BS/MS Dual Degree with BS in Science/Engineering and MS in Science, Technology and Public Policy


Programs Offered (Click on program to see specifics.)

Dual Degrees with Science

 

Dual Degrees with Computing

 

Dual Degrees with Engineering

 

General Information on BS/MS Degrees

Why a BS/MS?

Throughout history, technology has been a major driver of social, political, and economic change. Societies around the globe employ public policies to solve problems and achieve their social, economic, and environmental objectives. The spheres of public policy and technology overlap as society is challenged to consider not only the role of new technologies in its quest for improved quality of life, but also how policies affect the development, emergence, and choice of new technologies. Because of the role engineers and scientists play in creating new technology, they increasingly have an important role in helping to shape public policy. Moreover, policies affecting how we as a society live and work—such as environmental, industrial, energy, and national security policy, to name a few—demand that scientists and engineers be prepared to integrate policy issues into their practice.

Yet the vast majority of engineers and scientists have little knowledge of public policy, and most policymakers have little firsthand knowledge about the many technologically-steeped decisions they make. This disparity was recently recognized by the National Academy of Engineering (NAE), the top engineering body in the country. The NAE has called for new curricula in engineering and public policy to bridge this gap.

In its recent report, Educating the Engineer of 2020, the NAE stated that engineering curricula that integrate public policy “could serve as a recruiting tool … [and] an optimum launch pad to challenging and rewarding professions – engineering first and foremost, but also medicine, law and business.” In noting the increased convergence between engineering and public policy, the NAE found:

This new level of interrelatedness necessitates that engineering, and engineers, develop a stronger sense of how technology and public policy interact. To date, engagement of engineers in public policy issues has been limited at best. It is both the responsibility of engineers and important to the image of the profession that engineers increase their ability to eloquently articulate the relevance of engineering to many public policy issues.

These dual degrees integrate scientific and technical knowhow with a public policy MS curriculum. The programs are supported by faculty in both the departments and on average take a total of five years to complete.  For engineers in 5 year programs, you add virtually no time for graduation.

This program is a natural fit that will enable qualified students enrolled in scientific and technical BS programs but interested in public policy issues to pursue a graduate level degree in a field that combines their technical and public policy interests.

The program is designed as an integrated dual degree program where qualified students begin taking MS courses in their fourth year. For most programs the students take a total of 150 credit hours.  A minimum of 120 undergraduate and 30 graduate credits are required by the state of New York.

A student will typically apply to the BS/MS degree program in their second year. Students are allowed to pursue the BS/MS option as long their GPA remains above a 3.0. 

Educational Benefits

RIT graduates are entering a competitive job market, one where research and development can and will increasingly be done in lower-cost countries. This degree provides the multi-disciplinary skills that can help a graduate differentiate themselves from their peers. This BS/MS degree is an educational opportunity for students seeking to become leaders at integrating engineering and science with government, policy, and the social sciences. 

Employment

Students who complete this BS/MS will be highly sought after by many public and private sector organizations. Government entities with science and technology program activities, such as the US Department of Energy, the Environmental Protection Agency, US Department of Transportation, NASA, and the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy will find our BS/MS students attractive because they can effectively maneuver in both the world of the engineer and the world of the policy analyst. Companies, particularly consulting firms, will find our BS/MS students desirable, as these students will be able to "bridge the gaps" between the engineering, scientific, policy, and business worlds. Graduates will be able to understand how policies shape product markets, and how policies can be developed that will lead to new scientific advances and markets for goods and services. Lastly, our BS/MS graduates will be uniquely prepared for continued training in professional schools, law and business, as well as Ph.D. programs.

How do I know if Public Policy is right for me?

If there is room in thier schedule, it is recommended that interested students (fits well in 1st and 2nd years, both are GenEd classes) take one or both of the following to get a feeling for public policy.
•    PUBL-101: Foundations of Public Policy
•    PUBL-201: Ethics, Values and Public Policy (counts as Ethics Perspective as well)
 

How do I apply?

Fill out the abbreviated application form (click "apply now").  To be accepted into the Public Policy MS program, students must have a 3.0 GPA (minimum) and be recommended by their home department as a strong candidate.

When should I apply?

