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RIT Office of Career Services posts articles related focused on careers or job search strategies.Gretchenhttp://www.blogger.com/profile/13425867744995994091noreply@blogger.comBlogger137125
Updated: 2 hours 32 min ago

The Career Fair is Over. Now What?

Wed, 10/21/2015 - 5:17pm

Tips From The Career Services And Co-op Office On How To Keep The Momentum Going!


  • Follow up! The contact list of employers from the Fair will be available soon at the Co-op Office. If there is an employer you want to connect with but did not get their information you can come to the office and get it (provided the employer agreed to release their information). Send an email to the companies that you are MOST interested in to follow up; always attach a current resume whenever you email a company. Be sure you complete a profile as well as apply to posted positions on the employer career’s link. Keep checking Job Zone as many of these same employers will post positions.
  • If you had an interview – it is essential to write a thank you note! Send the thank you email within 24 hours.  Reiterate your interest in the position and restate your most outstanding qualification for that particular employer.
  • Connect with employers on LinkedIn. Once you have connected, stay in touch with them.  Be careful to stay in touch with permission.
  • Keep detailed records of companies you spoke with, which positions you applied to, who you spoke with.
  • Practice your interviewing skills! You never know when you may hear from an employer you met at the fair.
  • Never ever ignore an employer call, email or text.  Be professional and return the contact within the work day if possible or early the next work day.

Maybe The Career Fair Wasn’t Quite As Successful For You As You Had Hoped It Would Be

What should you be doing now to find a position?  Don’t give up, below are the suggestions.

  • Job Zone www.rit.edu/co-op/careers  Keep checking our website 2x a week for new listings.
  • Other Sites  us.jobs &  indeed.com  Use your major as the keyword.  If you are looking for a co-op add “intern” to your major.  Many companies call the jobs” internships”.  As long as they are paid, full-time and the work is related to your major, it will be counted as a co-op. Your friends aren’t using these outside websites to find places to apply.  Use them and get ahead of the competition.
  • Apply to Everything Do not be picky about location or company.  Many employers assist with housing. Don’t worry that you don’t have every skill on the job listing. For a co-op search, you want to send at least 75 resumes.
  • Network  Be sure you have a LinkedIn Profile. Connect with employers and alumni who may be able to give job leads.  LinkedIn also has a job listing database to search for potential opportunities. Join a club or engineering society to reach out and network with employers.
  • Volunteer You never know who you might meet.


October is National Disability Employment Awareness Month!

Wed, 10/21/2015 - 3:41pm
National Disability Employment Awareness Month (NDEAM), held every October, is a time to celebrate the contributions of employees with disabilities. This year, the 2015 NDEAM theme “Who I Am” portrays nine individuals with disabilities describing their various life roles, including employment.
Many employers hiring RIT students have a strong history of hiring candidates with disabilities, and often seek out candidates with disabilities when making new hires. In addition to hiring qualified candidates with disabilities, here are suggestions on how you and your company can show your support for disability employment.
Find candidates with disabilities through Workforce Recruitment Program. ODEP maintains a database of pre-screen college students and recent graduates with disabilities seeking full-time and co-op opportunities.
Train managers. Training plays a crucial role in building inclusive workspaces. In addition to providing education on disability etiquette and reasonable accommodation policies, specific training is available through NTID’s Center on Employment on working with Deaf/Hard of hearing employees in their “Working Together” workshop. RIT Career Services also offers training on working with individuals on the Autism Spectrum.
Make application accessible. Your online application systems may be the candidates’ first impression of your company’s commitment to inclusion. Make sure it accessible by following DOL's tips
Highlight employees with disabilities. Be sure that your website, promotional pieces, and online employee profiles highlight your employees with disabilities in a positive, non-stigmatizing way.
Reach out to your community.  If your company participates in community service events such as Day of Caring, consider giving your support to a disability advocacy organization.
Connect with Deaf/Hard of hearing candidates at the Center on Employment at NTID.
Post with care. Many potential job candidates will connect with you on social media, so check that your posts are accessible to people with disabilities. Provide close captioning for videos, avoid abbreviations and spell out acronyms in posts, and provide links to pages with captions or transcripts of your video and audio content whenever possible.
For more information about hiring students with disabilities, contact Janine Rowe, Assistant Director, Disability Services, Rochester Institute of Technology Office of Career Services, at jmroce@rit.edu.

Free Form Factory: An Interview with a Startup

Thu, 04/30/2015 - 10:00am




You may have heard about start ups, but what are they, and how does one form? There are a lot of resources on entrepreneurship at RIT through Saunders, the Simone Center or maybe you have learned about it through your coursework and classmates. But sometimes, it's hard to teach such an ambiguous and dynamic topic. We reached out to an RIT Alum, Jordan Darling, who created a company called "Free Form Factory, Inc." to hopefully bring a little insight on what a start-up is and what it takes.

