About

Events

Fall Open House of the Women's and Gender Studies Program
September 29, 2016
An opportunity to meet other faculty and staff members interested in issues in Women's and Gender Studies and to learn more about the program itself (Thursday, September 29th, 10:00 AM to 12:00 PM - Other LBR-1251 McKenzie Commons)
CLA Gosnell Lecture Series
September 29, 2016
The College of Liberal Arts Gosnell Lecture Series presents Mary E. Lovely Chair, International Relations Program Melvin A. Eggers Faculty Scholar & Professor of Economics Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs Syracuse University   Thursday, September 29th Time:      3:00 – 4:00 pm Place:      SAU                 1829 Room Topic: “Import Competition from and Offshoring to Low-Income Countries:  Implications for US Manufacturing Employment” In this talk, Dr. Mary E.  Lovely provides an overview of recent trends in US manufacturing employment and in US imports from low-income countries, especially the People’s Republic of China.  She then offers several conceptual lenses useful in understanding how trade with low-income countries influences US manufacturing jobs.  The discussion proceeds to consideration of the evidence available for each explanation, concluding with an overview of what we learn from this evidence and what questions remain open Interpreters provided upon request subject to availability. Please make your request TODAY by going to the following website myAccess.rit.edu. (Thursday, September 29th, 3:00 PM to 4:00 PM - Student Alumni Union (SAU) 1829 Room)
CLA Gosnell Lecture Series
September 29, 2016
The College of Liberal Arts Gosnell Lecture Series presents Randall Jackson Director, Regional Research Institute Professor, Geology & Geography West Virginia University Thursday, September 29th Time:           3:00 – 4:00 pm Place:          Liberal Arts Hall                      Room A205 (Basement Level) Object Orientation, Open Science, and Cumulative Knowledge Building Because so many present and future challenges are regional in scope, regional solutions will be needed, and the next 50 years of research at the regional level will only grow in importance. In the future, appropriate regional scales will be supranational, national, and subnational, many global problems will require localized solutions, and there will be an increasing recognition of the importance of integrating multi-scale human and physical systems models, recognizing that economic and environmental sustainability are inseparable. Models of systems of integrated systems will play an increasingly prominent role. Future modeling research will move away from individual efforts and toward projects that leverage new technologies that support group development and intelligence. The cumulative knowledge-building promise of open source and open science dwarfs that of the individual and small team research silos of the past. The collective development of software tools like Linux, Python and R libraries, and PySAL, to name just a few, is well underway, and fledgling models integrating human and environmental systems are clearly on the horizon. This chapter presents our vision of the path forward in integrated systems modeling, founded on the open source, open science, object oriented modeling triumvirate, using a dynamic interindustry space time economic model to focus the discussion.     Interpreters provided upon request subject to availability. Please make your request TODAY by going to the following website myAccess.rit.edu. (Thursday, September 29th, 3:00 PM to 4:00 PM - Other 06-A205)
CLA Gosnell Lecture Series
September 29, 2016
The College of Liberal Arts Gosnell Lecture Series presents Mary E. Lovely Chair, International Relations Program Melvin A. Eggers Faculty Scholar & Professor of Economics Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs Syracuse University Thursday, September 29th Time:      3:00 – 4:00 pm Place:      SAU                 1829 Room   Topic: “Import Competition From and Offshoring to Low-Income Countries:  Implications for US Manufacturing Employment” In this talk, Dr. Mary E.  Lovely provides an overview of recent trends in US manufacturing employment and in US imports from low-income countries, especially the People’s Republic of China.  She then offers several conceptual lenses useful in understanding how trade with low-income countries influences US manufacturing jobs.  The discussion proceeds to consideration of the evidence available for each explanation, concluding with an overview of what we learn from this evidence and what questions remain open.   Interpreters provided upon request subject to availability. Please make your request TODAY by going to the following website myAccess.rit.edu. (Thursday, September 29th, 3:00 PM to 4:00 PM - Student Alumni Union (SAU) 1829 Room)
CLA Hale Lecture Series
September 29, 2016
College of Liberal Arts Hale Lecture Series presents James Walker Depaul University Department of Philosophy & Peace, Justice, and Conflict Studies Program Thursday, September 29th 4:00 – 5:30 pm Campus Center Bamboo Room (Rm. 2610)   Decolonizing Conflict Narratives: Towards a Phenomenology of Peace For centuries, those interested in the moral analysis of the use of military force - in particular the question of jus ad bellum - have relied upon a conceptual framework known as "just war theory." It is the contention of this paper that this framework ultimately presupposes a manner of narrating conflict that dehumanizes those subjects living within the boundaries of those situations the ethicist aims to analyze from that theoretical perspective. Just war theory forces us to view the situations we are attempting to analyze in a manner that smuggles in problematic colonial presuppositions about subjects and the essential power relations that are fundamental to conflict and the struggle for peace in the lived world. After teasing out the problematic colonial presuppositions of just war theorizing, this paper will begin sketching an alternative manner of engaging in the moral conceptualization of war that relies on a phenomenological analysis of peace that emphasizes the strategizing and maneuvering of subjects "on the ground" as they live within the complex web of power relations that is fundamental to those subjects' notions of self and place in the world. In developing these points, cases from the web of conflicts that has continued to engulf the Great Lakes Region of Africa will be utilized. FREE & OPEN TO THE PUBLIC Interpreters provided upon request & subject to availability. Please make your request TODAY by going to Access.rit.edu. (Thursday, September 29th, 4:00 PM to 5:30 PM - Campus Center Bamboo Room, 2610)
CLA Hale Lecture Series
September 29, 2016
CLA Hale Lecture Series presents James Walker Depaul University Department of Philosophy & Peace, Justice, & Conflict Studies Program Thursday, September 29th 4:00 – 5:30 pm Campus Center Bamboo Room (Rm. 2610) Decolonizing Conflict Narratives: Towards a Phenomenology of Peace For centuries, those interested in the moral analysis of the use of military force - in particular the question of jus ad bellum - have relied upon a conceptual framework known as "just war theory." It is the contention of this paper that this framework ultimately presupposes a manner of narrating conflict that dehumanizes those subjects living within the boundaries of those situations the ethicist aims to analyze from that theoretical perspective. Just war theory forces us to view the situations we are attempting to analyze in a manner that smuggles in problematic colonial presuppositions about subjects and the essential power relations that are fundamental to conflict and the struggle for peace in the lived world. After teasing out the problematic colonial presuppositions of just war theorizing, this paper will begin sketching an alternative manner of engaging in the moral conceptualization of war that relies on a phenomenological analysis of peace that emphasizes the strategizing and maneuvering of subjects "on the ground" as they live within the complex web of power relations that is fundamental to those subjects' notions of self and place in the world. In developing these points, cases from the web of conflicts that has continued to engulf the Great Lakes Region of Africa will be utilized. FREE & OPEN TO THE PUBLIC Interpreters provided upon request & subject to availability. Please make your request TODAY by going to Access.rit.edu. (Thursday, September 29th, 4:00 PM to 5:30 PM - Student Life Center Bam)
The Stan McKenzie Salon Series: Dr. Katie Terezakis presents, "Everyone's an Idealist" 10/5/2016 4-6 PM
October 5, 2016
Realism, in philosophy, represents the view that reality is independent of human actors. Idealism, in its later modern forms, represents the view that regardless of what the truth is, we rely upon uniform mental intermediaries to know it. When we actually know something, we can identify the conceptual conditions for knowing it per se. These conceptual orders are non-negotiable; they never disappear even when they disappear from notice. Yet both people of common sense and most realist philosophers distrust idealism insofar as it posits a barrier between our knowledge and the real world. Why, they ask, must conceptual frameworks necessarily affect what we encounter directly, via our senses? The empirically minded naturalist and the antiauthoritarian meet in suspicion of the limits idealism imposes. And yet, I argue, any time we distinguish an experience or define a concept, we do, in fact, rely upon formal activities best defined in the idealist tradition. We rely as well upon tools. These media don’t just extend our agency; they help shape the constitution of every inquiry we launch. An account of functioning tools provides the missing link between an idealism that otherwise appears preternatural and a naturalism that otherwise cannot justify its knowledge claims. This is significant, because it means, for example, that when we use numbers to do math or formulate models to orient our goals, we must conscript systems to structure information as information. Only by way of these systems and their vehicles can we identify things and recognize relationships, including between the things we already know and the things we do not yet know. This talk draws from the concluding chapters of my current book project to defend a form of idealism as it is embodied in our everyday actions and tools. While no mind thinks unaided by fundamental conceptual structures, I make the case that we all become savvier and more able when we come to terms with them—that is, when we acknowledge and study our idealist commitments.    (Wednesday, October 5th, 4:00 PM to 6:00 PM - Other Stan McKenzie Comons)
Mirage of Police Reform: Procedural Justice and Police Legitimacy
October 6, 2016
The exercise of police authority, and public trust that police authority is used properly, are recurring issues in the U.S.  Contemporary prescriptions for police reform hold that the public would better trust the police, and feel a greater obligation to comply and cooperate with police, if police-citizen interactions were marked by higher levels of procedural justice by police.  Based on our study of measuring and managing procedural justice in two upstate New York police departments, we conclude that the procedural justice model of reform is a mirage, appearing from a distance to offer relief from strained police-community relations, but at close proximity to police organizations and police-citizen interactions, the relief offered by such reform proves illusory. Professor Robert Worden will be discussing the promises and pitfalls of procedural justice. There will be about 45 minutes of lecture followed by discussion until about 6:30pm. Robert E. Worden is the director of the John F. Finn Institute for Public Safety, Inc., and associate professor of criminal justice at the University at Albany, State University of New York. He holds a Ph.D. in political science from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.  Professor Worden’s interests revolve around questions about the accountability and responsiveness of criminal justice institutions to the public. His scholarship has appeared in Justice Quarterly, Criminology, Law & Society Review, and other academic journals, and his research has been funded by the National Institute of Justice, the Bureau of Justice Assistance, the New York State Division of Criminal Justice Services, and other sponsors.     (Thursday, October 6th, 5:00 PM to 6:30 PM - Gleason Hall 2580)
How Politics Really Works: An Insider's View
October 20, 2016
RIT's Center for Statesmanship, Law, and Liberty presents “How Politics Really Works: An Insider’s View” October 20th, 2016 10:00 a.m. - 2:15 p.m. Ingle Auditorium A panel of current and former government officials will share insights from their experience in elective office. Confirmed panelists include Former Lt. Governor Bob Duffy, NYS Senator Rich Funke, Assembly Minority Leader Brian Kolb and former Rochester Mayor Tom Richards. Q&A to be followed by a discussion: “A Comparison and Contrast Between Salesmanship in Business and Government” led by Lee Chen, VP of Sales at Rochester Midlands Corporation. FREE & OPEN TO THE PUBLIC Interpreters provided upon request & subject to availability. Please make your request TODAY by going to Access.rit.edu. (Thursday, October 20th, 10:00 AM to 2:30 PM - Student Alumni Union (SAU) Ingle Auditorium)