Preferred course of study: It is best for the student’s course of study if they apply and are accepted into the program at the end of the second year or early in the third year.  This allows students to fit some of the important Public Policy courses into their 3rd and 4th year schedules.  We also suggest that any students interested in the joint degree take one of the PP general education classes (PUBL-101 or PUBL-201).  These courses count towards your GenEd requirements and are thus useful even if you do not pursue the MS degree.

What are the Public Policy Degree Requirements?

Public Policy degree requirements: The STPP MS degree requires 30 credit hours.  There are five required core courses, which must be taken using their graduate student course numbers (Policy Analysis, Decision Analysis, Readings in PP, Eval. and Research Design, and Sci., Tech., Policy).  In addition, students take three Public Policy electives (nine credits) and six credits of thesis research. The Public Policy MS normally requires a thesis, which is usually completed in the last semester of the degree. The thesis committee must have at least one Public Policy faculty member (but the PP faculty member does not need to be the chair).

 

Contact: Franz Foltz (fafgsh@rit.edu) is the PP Graduate Coordinator.  Interested students and applications should be forwarded to him for more detailed advising.

BS/MS Degrees We Offer:

Biomedical Engineering BS + Science, Technology, and Public Policy MS

Students graduating from the BS program in biomedical engineering will have a firm and practical grasp of engineering principles and underlying science associated with traditional biomedical engineering applications. The addition of the MS in Science, Technology and Public Policy will add another dimension to the students’ possible future opening the door to working in policy related fields, where their technical knowledge would provide them a great advantage.  They would also gain skills necessary for leadership roles in engineering.

The Biomedical Engineering, BS degree, requires a typical course sequence with a total of 129 semester credit hours.

The Science, Technology and Public Policy, MS degree requires a total of 30 semester credit hours.

In order to graduate in the same 5 years, that the BS would normally take, students will have one less co-op.  They will not have to go on co-op in spring of their fourth year.  They will also double count 9 credits for a total of 150 credits. (120 undergraduate and 30 graduate credit hours)

Click on the course grid below to see a sample course sequence:

 

       Engineering Program Champion           Public Policy Program Champion   

Iris Asllani

Application Lead-Healthcare

Domain-PhD Engineering,

Assistant Professor

Biomedical Engineering

Email: icabme@rit.edu

Phone: (585)-475-4924

Eric Hittinger

Assistant Professor

Department of Public Policy

Email: eshgpt@rit.edu

Phone: (585)-475-5312

 

 

Chemical Engineering BS + Science, Technology, and Public Policy MS

Students graduating from the BS program in chemical engineering will have a firm and practical grasp of engineering principles and underlying science associated with traditional chemical engineering applications, and will also learn to tie together phenomena at the nano-scale with the behavior of systems at the macro-scale. While chemical engineers have always excelled at analyzing and designing processes with multiple length scales, modern chemical engineering applications require this knowledge to be extended to the nano-scale, and our program addresses this emerging need.

The addition of the MS in Science, Technology and Public Policy will add another dimension to the students’ possible future opening the door to working in policy related fields, where their technical knowledge would provide them a great advantage.  They would also gain skills necessary for leadership roles in engineering.

The Chemical Engineering, BS degree, requires a typical course sequence with a total of 129 semester credit hours.

The Science, Technology and Public Policy, MS degree requires a total of 30 semester credit hours.

In order to graduate in the same 5 years, that the BS would normally take, students will have one less co-op.  They will not have to go on co-op in spring of their fourth year.  They will also double count 9 credits for a total of 150 credits. (120 undergraduate and 30 graduate credit hours).

See Example Course Schedule:

     Engineering Program Champion        Public Policy Program Champion   

Steve Weinstein

Professor, Department Head

Chemical Engineering

Email: sjweme@rit.edu

Phone: (585)-475-4299

Eric Hittinger

Assistant Professor

Department of Public Policy

Email: eshgpt@rit.edu

Phone: (585)-475-5312

 

Computer Engineering BS + Science, Technology, and Public Policy MS

Students earning a Bachelor of Science degree in computer engineering study aspects of both electrical engineering and computer science. They study areas in electrical engineering include circuits and electronics. In computer science, students take courses in data structures, and programming languages. They understand the fundamentals of both disciplines and how they are integrated with computer engineering specifically. RIT's undergraduate computer engineering curriculum prepares its graduates to intelligently incorporate hardware and software into engineering products through courses in computer architecture, digital systems, IC design, interfacing, computer communications networks, and real-time and embedded systems.

