German

Willkommen beim Deutschprogramm!

Welcome to the German Program!

The German Language

German is the language with the most native speakers in Europe. It is the native language of Germany, Austria and Switzerland and surrounding areas - and is spoken as a second language by millions. High (standard) German is spoken primarily in the media. All printed materials also use standard German. In informal spoken contexts, regional variations tend to be used. It is often possible to pinpoint where exactly (which state, or even which city) a person is from just by paying attention to her/his pronunciation and vocabulary. A recent trend towards regionalism has brought traditional dialects back into focus, and there are poets and singers who write and sing exclusively in the dialect of their region. The language is also deeply affected by English borrowings - among young people, it is considered "cool" to add English words to one's speech.

Two of the most interesting features of the German language are that

  • In many instances, German word order requires the main verb to be placed at the end - so it is quite difficult to interrupt a person.
  • In German, you can easily and quickly create new words with very specific meanings simply by attaching more words to a first noun. In English, we have even adopted some of these words: for example the words Schadenfreude or Weltschmerz. A splendid example of such a "string word" is: "Donaudampfschiffahrtsgesellschaftskapitänsmütze" (roughly: the hat of a captain on a steam ship company that travels on the Danube).

Top 5 reasons to learn German:

  1. Germany is the largest economy of Europe and the world's fourth-largest economy. If you want to do business in Germany, it helps to know the language and culture.
  2. Knowing German creates business opportunities. More than 2,000 major American firms do business in German-speaking countries. More than 1,100 German companies do business in the US, providing an estimated 700,000 jobs for Americans.
  3. 18% of all books published in the world are in German.
  4. Germany - "the land of poets and thinkers" - or Das Land der Dichter und Denker. Some German-speaking composers were Bach, Beethoven, Händel, Mozart, Schumann, Schubert, Mendelssohn, Brahms, Wagner and R. Strauss. Some of the world's greatest philosophers include Kant, Hegel, Schopenhauer, Nietzsche, and Heidegger, all from Germany. And the writers Goethe, Schiller, Hesse, Rilke, Kafka, Thomas Mann and Max Frisch wrote in German, as did the reformer Martin Luther. Read them in the original!
  5. German-speaking scientists have won 37 Nobel Prizes in Physics, 38 in Chemistry, and 30 in Medicine. Germany is also a leader in sustainability and the development of alternative energy as well as in science and technology. Speaking German will help you have better access to innovations in these fields.