Describe your company and what you do

Free Form Factory Inc. is an advanced manufacturing company, currently focused on high performance personal watercraft. Free Form Factory is dedicated to create freedom on the water. Our first hull, FFF 1.0, is the world's first polymer construction high performance jet ski hull. Free Form Factory has developed proprietary manufacturing techniques and worked with one of the leading polymer manufactures to find a new material to manufacture jet ski hulls, known as Hulklite. Free Form Factory has released its first hull and will be shipping world wide in July 2015. This summer we will be expanding into additional products in the action sports market. Please check out our website and social media pages for more information. www.ridefreeform.com @freeformfactory 














Was starting a business something you have always wanted to do? Why?

​Yes, from a young age I have always had the entrepreneurship bug. ​I worked for various companies while at school, to fulfill my co-op requirements. Although it paid well, it wasn't for me.​ I preferred building my own company and doing what I love, while making​ money.​




What kind of benefits do you think developing a start-up has over working for a pre-existing company?



​By developing your own company, ​you control how the company runs and how it is structured. You hire your employees, you pick the location, you drive the company to success. But on the flip side is, you are the one making all of the decisions and not all of them will be correct. Things will break, products will fail, its not the end of the world, it just matters how you react and how quickly you can make the fix and learn from your mistakes. If nothing is going wrong, or nothing is breaking, you're not working hard enough. So expect it and always plan for failures.



What was the biggest struggle you've had to overcome with developing your company?




​The biggest struggle that I had to overcome was balancing my time between starting/running my company and finishing my final semesters at RIT.​ It came to a point where my some of my school work was sacrificed in order for my business to grow.



What is the most rewarding experience you've had?


​The most rewarding experience so far was when I got to ride our new hull (our first product) for the first time. It was a huge relief and accomplishment at the same time. As a company we put so much time and effort into designing and building our first hull and it took nearly 6 months before it touched the water.​



Is working for a start-up company an option for students? Do you have advice for those students looking to work for a start-up for co-op or full-time after graduation?


​Yes, Free Form Factory is looking for interns and or co-ops for Summer and Fall 2015​ semesters (NOTE: Posted in Job Zone) I would highly recommend working for a start up company for one of the required co-op terms. One, it will allow you to see how working for a small company is over a large corporation. Two, you will most likely have more duties and responsibilities than you would working for a larger company. Three, you will be involved in a company at its earlier stages and depending on your performance and how well you work with others, you will have a better chance of getting a full time offer. All of those aside, I would still recommend co-oping for a larger company because that may be a better fit, but you won't know until you try.


What advice would you give any RIT student who wants to begin a start-up company?



​Go for it, while you're still young. You have nothing to lose.​




​For more information about Free Form Factory please visit our website at ridefreeform.com




How to Work a Career Fair: Student Panel

Thu, 02/26/2015 - 12:42pm



Every Career Fair we try to gather some students who are pros at the Career Fair. They answer your questions, and so here are some highlight quotes from the last one, February 25th, 2015! (Italics are questions asked by the attendees of the event)

"Recruiters have said to me that only 1 of 10 interviewees send a thank you. The "Thank You" moves you to the top of the pile."

"[For a follow up] I send an email that night thanking them for their time. Remind them of what you talked about."

"LinkedIn can be used for an exhaustive list of your skills, projects and past experience. Put a link in your resume."

"Definitely put your LinkedIn address on your resume BUT only if it's good and updated OR have a business card with the address on it."

Should I talk to the recruiter while they seem to be "reading" the resume?
"YES! Give them a few seconds to scan, then talk."

"Talk to your professors [the week before the Career Fair] about your classes next week. Try to make plans now to make up work, etc."

"Volunteer work is good for a resume: 'Eagle Scout', 'hobbies or interests', 'personal projects', 'as a Mechanical Engineer, an interest in rocketry', etc."

What to put on your resume if you don't have past experience?
"Academic projects, clubs, courses. Get involved on campus."

"The recruiter will look at your resume for 10 seconds so make your best stuff easy to find."

"A 1 page resume is a must. Tailor your resume to each company and take off stuff that a company wouldn't care about."

"References probably won't be asked for in an interview. They might be asked for on a paper application. Be sure you have the info."

"It's okay to take a minute and think about [a question from a recruiter], or even ask for clarification."

What questions have stumped you?
"'What kind of field are you interested in?' Many RIT majors are so broad it's hard to say."

What kind of questions can you ask employers?
"The recruiter might be an alumni, you can ask them about their RIT experience."
"Research the company and their projects, and ask about them. Ask why they love working there."
"Ask the recruiter what they're doing in their job, projects they can talk about, etc."

