0525-488 Advanced Japanese III

Electives—Choose one of the following:
0525-495 Japanese Culture in Print
0525-496 Structure of Japanese Language
0525-497 Languages in Japanese Society
0505-469 Art of China, Korea, and Japan
0507-468 The U.S. and Japan
0507-485 Foundations of Asian Civilizations
0507-486 20th Century China and Japan
0507-489 Japan in the Modern World
0513-496 Government and Politics in East Asia

Modern Language and Culture - Russian

Yukiko Maru, Concentration Adviser
(585) 475-4558, yxmgsl@rit.edu

This concentration will introduce students to the language, customs, and cultural aspects (history, art, literature) of one particular country or area. Students will choose two consecutive language courses beyond the introductory prerequisite language course, as well as one related liberal arts culture course. The goal of this concentration is to raise students’ awareness of the relationship between language and culture and the differences between their own language and culture and those of the country they choose to study.

It is important to note that two out of the three required courses must be taken at RIT. Only one course may be transferred in, if necessary.

Students may not skip or go back to the lower level in the language course sequence. Students with some proficiency in the intended concentration should contact the concentration adviser to take a placement test prior to registration for the first course of the sequence at RIT. These concentrations are closed to native speakers. Evening students may not declare these concentrations.

Russian language and culture minor (quarters)

Prerequisite: Beginning Russian I (0525-540) or equivalent.

Required Courses—Choose two of the following:
0525-541 Beginning Russian II
0525-542 Beginning Russian III
0525-543 Intermediate Russian I
0525-544 Intermediate Russian II
0525-545 Intermediate Russian III
0525-546 Advanced Russian I
0525-547 Advanced Russian II
0525-548 Advanced Russian III

Electives—Choose one of the following:
0504-435 Great Authors: Tolstoy
0504-435 Great Authors: Dostoyevsky
0504-485 Global Literature: Russian Literature
0505-435 Russian Art, 10th through 20th Century
0505-452 Special Topics: Russian Art I
0505-452 Special Topics: Russian Art II
0507-448 History of Russia to 1917
0507-449 History of Russia Since 1917
0507-450 Stalin, Mussolini, and Hitler
0513-443 Politics of Russia
0513-444 The Cold War and Beyond

Russian language and culture minor (semesters), effective fall 2013

Required CoursesChoose any five sequential language courses. One culture course may be substituted for one of the language courses with permission of the minor adviser.

MLRU-201 Beginning Russian I
MLRU-202 Beginning Russian II
MLRU-301 Intermediate Russian I
MLRU-302 Intermediate Russian II
MLRU-401 Advanced Russian I
MLRU-402 Advanced Russian II
ENGL-418 Great Authors
ENGL-416 Global Literature

 

Modern Language and Culture - Spanish

Diane Forbes, Concentration Adviser
(585) 475-6765, djfgsl@rit.edu

This concentration will introduce students to the language, customs, and cultural aspects (history, art, literature) of one particular country or area. Students will choose two consecutive language courses beyond the introductory prerequisite language course, as well as one related liberal arts culture course. The goal of this concentration is to raise students’ awareness of the relationship between language and culture and the differences between their own language and culture and those of the country they choose to study.

It is important to note that two out of the three required courses must be taken at RIT. Only one course may be transferred in, if necessary.

Students may not skip or go back to the lower level in the language course sequence. Students with some proficiency in the intended concentration should contact the concentration adviser to take a placement test prior to registration for the first course of the sequence at RIT. These concentrations are closed to native speakers. Evening students may not declare these concentrations.

Prerequisite: Beginning Spanish I (0525-560) or equivalent.

Required Courses—Choose two of the following:
0525-561 Beginning Spanish II
0525-562 Beginning Spanish III
0525-563 Intermediate Spanish I
0525-564 Intermediate Spanish II
0525-565 Intermediate Spanish III
0525-566 Advanced Spanish I
0525-567 Advanced Spanish II
0525-568 Advanced Spanish III

Electives—Choose one of the following:†
0525-576 Trauma and Survival in the First-Person Narrative
0525-577 Screening the Hispanic Caribbean
0525-578 Women in the Hispanic World: Politics of Identity Formation
0525-579 Special Topics*
0504-435 Global Literature: Latin American Literature
0504-447 Special Topics: Magical Realism
0504-479 The Latino Experience in Literature
0510-442 Cultures and Politics in Latin America
0510-444 Global Economy and the Grassroots

* Special Topics (0525-579) may include the following: The Caribbean and Globalization and Cuban Film: Cultural and National Identity.

