Weed

Much has been reported, said and written of late about weed. Including the present Blog. Now openly commodified in several states, whether for medicinal or recreational use, regulators find interest in the substance as much as do growers, distributors and retailers.

As a kid, I hated pulling weeds. Well, I probably disliked most household and yard chores. But weeds, especially.

As a lad, my father tasked me with tugging out the weeds that grew in profusion in our gravel driveway. Each one had roots about two or three feet long, I’m sure.

As an adult, my first two houses each had paved driveways. Instead of weeding them, which was not required, I diligently seal coated them regularly.

The driveway built onto a hillside so steep it drove me to four-wheel drive was especially “interesting” to seal.

Now my third house has an L-shaped gravel driveway. I live in a suburb, not the country. But all the trees on my property offer a rustic setting into which the house is nested.

So the gravel remains. As it would seem sacrilegious to install macadam. Not to mention expensive.

And every few years, after the winter season’s snowplowing has meticulously removed every last stone from the driveway, I order nine or ten tons of oughts and ones (technical jargon for what anyone else would call “itty bitty” stones and stone dust) delivered and spread on the driveway.

But before that bit of home maintenance occurs, weed populates my driveway, due to the unfettered-by-stones expanse of dirt.

One would suspect dumping the nine-plus tons of new gravel, up to two inches deep, might act as both barrier and deterrent to weed growth.

I am here to testify this is not so.

Weed is the operational definition for “persistent.”

And so now a grown adult, I spend Sunday mornings pulling weeds from my driveway. Enjoying it every bit as much as I did a half century ago.

Now, what am I too conclude from all of this? That coming full circle means a head-on collision? That weed had little medicinal or recreational value?