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 Ezra A. Hale Chair
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Department of Philosophy
College of Liberal Arts
Rochester Institute of
   Technology
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Rochester NY 14623-5604

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Rochester Institute of Technology


Department of Philosophy

Last updated 2 September 2015

Coming Events

Unless otherwise noted, all events are free and open to the public.

Need a campus map?

Philosophy Club

Friday, 28 August 2015
5:00 pm

Lobby of the Eastman Building
(outside where you get the school IDs)

Thursday 10 September 2015
3:30 pm
Reading Room (2050 Center for Campus Life)

David B. Suits
(R.I.T.)

“Why We Have No Right to Not Be Killed”

I will present two versions of an argument that no one has a moral right to not be killed. Both versions are based on the claim of the philosopher Epicurus (341–270 BCE) that death is annihilation yet not something bad that ought to be avoided (nor is it a good thing that ought to be sought). And both versions make use of the fact that death is a special case where ethical matters are significantly different from non-death cases. But at the end, I will explain how killing a person can be an immoral act even though no one has a right to not be killed.

Sponsored by the Hale Chair in Applied Ethics

Thursday 24 September 2015
3:30 pm
Reading Room (2050 Center for Campus Life)

Lawrence Torcello
(R. I. T.)

“Aristotle’s Ethics”

Sponsored by the Hale Chair in Applied Ethics

Thursday 22 October 2015
3:30 pm
Reading Room (2050 Center for Campus Life)

Colin Mathers
(R.I.T.)

“Justifying Copyrights and Patents:
A Utility/Desert Hybrid Account”

Of the three basic moral concepts that can be used to defend the legitimacy of copyrights and patents—entitlement, desert, and utility—the most effective, when used alone, is utility. In fact, the justification in our Constitution—“to promote the progress of science and the useful arts”—is clearly utilitarian. Using colorful examples from the history of popular music and science, I will explain the inadequacy of using entitlement, desert or utility alone to defend the legitimacy of copyrights and patents. Treating copyrights and patents as rewards and exploiting parallels between punishments and rewards, I propose and defend a hybrid view employing utility and desert.

Sponsored by the Hale Chair in Applied Ethics

Friday 1 April 2016
Slaughter 2230-2240

7th RIT Undergraduate Philosophy Conference

Details, call for papers, etc.: TBA

Wednesday 4 May 2016
Time and place: TBA

José Medina

Title: TBA

For further information on upcoming events, contact

Professor Silvia Benso, Chair
Department of Philosophy
Email: silvia.benso@rit.edu
Office: 1118 College of Liberal Arts
Phone: (585) 475-4116