Problem Solved

Remember the awkward, uncomfortable moment – maybe minutes – when you’re alone with a stranger in an unfamiliar space?

Unless you’re extraordinarily extroverted, the silence was deadly and whatever you might have thought of saying seemed trite or cliché or just plain stupid.

Time passed by slowly. It practically crawled. Plainly, this was one clock in desperate need of winding. Because it was unimaginable that anything could creep along with such an absence of speed as this.

The archetypal situation for such a scenario is an elevator. The doors slide open and – Presto! – another human being appears. And it didn’t matter whether you were the one already inside the elevator (where your space was about to be invaded) or if you were the one seeking entry.

“Uncomfortable” doesn’t begin to describe the feeling of being in such situations. And, sometimes, it’s downright weird.

Luckily, as is true for so many things, such problems rarely occur in today’s modern age.

But in those instances when they do, and sophisticated as we are, we’ve found a remedy. And, in the 21st century, virtually all remedies either are or rely on Technology.

The Great Savior. The Problem Solver.

All one needs in such situations is something that fits in the palm of your hand: a phone.

It relieves the burden of making eye contact. Or saying “Hello.” In fact, a phone empowers you to avoid everything and not do anything.

Smart phones are smart insofar as they allow us to connect to the Interweb. Where, once there, we can connect to Social Media. Which affords us the opportunity to ignore the social opportunity before us and socialize with those who can’t stop discussing themselves.

The device once intended as the thread connecting people across great distances, ensuring the perpetuation of a social civilization, is now the thing that drives us apart. An irony no one has missed.

On the other hand: Problem Solved.

Have a comment about this Blog? Post your feedback on the Frans Wildenhain Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/pages/Frans-Wildenhain-Creative-Commercial-American-Ceramics-at-Mid-century/125443280894663

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *