About

Events

3/4/2015 - All-College Jazz Ensemble Concert
March 4, 2015
Under the direction of Mark Collins, RIT's Jazz Ensembles join with jazz ensembles from other Rochester-area colleges and universities to present an evening of cool, exciting jazz! (Wednesday, March 4th, 7:00 PM to 8:00 PM -Ingle Auditorium)
3/5/2015 - French Film Festival--Coco before Channel
March 5, 2015
Coco before Chanel (Coco avant Chanel). The story of Coco Chanel's rise from obscure beginnings to the heights of the fashion world. 2009 film by Anne Fontaine, with award-winning actress Audrey Tautou (Amélie). In French with English subtitles.(Thursday, March 5th, 7:00 PM to 9:30 PM - EAS-2000 )
3/6/2015 - Kimono Demonstration
March 6, 2015
Kimono Demonstration! Learn how to put on Kimono(Friday, March 6th, 4:30 PM to 6:00 PM -1829 Room)
3/6/2015 - Rebecca Penneys ' Piano Extravaganza
March 6, 2015
WHAT PIANISTS DO FOR FUN: 2 Pianos, 4 Pianists, 8 Hands, & 40 Flying Fingers! (Pianists: Rebecca Penneys, Eunmi Ko, Omri Shimron, Johnandrew Slominski)(Reception to follow in Fireside Lounge.)Alumni price same as Faculty/Staff $15(Friday, March 6th, 8:00 PM to 10:00 PM -Ingle Auditorium)
3/7/2015 - COLA Ice Skating
March 7, 2015
Ice Skating at Ritter Ice Arena onSaturday, March 7th5-7:45 pmWe will have the ice exclusively for COLA faculty, students, and staff; free skate rental, and refreshments.Please RSVP to: https://clipboard.rit.edu/take.cfm?sid=F205F22F This is a RIT Only event. (Saturday, March 7th, 5:00 PM to 7:45 PM - Ritter Ice Arena )
3/10/2015 - French Film Festival--Grand Illusion
March 10, 2015
Grand Illusion (La Grande illusion), 1937 masterwork by Jean Renoir, once hailed by Orson Welles as the “greatest of all directors.” Set during World War I and starring legendary French actor Jean Gabin, this film is a must see for anyone interested in cinema. In French with English subtitles.(Tuesday, March 10th, 7:00 PM to 9:30 PM -Golisano Auditorium)
3/12/2015 - Philosophy Lecture
March 12, 2015
Professor Theodore Everett (SUNY Geneseo), “A Model for Theories of Distributive Justice”(Thursday, March 12th, 3:30 PM to 5:00 PM - Bamboo Room )
3/12/2015 - CLA Hale Ethics Lecture Series
March 12, 2015
"A Model for Theories of Distributive Justice"Theodore Everett (Philosophy, SUNY Geneseo)A simple mathematical model for theories of distributive justice is presented. Many complex considerations are reduced to a single question: imagining a distribution system that imposes a flat-rate income tax on earnings solely in order to provide a guaranteed minimum income to every citizen, which available pair of tax rate and guaranteed income is most just? Model versions of the four main current theories of distributive justice: libertarianism, egalitarianism, utilitarianism, and Rawlsian, can be represented as distribugrams, and these four graphically define the range of possbility for stable systems of distribution. Intermediate model systems can be seen as balancing the moral forces of liberty, equality, utility, and compassion for the least well-off which separately motivate the four main theories. Viewing the range of theories of distributive justice in this simple framework sheds light on political arguments over Western welfare systems, and may suggest reforms.(Thursday, March 12th, 3:30 PM to 5:00 PM - Bamboo Room, SAU, Rm. 2650 )
3/12/2015 - French Film Festival--The Last of the Unjust
March 12, 2015
The Last of the Unjust (Le Dernier des injustes), 2013 documentary film by legendary filmmaker Claude Lanzmann. Lanzmann is best known for directing Shoah, recipient of multiple awards and held by critics as one of the best documentary films of all time. The Last of the Unjust was officially selected at Cannes, Toronto, London, and New York film festivals. In French with English subtitles.(Thursday, March 12th, 7:00 PM to 9:30 PM - EAS-2000 )
3/13/2015 - An Evening with Sakokwenionkwas Tom Porter
March 13, 2015
Tom Porter will be speaking on the founding, building and future direction of the Mohawk community of Kanatsiohare:ke, with Rohsennase Dalton LaBarge and Ionataie:was Kay Olan.Tom Porter (Mohawk Nation, Bear Clan) is the founder, spokesperson, and spiritual leader/director of the Mohawk Community of Kanatsiohare:ke (Ga na jo ha lay gay), located in the Mohawk Valley near Fonda, New York for the past 21 years. Prior to that, he served as a sub-chief for the Tekanakarine Chieftainship title of the Mohawk Nation for 21 years at Akwesasne, director and teacher at the Akwesasne Freedom School, teacher at the Kahnawake Survival School, a speaking member of the White Roots of Peace, and as Secretary and Interpreter for the Mohawk Nation Council of Chiefs. He retired in 2011 as Chaplain for all Native inmates incarcerated in New York State. Today, Tom continues to be an active speaker at community events, colleges, and universities throughout North America on the importance of revitalizing Native cultures and languages. He has also authored a number of books including: And Grandma Said… and Kanatsiohare:ke: Traditional Mohawk Indians Return to their Ancestral Homelands. Sakokwenionkwas means “The One Who Wins.” (Friday, March 13th, 6:00 PM to 9:00 PM - SAU Bamboo Room )
3/17/2015 - Psychology Brown Bag Series
March 17, 2015
Psychology Brown Bag SeriesCome and learn something new!Interpreters provided upon request subject to availability. Ifyou need an interpreter we appreciate you make your request1 week before the event. To make a request please go onlineat:http://www.myAccess.rit.eduAll are welcome!(Tuesday, March 17th, 3:30 PM to 4:45 PM - Institute Hall 73-1140 )
3/17/2015 - French Film Festival--Jimmy P
March 17, 2015
Jimmy P : Psychotherapy of a Plains Indian, 2013 Franco-American drama directed by French film director Arnaud Desplechin, starring award-winning French actor Mathieu Amalric (James Bond's Quantum of Solace, Spielberg's Munich). In English with closed captions.(Tuesday, March 17th, 7:00 PM to 9:30 PM -Golisano Auditorium)
3/18/2015 - Philosophy Lecture
March 18, 2015
Professor Shannon Vallor (Santa Clara University), “The Ethics of App Development”(Wednesday, March 18th, 1:00 PM to 2:30 PM -Center for Student Innovation (CSI))
3/18/2015 - Digital Humanities Distinguished Speaker Series
March 18, 2015
Dr. Chet Van Duzer“New Light on Henricus Martellus's World Map at Yale (c. 1489): Multispectral Imaging and Early Renaissance Cartography”In this talk I will give an account of a recent NEH-funded project to make multispectral images of a world map made by Henricus Martellus in about 1489, which is held by the Beinecke Library at Yale. This large map has long been thought to be one of the most important of the fifteenth century, and was thought to have influenced Martin Waldseemüller's world map of 1507, but the many texts on the map were illegible due to fading and damage, and thus its exact place in Renaissance cartography was impossible to determine. The new multispectral images have rendered many of the previously illegible texts on the map legible. I will explain why the Martellus map was an excellent candidate for multispectral imaging, describe the process of making the images, show some of the results, and give an account of the place of the Martellus map in late fifteenth- and early sixteenth-century cartography.Chet Van Duzer has published extensively on medieval and Renaissance maps in journals such as Imago Mundi, Terrae Incognitae and Word & Image. He is also the author of Johann Schöner's Globe of 1515: Transcription and Study, the first detailed analysis of one of the earliest surviving terrestrial globes that includes the New World; and (with John Hessler) Seeing the World Anew: The Radical Vision of Martin Waldseemüller's 1507 & 1516 World Maps. His book Sea Monsters on Medieval and Renaissance Maps was published in 2013 by the British Library, and in 2014 the Library of Congress published a study of Christopher Columbus's Book of Privileges which he co-authored with John Hessler and Daniel De Simone. His current book projects are a study of Henricus Martellus's world map of c. 1491 at Yale University, and the commentary for a facsimile of the 1550 manuscript world map by Pierre Desceliers, which will be published by the British Library.(Wednesday, March 18th, 7:00 PM to 10:00 PM -Carlson Auditorium)
3/18/2015 - Digital Humanities Distinguished Speaker Series
March 18, 2015
