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Events

CLA Hale Lecture Series
September 8, 2016
Thursday, September 8th 4:00 – 5:30 pm Campus Center Bamboo Room (Rm. 2610)   Evelyn Brister Rochester Institute of Technology Department of Philosophy   “Doing Good and Being Wrong:  Ethics & Ignorance” How should we think about ethics education if, rather than training people to be good, the point of ethics education is to address ignorance? That is, what follows if we take seriously Plato's view of morality—that unethical actions are often the result of sloppy, careless thinking, and not evil intentions? I argue that if we think of ethical action as depending on knowledge, then the curriculum for practical ethics should emphasize moral psychology, ethical reasoning skills, the status of moral facts, and examples of avoidable moral mistakes.   FREE & OPEN TO THE PUBLIC Interpreters provided upon request & subject to availability. Please make your request TODAY by going to Access.rit.edu. (Thursday, September 8th, 4:00 PM to 5:30 PM - Campus Center Bamboo Room, 2610)
CLA Gosnell Lecture Series
September 21, 2016
The College of Liberal Arts Gosnell Lecture Series presents   Randall Jackson Director, Regional Research Institute Professor, Geology & Geography West Virginia University   Wednesday, September 21st Time:           3:00 – 4:00 pm Place:          Liberal Arts Hall                    Room A205 (Basement Level)   Object Orientation, Open Science, and Cumulative Knowledge Building   Because so many present and future challenges are regional in scope, regional solutions will be needed, and the next 50 years of research at the regional level will only grow in importance. In the future, appropriate regional scales will be supranational, national, and subnational, many global problems will require localized solutions, and there will be an increasing recognition of the importance of integrating multi-scale human and physical systems models, recognizing that economic and environmental sustainability are inseparable. Models of systems of integrated systems will play an increasingly prominent role. Future modeling research will move away from individual efforts and toward projects that leverage new technologies that support group development and intelligence. The cumulative knowledge-building promise of open source and open science dwarfs that of the individual and small team research silos of the past. The collective development of software tools like Linux, Python and R libraries, and PySAL, to name just a few, is well underway, and fledgling models integrating human and environmental systems are clearly on the horizon. This chapter presents our vision of the path forward in integrated systems modeling, founded on the open source, open science, object oriented modeling triumvirate, using a dynamic interindustry space time economic model to focus the discussion.   Interpreters provided upon request subject to availability. Please make your request TODAY by going to the following website myAccess.rit.edu. (Wednesday, September 21st, 3:00 PM to 4:00 PM - Other Liberal Arts Hall, Room A205)
CLA Gosnell Lecture Series
September 21, 2016
The College of Liberal Arts Gosnell Lecture Series presents   Randall Jackson Director, Regional Research Institute Professor, Geology & Geography West Virginia University   Thursday, September 29th Time:                    3:00 – 4:00 pm Place:        Liberal Arts Hall                    Room A205 (Basement Level)   Object Orientation, Open Science, and Cumulative Knowledge Building   Because so many present and future challenges are regional in scope, regional solutions will be needed, and the next 50 years of research at the regional level will only grow in importance. In the future, appropriate regional scales will be supranational, national, and subnational, many global problems will require localized solutions, and there will be an increasing recognition of the importance of integrating multi-scale human and physical systems models, recognizing that economic and environmental sustainability are inseparable. Models of systems of integrated systems will play an increasingly prominent role. Future modeling research will move away from individual efforts and toward projects that leverage new technologies that support group development and intelligence. The cumulative knowledge-building promise of open source and open science dwarfs that of the individual and small team research silos of the past. The collective development of software tools like Linux, Python and R libraries, and PySAL, to name just a few, is well underway, and fledgling models integrating human and environmental systems are clearly on the horizon. This chapter presents our vision of the path forward in integrated systems modeling, founded on the open source, open science, object oriented modeling triumvirate, using a dynamic interindustry space time economic model to focus the discussion. Interpreters provided upon request subject to availability. Please make your request TODAY by going to the following website myAccess.rit.edu. (Wednesday, September 21st, 3:00 PM to 4:00 PM - Other Liberal Arts Hall, Room A205)
CLA Gosnell Lecture Series
September 29, 2016
The College of Liberal Arts Gosnell Lecture Series presents Mary E. Lovely Chair, International Relations Program Melvin A. Eggers Faculty Scholar & Professor of Economics Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs Syracuse University   Thursday, September 29th Time:      3:00 – 4:00 pm Place:      SAU                 1829 Room Topic: “Import Competition from and Offshoring to Low-Income Countries:  Implications for US Manufacturing Employment” In this talk, Dr. Mary E.  Lovely provides an overview of recent trends in US manufacturing employment and in US imports from low-income countries, especially the People’s Republic of China.  She then offers several conceptual lenses useful in understanding how trade with low-income countries influences US manufacturing jobs.  The discussion proceeds to consideration of the evidence available for each explanation, concluding with an overview of what we learn from this evidence and what questions remain open Interpreters provided upon request subject to availability. Please make your request TODAY by going to the following website myAccess.rit.edu. (Thursday, September 29th, 3:00 PM to 4:00 PM - Student Alumni Union (SAU) 1829 Room)
CLA Gosnell Lecture Series
September 29, 2016