† With department approval: CIAS Art History: Latin American Art History I & II plus one additional credit per course

Music

College of Liberal Arts, Office of Student Services
(585) 475-2444, libarts@rit.edu

A concentration in music offers courses in the history, theory, and practice of music. Students with a background in music and/or a genuine desire to know more about the subject will have the opportunity to expand their knowledge of various theoretical and historical aspects as well as participate in performing groups at RIT. Note: Evening students may not declare this concentration.

Electives—Choose three of the following:
0505-401 RIT Singers*
0505-402 RIT Orchestra*
0505-403 RIT Concert Band*
0504-404 RIT World Music Ensemble*
0504-405 RIT Jazz Ensemble*
0505-420 Applied Music*
0505-442 Music in the United States
0505-447 The American Musical Theater
0505-448 20th Century American Music
0505-449 Music Theory I†
0505-450 Music and the Stage
0505-454 Orchestra Repertoire and History
0505-455 Survey of Jazz
0505-456 Topics in Music History
0505-459 Era of Haydn and Mozart
0505-461 World Music I
0505-462 World Music II
0505-463 Survey of African-American Music
0505-464 Blues as Personal and Social Commentary
0505-465 Special Topics in Music
0505-466 Sounds of Protest
0505-470 American Popular Song 1830-1950
0505-471 American Popular and Rock Music
0505-482 Beethoven
0505-483 Bach and the Baroque
0505-484 Romanticism in Music
0505-485 Music Theory II‡

* Each of these ensemble and applied music courses is one quarter credit hour. Four quarters of participation are required to complete one concentration course.

† Prerequisite: Elementary Music Skills

‡ Prerequisite: Music Theory I (0505-449).

Native American Science and Technology

College of Liberal Arts, Office of Student Services
(585) 475-2444, libarts@rit.edu

The Native American science and technology concentration enhances students’ understanding of the unique heritages of Native North Americans and their relationships with other peoples in the United States and Canada. Courses emphasize traditional ways of learning, modern and ancient technologies used by contemporary tribes, histories of relations, and Native American and First Nations science.

Electives—Choose three of the following:
0510-442 Cultures in Latin America
0510-446 Native North Americans
0510-448 Native Americans in Film
0510-450 Cultural Resource Management and Historic Preservation
0510-461 Native American Repatriation
0510-462 Language and Revitalization
0510-484 Islamic Culture/Middle East
0510-502 Archaeology and Human Past
0510-507 Archaeological Science
0510-511 Field Methods in Archaeology
0510-599 Independent Study: Field Experience with a Native American Tribe
0511-467 Economy of Native America
0526-441 GIS Applications

Philosophy

College of Liberal Arts, Office of Student Services
(585) 475-2444, libarts@rit.edu

The philosophy concentration provides students with an opportunity to study the nature, methods, problems, and achievements of philosophical inquiry. The concentration emphasizes the following goals: the ability to think rationally and critically, an awareness of ethical values, an appreciation of aesthetic values, an awareness of how the past affects the present and future, and an understanding of the relationship between the individual and the social settings with which he or she interacts. This concentration is closed to students enrolled in the philosophy degree program.

Electives—Choose three of the following:
0509-440 Philosophy of Religion
0509-441 Logic
0509-442 Philosophy of Art/Aesthetics*
0509-443 Philosophy of Science‡
0509-444 The Great Thinkers**
0509-445 Social and Political Philosophy§
0509-446 Philosophy of Law
0509-447 Contemporary Moral Problems
0509-448 Philosophy of Peace
0509-449 Special Topics**
0509-450 Seminar in Philosophy†**
0509-451 Professional Ethics
0509-452 Philosophy of Technology
0509-453 Environmental Philosophy
0509-454 Feminist Theory*
0509-455 Theories of Knowledge
0509-456 Ancient Philosophy
0509-457 Modern Philosophy
0509-458 Philosophy of Mind
0509-459 Philosophy of the Social Sciences††
0509-460 East Asian Philosophy
0509-461 American Philosophy
0509-462 Contemporary Philosophy
0509-464 Philosophy of Action
0509-465 Critical Theory*
0509-466 Existentialism
0509-467 Medieval Philosophy
0509-468 Metaphysics*
0509-469 19th Century Philosophy*
0509-470 Philosophy and Literary Theory*
0509-471 Philosophy of Film*
0509-472 Minds and Machines
0509-473 Technology and Embodiment
0509-474 Philosophy of Language*
0509-475 Philosophy of Vision/Imaging*
0509-476 Ethical Theory
0509-571 Honors Philosophy

* Prerequisite: One previous philosophy course or permission of the instructor is strongly encouraged.

† Prerequisite: Two prior courses in philosophy or permission of the instructor.