The addition of the MS in Science, Technology and Public Policy will add another dimension to the students’ possible future opening the door to working in policy related fields, where their technical knowledge would provide them a great advantage.  They would also gain skills necessary for leadership roles in engineering.

The computer Engineering, BS degree, requires a typical course sequence with a total of 129 semester credit hours.

The Science, Technology and Public Policy, MS degree requires a total of 30 semester credit hours.

In order to graduate in the same 5 years, that the BS would normally take, students will have one less co-op.  They will not have to go on co-op in spring of their fourth year.  They will also double count 9 credits for a total of 150 credits. (120 undergraduate and 30 graduate credit hours)

Click on the Course Grid Below to see a typical course sequence:

 

       Engineering Program Champion           Public Policy Program Champion   

Marcin Lukowiak

Associate Professor

Computer Engineering

Email: mxleec@rit.edu

Phone: (585)-475-2808

Eric Hittinger

Assistant Professor

Department of Public Policy

Email: eshgpt@rit.edu

Phone: (585)-475-5312

 

 

Mechanical Engineering BS + Science, Technology, and Public Policy MS

The BS program in Mechanical Engineering provides students with a broad academic base complemented by hands-on laboratory activities and cooperative education experience. Students devote their first two years to the study of mathematics, physics, chemistry, liberal arts, and engineering sciences, while the third and fourth years emphasize engineering science, design, and systems.

The addition of the MS in Science, Technology and Public Policy will add another dimension to the students’ possible future opening the door to working in policy related fields, where their technical knowledge would provide them a great advantage.  They would also gain skills necessary for leadership roles in engineering.

The Mechanical Engineering, BS degree, requires a typical course sequence with a total of 129 semester credit hours.

The Science, Technology and Public Policy, MS degree requires a total of 30 semester credit hours.

In order to graduate in the same 5 years, that the BS would normally take, students will have one less co-op.  They will not have to go on co-op in spring of their fourth year.  They will also double count 9 credits for a total of 150 credits. (120 undergraduate and 30 graduate credit hours)

 

Click the grid below to see an example course schedule.

 

Mechanical Engineering Program Champion       Public Policy Program Champion      

Michael Schrlau

Graduate Program Director-Mechanical Engineering, Associate Professor

Email: mgseme@rit.edu

Phone: 585-475-2139

Eric Hittinger

Assistant Professor

Department of Public Policy

Email: eshgpt@rit.edu

Phone: (585)-475-5312

 

 

Microelectronic Engineering BS + Science, Technology, and Public Policy MS

The Microelectronic Engineering core program at RIT offers a comprehensive curriculum with a blend of theoretical, laboratory and experiential learning.  The program has been carefully crafted to prepare students for immediate entry into the semiconductor industry workplace or to pursue advanced graduate study.  The unique qualifications of our graduates are highly sought after.

The addition of the MS in Science, Technology and Public Policy will add another dimension to the students’ possible future opening the door to working in policy related fields, where their technical knowledge would provide them a great advantage.  They would also gain skills necessary for leadership roles in engineering.

The Microelectronic Engineering, BS degree, requires a typical course sequence with a total of 129 semester credit hours.

The Science, Technology and Public Policy, MS degree requires a total of 30 semester credit hours.

In order to graduate in the same 5 years, that the BS would normally take, students will have one less co-op.  They will not have to go on co-op in spring of their fourth year.  They will also double count 9 credits for a total of 150 credits. (120 undergraduate and 30 graduate credit hours).

Click the grid below to see a typical course sequence:

 

Professor Robert Pearson

Dir. MicroE Prog

Email: repemc@rit.edu

Phone: 585-475-2923

Professor Eric Hittinger

Department of Public Policy

Email: eshgpt@rit.edu

Phone: (585)-475-5312

Industrial and Systems Engineering BS + Science, Technology, and Public Policy MS

Students graduating from the BS program in Industrial and Systems Engineering learn to engineer processes and systems that improve quality and productivity. They work to eliminate waste of time, money, materials, energy, and other commodities. Most important of all, IEs save companies money. The addition of the MS in Science, Technology and Public Policy will add another dimension to the students’ possible future opening the door to working in policy related fields, where their technical knowledge would provide them a great advantage.  They would also gain skills necessary for leadership roles in engineering.