The College of Liberal Arts Gosnell Lecture Series presents Randall Jackson Director, Regional Research Institute Professor, Geology & Geography West Virginia University Thursday, September 29th Time:           3:00 – 4:00 pm Place:          Liberal Arts Hall                      Room A205 (Basement Level) Object Orientation, Open Science, and Cumulative Knowledge Building Because so many present and future challenges are regional in scope, regional solutions will be needed, and the next 50 years of research at the regional level will only grow in importance. In the future, appropriate regional scales will be supranational, national, and subnational, many global problems will require localized solutions, and there will be an increasing recognition of the importance of integrating multi-scale human and physical systems models, recognizing that economic and environmental sustainability are inseparable. Models of systems of integrated systems will play an increasingly prominent role. Future modeling research will move away from individual efforts and toward projects that leverage new technologies that support group development and intelligence. The cumulative knowledge-building promise of open source and open science dwarfs that of the individual and small team research silos of the past. The collective development of software tools like Linux, Python and R libraries, and PySAL, to name just a few, is well underway, and fledgling models integrating human and environmental systems are clearly on the horizon. This chapter presents our vision of the path forward in integrated systems modeling, founded on the open source, open science, object oriented modeling triumvirate, using a dynamic interindustry space time economic model to focus the discussion.     Interpreters provided upon request subject to availability. Please make your request TODAY by going to the following website myAccess.rit.edu. (Thursday, September 29th, 3:00 PM to 4:00 PM - Other 06-A205)
CLA Gosnell Lecture Series
September 29, 2016
The College of Liberal Arts Gosnell Lecture Series presents Mary E. Lovely Chair, International Relations Program Melvin A. Eggers Faculty Scholar & Professor of Economics Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs Syracuse University Thursday, September 29th Time:      3:00 – 4:00 pm Place:      SAU                 1829 Room   Topic: “Import Competition From and Offshoring to Low-Income Countries:  Implications for US Manufacturing Employment” In this talk, Dr. Mary E.  Lovely provides an overview of recent trends in US manufacturing employment and in US imports from low-income countries, especially the People’s Republic of China.  She then offers several conceptual lenses useful in understanding how trade with low-income countries influences US manufacturing jobs.  The discussion proceeds to consideration of the evidence available for each explanation, concluding with an overview of what we learn from this evidence and what questions remain open.   Interpreters provided upon request subject to availability. Please make your request TODAY by going to the following website myAccess.rit.edu. (Thursday, September 29th, 3:00 PM to 4:00 PM - Student Alumni Union (SAU) 1829 Room)
CLA Hale Lecture Series
September 29, 2016
College of Liberal Arts Hale Lecture Series presents James Walker Depaul University Department of Philosophy & Peace, Justice, and Conflict Studies Program Thursday, September 29th 4:00 – 5:30 pm Campus Center Bamboo Room (Rm. 2610)   Decolonizing Conflict Narratives: Towards a Phenomenology of Peace For centuries, those interested in the moral analysis of the use of military force - in particular the question of jus ad bellum - have relied upon a conceptual framework known as "just war theory." It is the contention of this paper that this framework ultimately presupposes a manner of narrating conflict that dehumanizes those subjects living within the boundaries of those situations the ethicist aims to analyze from that theoretical perspective. Just war theory forces us to view the situations we are attempting to analyze in a manner that smuggles in problematic colonial presuppositions about subjects and the essential power relations that are fundamental to conflict and the struggle for peace in the lived world. After teasing out the problematic colonial presuppositions of just war theorizing, this paper will begin sketching an alternative manner of engaging in the moral conceptualization of war that relies on a phenomenological analysis of peace that emphasizes the strategizing and maneuvering of subjects "on the ground" as they live within the complex web of power relations that is fundamental to those subjects' notions of self and place in the world. In developing these points, cases from the web of conflicts that has continued to engulf the Great Lakes Region of Africa will be utilized. FREE & OPEN TO THE PUBLIC Interpreters provided upon request & subject to availability. Please make your request TODAY by going to Access.rit.edu. (Thursday, September 29th, 4:00 PM to 5:30 PM - Campus Center Bamboo Room, 2610)
CLA Hale Lecture Series
September 29, 2016
CLA Hale Lecture Series presents James Walker Depaul University Department of Philosophy & Peace, Justice, & Conflict Studies Program Thursday, September 29th 4:00 – 5:30 pm Campus Center Bamboo Room (Rm. 2610) Decolonizing Conflict Narratives: Towards a Phenomenology of Peace For centuries, those interested in the moral analysis of the use of military force - in particular the question of jus ad bellum - have relied upon a conceptual framework known as "just war theory." It is the contention of this paper that this framework ultimately presupposes a manner of narrating conflict that dehumanizes those subjects living within the boundaries of those situations the ethicist aims to analyze from that theoretical perspective. Just war theory forces us to view the situations we are attempting to analyze in a manner that smuggles in problematic colonial presuppositions about subjects and the essential power relations that are fundamental to conflict and the struggle for peace in the lived world. After teasing out the problematic colonial presuppositions of just war theorizing, this paper will begin sketching an alternative manner of engaging in the moral conceptualization of war that relies on a phenomenological analysis of peace that emphasizes the strategizing and maneuvering of subjects "on the ground" as they live within the complex web of power relations that is fundamental to those subjects' notions of self and place in the world. In developing these points, cases from the web of conflicts that has continued to engulf the Great Lakes Region of Africa will be utilized. FREE & OPEN TO THE PUBLIC Interpreters provided upon request & subject to availability. Please make your request TODAY by going to Access.rit.edu. (Thursday, September 29th, 4:00 PM to 5:30 PM - Student Life Center Bam)