‡ Prerequisite: At least one prior course in either philosophy or one of the natural sciences (physics, chemistry, or biology).

§ Prerequisite: At least one prior course in philosophy, political science, or sociology

** Topics may vary.

†† Prerequisite: At least one prior course in either philosophy or one of the social sciences (psychology, economics, political science, sociology, or anthropology)

Psychology

College of Liberal Arts, Office of Student Services
(585) 475-2444, libarts@rit.edu

This concentration provides advanced study in various areas of psychology. Courses enable students to learn more about their own and others’ functioning. Students will become well-informed consumers of psychological information and will also learn to apply psychological principles in their own lives. Note: This concentration is closed to students enrolled in the psychology program.

Prerequisite:
0514-210 Introduction to Psychology or equivalent

Electives—Choose three of the following:
0502-463 Language and Brain
0514-440 Childhood and Adolescence
0514-441 Humanistic Psychology
0514-442 Adulthood and Aging
0514-443 Cognitive Psychology
0514-444 Social Psychology
0514-445 Psychology of Perception
0514-446 Psychology of Personality
0514-447 Abnormal Psychology
0514-448 Industrial and Organizational Psychology
0514-449 Behavior Modification
0514-451 Psychology of Motivation
0514-453 Death and Dying
0514-483 Social Psychology of Religion
0514-544 History and Systems

Public Policy

College of Liberal Arts, Office of Student Services
(585) 475-2444, libarts@rit.edu

This concentration provides students with a clear understanding of public policy, the policy process, and policy analysis. Students have the opportunity to develop perspectives on a variety of contemporary public policy issues, especially those that emerge from scientific and technological advancements. At the heart of the concentration is the Foundations of Public Policy (0521-400) course, where students are introduced to the concept of public policy and the policy making process. The roles of stakeholders and interest groups are discussed in the context of contemporary cases in various policy arenas. Students are also introduced to some of the methodologies associated with policy analysis. Additional courses are offered from the areas of sociology; political science; and science, technology, and society. Policy Analysis I and II (0521-402, 403) are offered especially for students who are considering the MS in public policy or who have an interest in analytical tools.

Required course:
0521-400 Foundations of Public Policy

Electives—Choose two of the following:
0508-441 Science and Technology Policy
0508-484 Environmental Policy
0508-530 Seminar in Science, Technology, and the Environment*
0508-540 Science and Technology Policy Seminar*
0513-455 Politics and Public Policy*
0515-413 Urban Planning and Policy
0515-451 Transfer Technology and Globalization*
0521-401 Values and Public Policy*
0521-402 Policy Analysis I*
0521-403 Policy Analysis II*
0521-404 Policy Analysis III*
0521-406 Introduction to Qualitative Analysis*
0521-408 Technological Innovation and Public Policy*
0521-410 Information and Communications Policy*
0521-449 Special Topics in Public Policy†
0521-451 Energy Policy

* These courses have prerequisites or co-requisites.

† Topics will vary.

Religious Studies

College of Liberal Arts, Office of Student Services
(585) 475-2444, libarts@rit.edu

Religion plays a major role in human affairs. To understand the nature of society and the individual, it is essential to have some understanding of religion. The religious studies concentration engages students in the study of religion from the perspective of major Western and non-Western traditions through courses in such disciplines as anthropology, history, literature, philosophy, political science, the fine arts, and sociology. (With approval from the religious studies adviser, certain Special Topics or Great Thinkers courses may also satisfy the requirements for the concentration.)

Electives—Choose three of the following:
0504-464 Mythology and Folklore
0504-467 African American Literature
0504-484 Literature and Religion*
0505-468 Art of India and Southeast Asia
0505-469 Art of China, Korea, and Japan
0505-487 Art of Islam
0507-483 History of Christianity
0509-440 Philosophy of Religion
0509-460 East Asian Philosophy
0509-466 Existentialism†
0509-467 Medieval Philosophy
0509-468 Metaphysics†
0509-469 19th Century Philosophy†
0510-446 Native North Americans
0510-483 Anthropology of Religion
0510-484 Islamic Culture and the Middle East
0513-492 Religion and International Politics
0514-483 Social Psychology of Religion

* Prerequisite: Writing (0502-227).

† Student must obtain the approval of the religious studies concentration adviser.

Science and Technology Studies

College of Liberal Arts, Office of Student Services
(585) 475-2444, libarts@rit.edu

The science and technology studies concentration examines some major impacts of science and technology in the contemporary world. Special reference will be given to American concerns. Students gain an overall appreciation of the social nature of science and technology as they have developed in the past, as they exist today, and as they may affect society in the future under various scenarios. Science and technology have become social systems in their own right and have made possible increasing freedom, a fantastic variety of choice, and, paradoxically, the growing interdependence of all segments of world society. A new level of public awareness and concern is crucial to understanding and dealing successfully with these consequences.

