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Society of Physics Students: Fall Picnic

Kevin Granger on Friday, 22 October 2010. Posted in Clubs, Student Life

Twice a year, the Society of Physics Students (SPS) have a picnic at the RIT Observatory. Me and my roommate went this fall, and boy do I have stories to tell.

SPS members crowded around the grill, socializing

It's a gaggle of Galilean geeks! SPS Members socialize while waiting for the burgers to cook. Photo Credit: Kevin Granger

At this picnic, all physics students and professors get together and socialize, eat, and play games. During the fall, the professors typically bring food to the event (the students take care of the food during the spring). Events were kicked off with a game of soccer.

Dr. Richmond and other students playing soccer.Physicists playing soccer at Galilean speeds. Dr. Richmond taught our team a lesson, to say the least. Photo Credit: Tim Shank, SPS President

Many folks were gathered around the grill, waiting eagerly for a burger or hot dog. There was also food inside, and I will eternally regret not finding out who made the delicious chocolate chip cookies. After eating for a bit, the main attraction was announced: the Piñata. Modeled after the infamous-among-physics-majors Mr. Man, the piñata was presented by the Society of Physics Students’ E-Board.

The SPS e-board mimcs Mr Man's facial expression.The Society of Physics Students’ E-Board presents Mr. Man. And Mimics. Photo Credit: Kevin Granger

Participants were spun around 10 times before they ere allowed to swing at the target. Normal people would count “1, 2, 3, .... 10!” But no, we are not normal. We are physics majors. We counted “1, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, ..... 3...” Or, if we were feeling math-y, “2pi, 4pi, 6pi .... 20pi!” The E-board took the first few shots at it. Then everyone else had a turn -- I even took a swing at it, literally!

Kevin, jumping in the air, hitting the pinata.Critical hit! Photo Credit: Nelson Silva

After what seemed like an eternity, a head wound finally began to develop on Mr. Man. We were tired of waiting for our candy, so Mr. Man’s creator, Dr. Hollenbeck, decides to send him back to where he came from. WHAM!

Dr Hollenbeck standing next to Mr ManDr Hollenbeck destroying Mr ManMr. Man meets his maker ... now say that five times fast. Photo Credit: Tim Shank, SPS President.

At this event, we also were able to go inside the observatory itself, and learn about the telescopes. Dr. Richmond showed us how they worked, how they were connected to the computers inside the house, and much more.

Dr Richmond talking to students outside of the observatoryDr Richmond talking to students inside the observatoryDr. Richmond teaches us first-years about how the observatory works. Photo Credit: Kevin Granger / Tim Shank

As the picnic wound down, we played a bit of ultimate frisbee, while Dr. Lindberg played a bit of guitar.

Dr Lindberg plays guitarDr. Lindberg strums and sings. Photo Credit: Tim Shank, SPS President.

I can’t wait until the spring picnic!

Kevin Granger is a first-year physics student who loves picnics, astronomy, soccer, and long walks on the beach. You should follow him on twitter here.

Comments (4)

  • Alex Hensley

    Alex Hensley

    29 October 2010 at 11:55 |
    I'm a high school senior looking to study Physics at RIT next year. It seems like I'm making the right decisions. Looks awesome!
  • Kevin Granger

    Kevin Granger

    05 November 2010 at 11:02 |
    Alex,

    The quality of the physics program here is definitely one of the things that drew me here. It's pretty good if I say so myself!
  • Andrew Tuttle

    Andrew Tuttle

    03 March 2011 at 16:07 |
    I will be coming to RIT next year to study Physics as well. Do you have any tips or insider secrets that would be useful??

    Thanks.

    I hope to see you as well Alex!
  • Kevin Granger

    Kevin Granger

    12 March 2011 at 09:28 |
    Hey Andrew!

    Sorry for the late reply, I'm still settling in after break.

    Tips or insider secrets? I can't really think of any. The biggest challenge you might face is adjusting to college academics rather than high school (motivating yourself to study versus your parents forcing you to).

    Other than that, get to know your professors. It really helps in the long run.

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