Instructors

Dr. Hiroko Yamashita
Chair of MLC, Professor of Japanese
Language taught:
Japanese
Office: EAS-3239
Phone number:
585-475-6074
Afrah Alfatli
Adjunct Professor of Arabic
Language taught:
Arabic
Office: 1-3219
Phone number:
585.475.2903
Natala Arapov
Natalya Arapov
Adjunct Professor of Russian
Language taught:
Russian
Office: EAS-3219
Phone number:
585-475-3219
Godys Argmengot
Godys Armengot Mejía
Lecturer of Spanish
Language taught:
Spanish
Office: EAS-3236
Phone number:
585-475-7627
Dr. Sara Armengot
Dr. Sara Armengot
Associate Professor of Spanish
Language taught:
Spanish
Office: EAS-3223
Phone number:
585-475-4343
Sandra Bradley
ASL Advisor
Language taught:
ASL
Office: LBJ-3616
Phone number:
Videophone: (585) 266-4551
Jo Bussler
Adjunct Professor of German
Language taught:
German
Office: G. Eastman Hall Rm. 3254
Phone number:
585-475-2903
Roberto Camps
Adjunct Professor of Spanish
Language taught:
Spanish
Office: EAS-3219
Phone number:
585-475-2903
Dr. Philippe Chavasse
Associate Professor of French, French Program Coordinator
Language taught:
French
Office: EAS-3233
Phone number:
585-475-3156
Dr. Zhong Chen
Assistant Professor of Chinese, Chinese Program Coordinator
Language taught:
Chinese
Office: EAS-3179
Phone number:
585-475-6917
Dr. Elisabetta D'Amanda
Principal Lecturer of Italian, Italian Program Coordinator
Language taught:
Italian
Office: EAS-3152
Phone number:
Birgit Deir
Adjunct Professor of German
Language taught:
German
Office: G. Eastman Hall Rm. 3219
Phone number:
585-475-4427
Patricia Durr
Deaf Cultural Studies Advisor
Language taught:
ASL
Office: LBJ-1283
Phone number:
Videophone: (585) 286-4693
Nadia Eldabh
Adjunct Professor of Arabic
Language taught:
Arabic
Office: EAS (Building 1) Room 3219
Phone number:
475-2903
Dr. Diane J. Forbes
Dr. Diane J. Forbes
Associate Professor Spanish, Spanish Program Coordinator
Language taught:
Spanish
Office: EAS-3197
Phone number:
585-475-6765
Vincent Incardona
Systems Administrator
Office: EAS-3241/ EAS-3263
Phone number:
585-475-7880
Mizuho Johnson
Adjunct Professor of Japanese
Language taught:
Japanese
Office: EAS-3211
Phone number:
475-2903
Wibke Klapetzky
Adjunct Professor of German
Language taught:
German
Office: EAS-3219
Phone number:
585-475-2903
Alexandra Kuzmich
Adjunct faculty of French
Language taught:
French and German
Office: GAN 3279
Phone number:
(585) 475-5438
Kévin Le Blévec
Lecturer of French/Technology Specialist
Language taught:
French
Office: EAS-3260
Phone number:
585-475-7234
Yu Fang Liu
Adjunct Professor of Chinese
Language taught:
Chinese
Office: EAS-3219
Phone number:
585-475-2903
Francia Gonzalez
Francia Marrot
Adjunct Professor of Spanish
Language taught:
Spanish
Office: EAS-3211
Phone number:
475-2903
Yukiko Maru
Yukiko Maru
Principal Lecturer of Japanese, Japanese Program Coordinator
Language taught:
Japanese
Office: EAS-3329
Phone number:
585-475-4558
Daniela Morschbacher
SILP Adjunct Professor of Portuguese
Language taught:
Portuguese
Office: EAS-3219
Phone number:
dxmgsl@rit.edu
Masako Murakami
Masako Murakami
Senior Lecturer of Japanese, Japanese Program Coordinator
Language taught:
Japanese
Office: EAS-3158
Phone number:
585-475-4418
Ping H. Pian
Adjunct Professor of Chinese
Language taught:
Chinese
Office: EAS-3219
Phone number:
585-475-2903
Kana Toda Pierce
Adjunct Professor of Japanese
Language taught:
Japanese
Office: G. Eastman Hall Rm. 3219
Phone number:
585-475-3219
Rosalba Pisaturo
Adjunct Professor of Italian, Adjunct Professor of Spanish
Language taught:
Italian, Spanish
Office: EAS-3219
Phone number:
585-475-4427
Linda Rossiter
Modern Langues and Cultures Sr. Staff Assistant
Office: EAS-3225
Phone number:
585-475-2018
Yolanta Samek
Adjunct Professor of French
Language taught:
French
Office: EAS-3219
Phone number:
585-475-3219
Dr. Ulrike Stroszeck
Dr. Ulrike Stroszeck
Principal Lecturer of German, German Program Coordinator
Language taught:
German
Office: EAS-3156
Phone number:
585-475-2921
Marina Sweany
Adjunct Professor of Russian
Language taught:
Russian
Office: EAS-3219
Phone number:
585-475-4427
Dr. Guoming Tian
Adjunct Professor of Chinese
Language taught:
Chinese
Office: EAS-3189
Phone number:
585-475-4092
Miriam Santana Valadez
Adjunct Professor of Spanish
Language taught:
Spanish
Office: 2282 LBJ Hall
Phone number:
585-475-6365v/tty
Dr. Marie-Josephe Van Vliet
Dr. Marie-Josephe Van Vliet
Adjunct Professor of French
Language taught:
French
Office: EAS-3219
Phone number:
585-475-2903
Mihoko Wakabayashi
Adjunct Professor of Japanese
Language taught:
Japanese
Office: EAS-3219
Phone number:
585-475-4427
Ai-ze Wang
Adjunct Professor of Chinese
Language taught:
Chinese
Office: EAS-3211
Phone number:
475-2903
Wilma Wierenga
Associate Professor Emeritus
Language taught:
German
Phone number:
Ida Wilder
Adjunct Professor of Italian
Language taught:
Italian
Office: EAS-3219
Phone number:
58-5475-4427

Conversation Table

The MLC Department offers weekly opportunities to practice conversations in specific languages with other students.

Der Deutsche Kaffetreff : Tuesdays 4-5pm in room EAS 3171.

Tutoring

The MLC Department offers free tutoring opportunities for students two times a week for one hour.

Tutor : Adriana

Wednesdays 11am-12pm in room EAS 3181
Thursdays, 1pm-2pm in room 3191

Resources

German In A Business Environment

When conducting business, you want to be able to tell your side of the story in German and listen in when your partners are speaking their native tongue. And having a background in German language and cultural studies is always an impressive way to signal your motivation and your communication skills to prospective employers.