Electives—Choose three of the following:
0504-462 Literature and Technology*
0508-440 History of Science
0508-441 Science and Technology Policy
0508-442 History of American Technology
0508-443 Face of the Land
0508-444 Social Consequences of Technology
0508-445 Biomedical Issues: Science and Technology Studies
0508-446 Makers of Modern Science
0508-447 Special Topics: Science and Technology‡
0508-449 History of Women in Science and Engineering
0508-450 History of Chemistry
0508-451 Cyborg Theory: (Re)Thinking the Human Experience in the 21st Century
0508-452 Gender, Science, and Technology
0508-500 Science, Technology, and Society Classics
0508-520 Historical Perspectives on Science and Technology Seminar**
0508-530 Seminar in Science, Technology, and the Environment**
0508-540 Science and Technology Policy Seminar
0509-443 Philosophy of Science†
0515-451 Transfer Technology and Globalization§
0521-451 Energy Policy

* Prerequisite: Writing (0502-227) or an equivalent course.

† Prerequisite: At least one prior course in either philosophy or one of the natural sciences.

‡ Topics may vary.

§ Prerequisite: Foundations of Sociology (0515-210) or equivalent.

** Prerequisites: Any two of the history of science or technology courses approved by the department.

Sociology and Anthropology

College of Liberal Arts, Office of Student Services
(585) 475-2444, libarts@rit.edu

This concentration examines the dynamism and creative contestation of culture and social norms across the globe, as well as the constraints within which people negotiate meaningful lives. By selecting from courses on a wide range of topics—including gender and sexuality, families and marriage, ethnicity and racism, class and inequality, immigration, health and cultural conceptions of the body, urban life, war and violence, cultural images and mass media, technology and work, social movements, and globalization—students explore how people create and experience their social worlds.

Prerequisite–Choose one of the following:
0515-210 Foundations of Sociology (or equivalent)
0510-210 Cultural Anthropology (or equivalent)

Electives—Choose three of the following:
0510-440 Cultures in Globalization
0510-442 Cultures and Politics in Latin America
0510-443 Immigration to the U.S.
0510-444 Global Economy and the Grassroots
0510-445 Global Cities
0510-446 Native North Americans
0510-447 Anthropology of Mass Media
0510-448 Native Americans in Film
0510-449 Sustainable Development
0510-450 Cultural Resource Management and Historic Preservation
0510-451 Global Sexualities
0510-452 Bodies and Culture
0510-454 Visual Anthropology
0510-457 Divided Europe
0510-459 Cultural Images of War and Terror
0510-460 Genocide and Post-Conflict Justice
0510-461 Native American Repatriation
0510-464 Nationalism and Identity
0510-465 Social and Cultural Theory
0510-483 Anthropology of Religion
0510-484 Islamic Culture and the Middle East
0510-486 Globalizing Africa
0510-487 African Popular Cultures
0510-488 Muslim Youth Cultures
0510-502 Archaeology and the Human Past
0510-506 Great Discoveries in Archaeology
0510-507 Archaeological Science
0510-508 The Archaeology of Cities
0510-509 Survey of Metallurgy
0510-511 Field Methods in Archaeology
0510-512 Garbage Archaeology
0515-406 Qualitative Methods
0515-413 Urban Planning and Policy
0515-441 The Changing Family
0515-442 Urban Experience
0515-443 Sociology of Work
0515-444 Social Change
0515-446 Sociology of Health
0515-447 Women, Work, and Culture
0515-448 Minority Group Relations
0515-449 Population and Society
0515-451 Transfer of Technology and Globalization
0515-453 Global Exiles of War and Terror
0515-454 US Housing Policy
0515-455 Urban Poverty
0515-482 African-American Culture
0515-483 Hispanic-American Culture
0515-485 Diversity in the City
0515-506 Social Inequality
0515-507 Complex Organizations
0515-509 Social Policy
0515-515 Social Policy and Aging
0515-524 Applied Sociology
0515-529 Deaf Culture in America
0515-569 Human Sexuality
0524-420 Introduction to African Studies
0524-421 African Slave Trade
0524-422 Histories of Globalization
0526-440 Quantitative Research
0526-441 GIS Applications in Urban Cultural Studies

Theater Arts

College of Liberal Arts, Office of Student Services
(585) 475-2444, libarts@rit.edu

This concentration offers students a focused study of the theatrical and dramatic arts, with courses in dramatic and theatrical literature, history, criticism, and theory. It also serves to offer students a more profound understanding of the theater arts and in a broader sense an introduction to cultural development and the communication of ideas.

