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Veterans Memorial Bridge

Bridge Carthage Communication Expressway Genesee Keeler Memorial RIT Road Roadway Rochester Route 104 Rt 104 Transportation Veteran Veterans Visual War

Veterans’ Memorial Bridge was constructed in the early 1930′s as a tribute and memorial to those who served in World War I, just north of the former site of the port of Carthage on the Genesee River. It is now part of the modern Keeler St. Expressway/Route 104. This bridge was designed on a colossal scale, with little text representing the purpose of the structure. From below, the semi-circular arch makes a nearly-complete circle in its reflection, as if to signify the unity of the world after the loss of life in the first world war. The location of this bridge is rather interesting, as it is near the main body of the former Kodak manufacturing campus and Carthage used to be the busiest port on Lake Ontario in the mid-19th Century. The Biesecker reading examines corporate response to “The Greatest Generation” and the rise of American ideology post World War II. Seeing this memorial reminded me of the aging underpinnings of what shaped the US, how it is now some 80 years old and relatively forgotten, and spans some of the harder neighborhoods in the city, yet “the Great War” is barely a memory, even to the residents of Seneca Towers.

Jonathan

Comments

Bryan
Reply

After looking at this and talking to you today I realized I have been here, this is a very cool site and it looks like you really got into many of its nooks and crannies! That’s an apt word you use – colossal to describe this thing, it’s almost Brutalist in structure. The horrors of WWI are largely overshadowed by WWII – so, what’s wrong with that Generation? Brokaw’s Greatest Generation, while honoring our own fathers and grandfathers who fought so proudly, indirectly insults their ancestors who fought and served their country no less valiantly. This belies another significant issue with Brokaw’s lexicon – are you not a good citizen if you do not make war? Is it simply civil duty to blindly follow the whims of politicians even if they seem just? Does the Greatest Generation include the thousands of interred Japanese Americans? I never really had a problem with Brokaw until I started thinking about this haha!

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