 Here are the numbers:

  • German investment in the United States exceeds $210 billion.
  • U.S. investment in Germany in 2008 was 111 billion Euros.
  • Germany is the largest European trading partner of the U.S., with more than 750 American firms doing business there.
  • Germany is the third largest trading partner of the U.S. in the world.
  • The United States imports more from Germany than from any other European country and is the second largest market for German exports ($78 billion).
  • More than 1,100 companies from German-speaking countries have subsidiaries in the U.S., employing some 1 million Americans directly (plus 8.6 million indirectly), according to recent figures from the Center for Transatlantic Relations.
  • The best-known German firms with subsidiaries in the U.S. include: Adidas, Aldi, Audi, Bayer, Braun, BMW, Daimler Chrysler, DHL, Hugo Boss, Lufthansa, Mercedes-Benz, Puma, T-Mobile, Porsche, Siemens, Volkswagen, Continental Tire, and Deutsche Bank.
  • More than 3,000 German companies have investments in the American market.
  • The volume of German mergers and acquisitions in the United States in 2007 was over 24 billion dollars (fourth after Canada, Britain and Australia—all English-speaking).
  • Profits for Germany’s 30 leading blue-chip companies climbed by about 12 percent last year to hit a new record.
  • Germany is the world’s second larger exporter, just behind China. Technological innovation and the high quality of German goods are the main reasons.
  • More than 45,000 international companies do business in Germany.
  • Germany is the most attractive place in Europe and third after the U.S. and China in the world for U.S. companies to invest, according to a survey conducted by the Boston Consulting Group. Reasons cited were the quality and reliability of the “Made in Germany” label as well as the country’s resilience.
  • About half of the 547 billion Euros of banknotes in the Euro region are spent in Germany, according to the Bundesbank.
  • Together with China, Germany hosts more trade shows than any other country in the world. 2/3 of the world’s leading trade fairs take place in Germany in cities such as Hanover, Frankfurt, and Berlin--including CeBIT, the world’s largest trade fair for information and communciation technology
  • Germany tops the list of European nations in the number of new patents registered last year, according to figures from the European Patent Office in Munich. German inventors registered over 33,000 new patents in 2011—fewer than only US inventors with 59,000 and Japanese inventors with 47,000 (compare the populations!). Germany frequently has more patent approvals per year than the next four European countries combined.
  • The World Economic Forum recently named the most competitive nations in the worldSwitzerland is number 1, Germany number 7, and Austria number 17.
  • The “Global Innovation Index” 2008 placed Germany in 2nd place (USA in 1st), Switzerland in 7th, and Austria in 15th. In last year’s survey, Germany was also in 2nd place.
  • Germany was recently named Europe’s most favorable manufacturing location for the foreseeable future by the firm Healy & Baker and in a recent issue of Newsweek as the second most powerful country in the world after the United States, based on many criteria, especially its economy.
  • Germany is Europe’s largest economy, world’s fifth largest, and the world’s third most technologically powerful economy after the U.S. and Japan.
  • Germany is renowned for its state-of-the-art transportation and telecommunications infrastructure, high-tech research and development labs, well-trained work force, and large domestic market. Eighty percent of German adults have a professional qualification.
  • The World Economic Forum’s 2011-2012 report notes that Germany is ranked an excellent 2nd for the quality of its infrastructure, boasting in particular first-rate facilities across all modes of transportation. Germany’s business sector is highly sophisticated, especially when it comes to production processes and distribution channels.
  • 200,000 businesses introduce new products on the German market each year.
  • Germany companies own some of your favorite consumer outlets including Trader Joes, Aldi, and Caribou and Peet’s Coffee.
  • The German company, Bertelsmann, owns the RTL Group (Europe’s number 1 broadcaster) and Random House (the world’s largest book publishing group), and Gruner + Jahr (Europe’s largest magazine publisher.)
  • Germany is one of the top three nations in research and development of high-tech products, the second among world leaders in both wind and solar power production and the world leader in solar photovoltaic panels.
  • Of the world’s 500 largest stock-market-listed companies measured by revenue (the Fortune Global 500), 50 are in German-speaking countries. 37 of the Fortune Global 500 are headquartered in Germany. In 2010 the ten largest were Volkswagen, Allianz, E.O.N., Daimler, Siemens, Metro, Deutsche Telekom, Munich Re, BASF, and BMW.
  • The eastern German city of Dresden has become Europe’s microchip center with its more than 765 semiconductor firms.
  • There are over 8 million internet domains with .de, which is only second to .com. German domain names are more popular than .net, .org, and .info.
  • More than 600 German films are active in the cutting-edge field of biotechnology. 115 of these are located in Munich alone.

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