Electives—Choose three of the following:
0505-450 Music and the Stage
0505-453 Theater in the United States
0505-457 Contemporary Drama, Theater, and Media
0505-458 Modern European Theater and Drama
0505-486 German Theater and Drama
0505-488 Special Topics: Theater Arts
0505-489 Theater Production Seminar and Workshop
0505-502 Shakespeare the Dramatist

Urban Studies

College of Liberal Arts, Office of Student Services
(585) 475-2444, libarts@rit.edu

Metropolitan areas must address such perennial issues as housing, transportation, education, crime, safety, recreation, and economic development. Each must do so with recognition of its place in the wider regional, national, and global contexts as well as with sensitivity to its own defining features. The urban studies concentration helps students identify and analyze such fundamental issues and allows them to explore and assess various ways policy-makers respond to those issues.

Prerequisite–Choose one of the following:
0515-210 Foundations of Sociology (or equivalent)
0510-210 Cultural Anthropology (or equivalent)

Electives–Choose three of the following:
0510-443 Immigration to the U.S.
0510-445 Global Cities
0510-465 Social and Cultural Theory
0510-508 Archaeology of Cities
0515-413 Urban Planning and Policy
0515-442 The Urban Experience
0515-454 U.S. Housing Policy
0515-455 Urban Poverty
0515-485 Diversity in the City
0526-443 Community and Economic Development: Rochester

Women and Gender Studies

College of Liberal Arts, Office of Student Services
(585) 475-2444, libarts@rit.edu

Women and gender studies offers students a variety of academic perspectives on the role of women in modern western civilization. The courses enable the student to examines the roles, values, and self-perceptions of women in a traditionally male-oriented society; develop a sophisticated, humanistic angle of vision from which to appreciate the many and varied accomplishments of women; and develop a mature sensitivity to the difficulties and frustrations encountered by women. Although the focus of the concentration is on the experiences of women, the concentration does not intend to be a study in separatism. Rather, it offers the possibility for integrating a new, academically disciplined appreciation of women’s issues into the student’s comprehension of wider problems and issues of humanity. All courses emphasize critical reading, thinking, and analysis. All require at least one substantial written assignment. Students are encouraged to relate the intellectual knowledge gained in each course to insights about their own experience and behavior.

Electives—Choose three of the following:
0505-480 Women and Visual Arts
0505-491 Traumatic Images
0505-516 Queer Looks
0510-451 Global Sexualities
0522-400 Foundations of Gender Studies*
0522-401 American Woman: Colonies to 1848*
0522-402 American Woman: 1848 to Now*
0522-405 Women and Science
0522-406 Feminist Theory*
0522-407 Seminar on Sexual Violence
0522-410 Introduction to Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, and Transgender Studies
0522-415 Domestic Violence
0522-436 Women’s Stories, Women’s Films*
0522-439 Queer Looks I
0522-446 Women and Crime*
0522-447 Women, Work, and Culture*
0522-449 History of Women in Science and Engineering
0522-450 Gender, Science, and Technology*
0522-451 Global Sexualities
0522-452 Bodies and Culture
0522-453 Economic Role of Women
0522-454 Hispanic Women in the World
0522-459 Toni Morrison*
0522-460 Special Topics†
0522-480 Women and the Visual Arts*
0522-481 Women’s Studies in Language and Literature*
0522-482 Women in Politics*
0522-483 Psychology of Women*
0522-484 Auto/Biography
0525-543 Women in the Hispanic World: Politics of Identity Formation

* These courses may require prerequisites.

† Special Topics (0522-460) may include the following: Traumatic Images, Queer Looks II, Art of Dying, Contemporary Women’s History, Prostitution and Vice, and Queering Gender.

Writing Studies

College of Liberal Arts, Office of Student Services
(585) 475-2444, libarts@rit.edu

This concentration provides opportunities for advanced study in writing and linguistics. Courses provide opportunities for students to study language and develop strategies for effective writing across a variety of contexts. Writing processes and language awareness from academic to public forums receive close attention.

Prerequisite:
0502-227 Writing (or equivalent)

Electives—Choose three of the following:
0502-443 Written Argument
0502-444 Technical Writing
0502-445 The Evolving English Language
0502-449 Worlds of Writing
0502-455 Writing the Self and Others
0502-456 Rhetoric of Science
0502-457 Language, Variation, and Identity
0502-459 Creative Nonfiction
0502-460 Science Writing
0502-463 Language and Brain
0502-560 Special Topics: Introduction to Language Science