Dr. Chet Van Duzer“New Light on Henricus Martellus's World Map at Yale (c. 1491): Multispectral Imaging and Early Renaissance Cartography”In this talk I will give an account of a recent NEH-funded project to make multispectral images of a world map made by Henricus Martellus in about 1491, which is held by the Beinecke Library at Yale. This large map has long been thought to be one of the most important of the fifteenth century, and was thought to have influenced Martin Waldseemüller's world map of 1507, but the many texts on the map were illegible due to fading and damage, and thus its exact place in Renaissance cartography was impossible to determine. The new multispectral images have rendered many of the previously illegible texts on the map legible. I will explain why the Martellus map was an excellent candidate for multispectral imaging, describe the process of making the images, show some of the results, and give an account of the place of the Martellus map in late fifteenth- and early sixteenth-century cartography.Chet Van Duzer has published extensively on medieval and Renaissance maps in journals such as Imago Mundi, Terrae Incognitae and Word & Image. He is also the author of Johann Schöner's Globe of 1515: Transcription and Study, the first detailed analysis of one of the earliest surviving terrestrial globes that includes the New World; and (with John Hessler) Seeing the World Anew: The Radical Vision of Martin Waldseemüller's 1507 & 1516 World Maps. His book Sea Monsters on Medieval and Renaissance Maps was published in 2013 by the British Library, and in 2014 the Library of Congress published a study of Christopher Columbus's Book of Privileges which he co-authored with John Hessler and Daniel De Simone. His current book projects are a study of Henricus Martellus's world map of c. 1491 at Yale University, and the commentary for a facsimile of the 1550 manuscript world map by Pierre Desceliers, which will be published by the British Library.(Wednesday, March 18th, 7:00 PM to 10:00 PM -Carlson Auditorium)
3/19/2015 - If All of Rochester Reads the Same Book
March 19, 2015
Author visit by Karen Thompson Walker: reading followed by Q&A and book signing(Thursday, March 19th, 3:00 PM to 5:00 PM - Reading Room )
3/19/2015 - Women's History Month Reading
March 19, 2015
Our monthly English-department-sponsored faculty/student reading series continues with a round-robin reading celebrating Women's History Month, hosted by Paulette Swartzfager. Come join us for a celebration of RIT creativity, and enjoy some pizza, too! (Thursday, March 19th, 5:00 PM to 6:30 PM -Student Life Center)
3/26/2015 - CLA Hale Ethics Lecture Series
March 26, 2015
"Sketch and Defense of a Divergentist Moral Realism"Jon Tresan (Philosophy, University of Rochester) Professor Tresan sketches a novel version and defense of objective moral realism. Objective moral realists posit an independent moral reality. In principle they could say that they alone, or some sect or cultural tradition (like Western Civilization), are aware of that reality. But in practice they assume that moralizing – thinking, talking, and caring about morality – is panhuman (robustly cross-cultural). This has a significant implication, especially for those realists who are naturalists. For it commits them to properties (e.g., moral wrongness) which are (i) natural, (ii) instantiated, (iii) extensionally thus-and-so (e.g., had by brutality, betrayal, neglect, hogging, shirking, etc.), and (iv) the object of panhuman moralizing (e.g., of non-ulterior con-attitudes like indignation and shame, and of judgments used to display, guide, and mobilize those attitudes). Call the posit of such properties “convergentism”. Convergentism is wholly empirical, and problematically so. Professor Tresan describes and defends a version of “divergentist” realism: descriptive relativist, convergence-maker-avoiding, and thus non-convergentist. The core idea is that moral judgments and properties are in important ways like those involving units of length (e.g., inches, feet, meters, and judgments about them). The properties (e.g., being an inch) are objectively real natural properties and the judgments ascribe (just) those properties (saying "it's an inch" is just saying that it's an inch). (Thursday, March 26th, 3:30 PM to 5:00 PM - Eastman Hall, 01-2000 )
3/26/2015 - Philosophy Lecture
March 26, 2015
Professor Jon Tresan (University of Rochester), “Sketch and Defense of a Divergentist Moral Realism”(Thursday, March 26th, 3:30 PM to 5:00 PM - Eastman 2000 )