The Industrial and Systems Engineering , BS degree, requires a typical course sequence with a total of 129 semester credit hours.

The Science, Technology and Public Policy, MS degree requires a total of 30 semester credit hours.

In order to graduate in the same 5 years, that the BS would normally take, students will have one less co-op.  They will not have to go on co-op in spring of their fourth year.  They will also double count 9 credits for a total of 150 credits. (120 undergraduate and 30 graduate credit hours).

See Example Course Schedule:

Engineering Program Champion    Public Policy Program Champion   

            

Brian Thorn

Professor

Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering

bkteie@rit.edu

585-475-6166

Eric Hittinger

Assistant Professor

Department of Public Policy

Email: eshgpt@rit.edu

Phone: (585)-475-5312

Electrical Engineering BS + Science, Technology, and Public Policy MS

Electrical engineering at RIT is a blend of the theoretical and experiential learning. The program has been carefully crafted to prepare electrical engineering students for immediate entry into the workplace, or to pursue advanced graduate study. The program prepares the student to become an engineer who can adapt to technological change and practice the profession with a social conscience.

The addition of the MS in Science, Technology and Public Policy will add another dimension to the students’ possible future opening the door to working in policy related fields, where their technical knowledge would provide them a great advantage.  They would also gain skills necessary for leadership roles in engineering.

The Electrical Engineering, BS degree, requires a typical course sequence with a total of 129 semester credit hours.

The Science, Technology and Public Policy, MS degree requires a total of 30 semester credit hours.

In order to graduate in the same 5 years, that the BS would normally take, students will have one less co-op.  They will not have to go on co-op in spring of their fourth year.  They will also double count 9 credits for a total of 150 credits. (120 undergraduate and 30 graduate credit hours).

Click the grid below to see a typical course sequence:

 

Jayanti Venkataraman

Professor

Graduate Program Director, Electrical Engineering

Email: jnveee@rit.edu

Phone: (585) 475-2143

Eric Hittinger

Assistant Professor

Department of Public Policy

Email: eshgpt@rit.edu

Phone: (585)-475-5312

Environmental Science BS + Science, Technology, and Public Policy MS

The Environmental Science program at RIT is where love of nature meets cutting-edge research to create a sustainable future for our planet. Future environmental leaders in industry, government, non-profit organizations and the media are drawn to this program for its unmatched strengths, including exciting field work, advanced technologies, multi-disciplinary problem solving cirriculum, and outstanding faculty.

The addition of the MS in Science, Technology and Public Policy will add another dimension to the students’ possible future opening the door to working in policy related fields, where their technical knowledge would provide them a great advantage.  They would also gain skills necessary for leadership roles in environmental science.

The Environmental Science, BS degree, requires a typical course sequence with a total of 125 semester credit hours.

The Science, Technology and Public Policy, MS degree requires a total of 30 semester credit hours.

The typical course sequence would be as follows:

First Year

ENVS-101  Concepts of Environmental Science

ENVS-111  Soil Science

BIOL-121  Intro to Biology I

LAS Foundation: First Year Seminar

ENVS-201  Environmental Workshop

MATH-161  Applied Calculus

BIOL-122  Intro to Biology II

LAS Perspective 1

LAS Foundation: First Year Writing

Wellness Education*

Second Year

STSO-220  Environment and Society

ENVS-250  Applications of Geographic Information Systems

BIOL-240  General Ecology

CHMG-141  G&A Chemistry I

CHMG-145  G&A Chemistry I Lab

STSO-421 or PUBL-210 Environmental Policy or Qualitative Methods and Analysis

ENVS-301  Environmental Science Field Skills

LAS Perspective 2

LAS Perspective 3

CHMG-142

G&A Chem II

CHMG-146

G&A Chem II Lab

Third Year

STSO-422  Great Lakes

STAT-145  Intro to Statistics I

Environmental Science Concentration I:

