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Everlasting Stone Coffin

In Mount Hope Cemetery, here lies Solomon Levy. I visited the cemetery at night, and there were many graves that I stopped to look at while walking around but this particular one stood out to me. Upon closer inspection, it appeared that his “tombstone’ was a stone coffin, draped with a stone “blanket”, sporting lion’s feet atop a platform. The grave reveals that he was born in Germany on September 29, 1826, and died December 28, 1898. The intriguing part, however, was the chosen inscription displayed:

THE SWEET REMEMBRANCE

OF THE JUST

SHALL LIVE

WHEN INGRATES SLEEP IN DUST

Someone clearly took the time to carve out such a majestic and ominous gravesite for Solomon to rest in. A quick look online reveals that there are numerous pictures on the internet of Solomon Levy’s monument. According to Hess in In digital remembrance: vernacular memory and the rhetorical construction of web memorials, “memorials serve an agenda-setting function by their presence”. He points out that the very existence of the text calls attention to itself, and that’s what happens with Levy’s memorial monument.

I would say that it suggests that Levy was a just person, and that those who wronged him will sleep in dust while he will live on forever. I feel that society as a whole today would agree with this statement about themselves. However, there isn’t much known about him from looking at his tomb- was he a beloved son, husband, father? Or was the fact that he was “just” enough to remember him by? The engraver at the time may have thought exactly just that. Perhaps the lack of detail on this unique site draws visitors in.

Andi

Comments

Kelly
Reply

First, I’d like to commend your bravery for visiting Mt. Hope at night! I don’t think I’d be able to visit after dark.

This monument is very interesting and beautiful, and definitely stands out against the majority of memorials in Mt. Hope. Like you said, there isn’t much text about the man entombed here, but there are symbols present that may give us more information on his life, such as the masonic symbol.

Joelle
Reply

I saw this when I was there– we couldn’t tell what that was! It looked like a bathtub to me and my friend, Renee. I love that you also were drawn to this grave site!

Jonathan
Reply

I find this memorial incredibly fascinating, as well as that you went to Mt. Hope at Night. Having been there myself, it is really a different experience. I didn’t see Levy’s coffin, but it is amazing the implied significance of the monument, and incredible how there is little to be known about him aside from what can be gathered about his Masonic and Jewish ties and his origins. It causes you to really think…

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