CHMO-231  Organic Chemistry I

CHMO-235  Organic Chemistry I Lab

LAS Perspective 4

STAT-146  Intro to Statistics II

LAS Immersion 1

ENVS-450  Hydro Apps. GIS

Concentration 2:

PUBL-702  Grad Decision Analysis

BIOL-475  Conservation Biology

Fourth Year

ENVS-551  Env. Sci. Capstone I

LAS Immersion 2

IMGS-431  Apps. Of Remate Sensing

PUBL-700  Readings in Public Policy

PUBL-701  Grad Policy Analysis

Concentration 3:  

ENVS-552  Env. Sci. Capstone II

Env. Sci. Concentration 4

LAS Immersion 3

PUBL-703  Evaluation and Research Design

Fifth Year

Public Policy Elective 1

Public Policy Elective 2

Public Policy Elective 3

Open Elective

STSO-710  Grad Sci Tech Policy Seminar

PUBL-790  Public Policy Thesis

Total Credit Hours:  146

 

Environmenal Science Program Champion      Public Policy Program Champion       

Anna Christina Tyler

Assistant Professor/Faculty Affiliate

College of Science

Email: actsbi@rit.edu

Phone: (585)-475-5042

Eric Hittinger

Assistant Professor

Department of Public Policy

Email: eshgpt@rit.edu

Phone: (585)-475-5312

 

 

 

Computing Security BS + Science, Technology, and Public Policy MS

The BS program in Computing Security is designed to produce graduates who will be experts in the identification of computer security vulnerabilities, the detection of computer security exploits, and the prevention or mitigation of the resulting attacks. Their coursework includes a complement of core courses which gives the students a firm foundation in the broad spectrum of computing including programming, scripting, databases, computing security, cryptography, security policy, networks, systems and network administration.

The addition of the MS in Science, Technology and Public Policy will add another dimension to the students’ possible future opening the door to working in policy related fields, where their technical knowledge would provide them a great advantage.  They would also gain skills necessary for leadership roles in engineering.

The Computing Security, BS degree, requires a typical course sequence with a total of 120 semester credit hours.

The Science, Technology and Public Policy, MS degree requires a total of 30 semester credit hours.

The typical course sequence would be as follows:

First Year

CSEC-101 Fundamentals of Computing Security

CSCI-141 Computer Science I   (counts as General Education Electives course 1) E-1

General Education Framework Foundation F-1

MATH-181 Project-Based Calculus I (General Education Perspectives course 7)  P-7A

General Education Framework Perspectives Course P-3

MATH-182 Project-Based Calculus II ( General Education Perspectives course 8)  P-7B   

MATH-190 Discrete Mathematics for Computing (General Education Electives course 3)   E-3  

CSCI-142 Computer Science II (counts as General Education Electives course 2) E-2   

Freshman Writing Intensive Course (General Education Framework Foundation)  F-2

NSSA-241 Introduction to Routing and Switching

Physical Education     

Second Year

CSCI-243 The Mechanics of Programming   

MATH-251 Probability and Statistics I (General Education Electives course)  E-4   

General Education Framework Perspectives Course P-4   

PHYS-211 University Physics I (General Education Perspectives Course 5) P-5   

NSSA-245 Network Services   

CSCI-250 Concepts of Computer Systems

NSSA-221 System Admin I

MATH-241 Linear Algebra  / MATH 252 Probability and Statistics II (General Education Electives course)   E-5

PHYS-212 University Physics II (General Education Perspectives Course 6) P-6

General Education Perspectives Course P-1

CSEC-099 Cooperative Education Seminar

Summer following Second Year

Co-op (10 weeks)

Third Year

CSCI-462-Introduction to Cryptography

CSEC Elective Course 1

Free Elective 1

General Education Perspectives Course P-2

ISTE-230 Intro Database and Data Modeling

CSEC-472 Authentication and Security Models

CSEC-363 Cyber Security Policy and Law

CSEC Elective Course 2

General Education Immersion course #1

Free Elective 2

Summer following Third Year

Co-op (10 weeks)

Fourth Year

CSEC Elective Course 3

CSEC Elective Course 4

General Education Course (PHIL 102/202/306) E-4

General Education Immersion course #2

PUBL-701: Policy Analysis

GCCIS-CSEC-490 Capstone in Computing Security

General Education Immersion course #3 

CSEC Elective Course 5

PP Grad Elective 1

PUBL-702 Grad: Decision Analysis

Fifth Year

CSEC Elective Course 6   

PUBL-703 Program Evaluation and Research Design   

PUBL-700 Readings Seminar PP    

PP Grad Elective 2   

PP Grad Elective    

Grad Seminar: Sci, Tech Policy   

Thesis

Physics BS + Science, Technology, and Public Policy MS

The BS program in Physics offers a broad curriculum which prepares students for employment in research, industry, or teaching after graduation, as well as for graduate study in physics and related areas. The structured core curriculum provides a broad and solid foundation in experimental, computational, and theoretical physics, with an emphasis on laboratory training and the development of analytical and problem-solving skills.

The Physics BS + Science, Technology, and Public Policy MS program is an integrated dual degree program where qualified students begin taking MS courses in their fourth year (or earlier). A total of 151 credit hours are required.  Students should typically apply to the BS/MS degree program in their second year or later.

First Year

COS-CHMG-141 General & Analytical Chemistry I (LAS-P5-A)

COS-MATH-181 Project-based Calculus I (LAS-P7-1)

COS-PHYS-150 Introduction to Special Relativity

First-year seminar (LAS-F1)

Liberal Arts and Sciences perspective (LAS-P1)

COS-CHMG-142 General & Analytical Chemistry II (LAS-P6-A)

COS-MATH-182 Project-based Calculus II (LAS-P7-2)

COS-PHYS-211 University Physics I (LAS-E1)

First-year writing intensive course (LAS-F2)(WI)

Second Year

COS-MATH-219 Multivariable Calculus (LAS-E2)

COS-PHYS-212 University Physics II (LAS-E3)

COS-PHYS-225 Introduction to Computational Physics and Programming

Liberal Arts and Sciences perspective (LAS-P2)

Liberal Arts and Sciences perspective (LAS-P3)

COS-MATH-231 Differential Equations (LAS-E4)

COS-PHYS-213 Modern Physics I

COS-PHYS-222 Electronic Measurements

COS-PHYS-275 Sophomore Physics Seminar

COS-PHYS-283 Vibrations and Waves

Liberal Arts and Sciences perspective (LAS-P4)

Third Year

COS-PHYS-214 Modern Physics II

COS-PHYS-315 Experiments in Modern Physics

COS-PHYS-320 Mathematical Methods in Physics

COS-PHYS-330 Classical Mechanics

Liberal Arts and Sciences immersion (LAS-I1)

COS-PHYS-316 Advanced Laboratory in Physics

COS-PHYS-411 Electricity and Magnetism

COS-PHYS-450 Capstone Preparation

COS-PHYS-xxx Lab/computation physics electives a

Liberal Arts and Sciences immersion (LAS-I2)

Fourth Year

COS-PHYS-414 Quantum Mechanics

COS-PHYS-440 Thermal and Statistical Physics

COS-PHYS-451 Capstone Project I

CLA-PUBL-701 Graduate Policy Analysis

CLA-PUBL-700 Readings in PP

COS-PHYS-452 Capstone Project II (WI)

COS-PHYS-xxx Physics elective c

CLA-PUBL-702 Graduate Decision Analysis

CLA-STSO-710 Grad Sci Tech Policy Seminar

CLA-PUBL-703 Evaluation and Research Design

Fifth Year

COS-PHYS-xxx Physics elective b

Open elective

Public Policy Elective 1

Public Policy Elective 2

CLA-PUBL-790 Thesis Research

Liberal Arts and Sciences immersion (LAS-I3)

Liberal Arts and Sciences elective (LAS-E5)

Public Policy Elective 3

CLA-PUBL-790 Thesis Research

OR

Non-Thesis Option*

2 additional Graduate electives plus required comprehensive examination

          Physics Program Champion             Public Policy Program Champion   

Dr. Dawn Hollenbeck

Associate Professor

Undergraduate Program Coordinator

Email: dmhsps@rit.edu

Phone: (585)-475-6652

Eric Hittinger

Assistant Professor

Department of Public Policy

Email: eshgpt@rit.edu

Phone: (585)-475-5312