"If you are on a Visa, research companies to see if they will hire you."

"Get there early and run to your "A" company to beat the line. But be prepared to wait lines."

"Be ready to show how you can fit into their company and what skills you have that they can use."

What do you wish you knew?
"Recruiters are often the same year after year so visit companies again and again. Build relationships."
"Don't be intimidated. Go talk to the company even if your friends say they aren't interested."

"Not having a good conversation with a company happens. Go on to the next company with a positive attitude."

"Offers don't come every time. Don't get discouraged. This is a networking opportunity. You get better every fair."

"Think about what it is about you that sets you apart from all the others."

"Get the recruiters business card IF it was a good conversation. Follow up after the fair!"

What do you bring?
Folder packed with resumes or portfolio to carry them in. Get the resume out BEFORE you get to the employer."

What do you wear?
"No distracting jewelry, no overwhelming perfume or cologne."
"Think about the company culture, ladies a button down shirt and nice dress pants, not heels for the club."

60 Second Commercial?
"Just introduce yourself in 2-3 sentences. It's not really 60 seconds!"
"Tell the companies why you are talking to them, you major, what you are involved with on campus."

"Go to company events that are held before the fair!"

"Use the map [or Career Fair Plus App] to prepare your strategy" *Note this year you must print out the map yourself."

"Research the companies beforehand, have a plan of attack, tailor your resume to each company."


Thank you to the student panel volunteers and everyone you came to the event! Remember, check out our Twitter account for live coverage of events, or more specifically #RITCF for anything Career Fair related!

Technical Portfolios

Tue, 02/17/2015 - 1:22pm
What is a Portfolio?A portfolio is a collection of projects that highlights your abilities, achievements, and intellect. It allows you to share samples of your work with potential employers using a website or document (.pdf or powerpoint). 
  • The portfolio is designed to do one thing—to support you as you market yourself.
  • A well-prepared portfolio provides "evidence" to the reviewer of your accomplishments, skills, and abilities

How do portfolios differ from resumes?Portfolios can expand on your resume:
  • They allow you to provide concrete examples of your work.
  • They can directly demonstrate your intellect, technical skills and visual competence.
  • They can also improve your visibility.

Do I need a Portfolio?A portfolio is useful if you want to demonstrate your technical and design skills beyond the description on your resume.  A portfolio can also set you apart from other candidates since not many applicants use one.  Interviewers and hiring managers remember pictures over text so a portfolio can help you be remembered.  Whether you have a hard copy or an on-line portfolio, you can use it during the Career Fair.  Bring the hard copy or bring a tablet and show the on-line version.


Guidelines for Content:

Pics and documents that demonstrate abilities and experiences which are directly related to hiring needs or job field of prospective employer, and gives a sense of your competencies.  In your descriptions, walk your reader through the process from design to completion.
  • Engineering design projects
  • Future or planned projects – show the design, budget, parts list, calculations
  • Writing samples and a modified resume (see information on copyright and privacy)
  • Labs
  • Club projects

Portfolio Website & Examples:www.coroflot.comStudents who have used this site say that it’s as easy as Facebook and only took 60-90 minutes to put together their portfolio.  The hardest part is collecting the pictures of your projects.  You can look on the site and see many examples of engineering portfolios – Search for People, then under “Specialties” on the left, click on Engineering.  If you want to see a couple of portfolios by RIT students, look at James Hertzel or Timothy Halsch.

Linkedin as a Portfolio:





The idea is to give users the opportunity to display their work rather than just talk about it. Go to your LinkedIn profile, and next to any module or position on your personal profile you'll see a small square image with a plus sign on it. Click this to either upload a file or add a link to your work.   (See more here)See this recent RIT grad’s Linkedin page for ideas: Jose Cuevas

Linkedin vs. CoroflotShould you use Coroflot or Linkedin to display your work (or both)?  Coroflot is picture heavy and text light so if you have a lot of work to display and don’t want to spent time writing and editing content then Coroflot is for you.  Linkedin is text heavy so if you don’t have a lot of pictures to display then you may find that Linkedin works for you.  If you use Linkedin, be sure to spend time writing a strong Professional Heading (the title under your name) and Summary.

Portfolio Link on Resume

You should put a link to your portfolio and/or your Linkedin page on your resume.  It can be placed in your header with your address, email and phone.  Put it in as an active hyperlink so that anyone viewing your resume digitally can click and go.  Be sure that you spell out the whole address though so that anyone who has a paper copy of your resume can type in the portfolio address and see it.

Spring Career Fair, 2015

Tue, 02/03/2015 - 10:07am
Updates will be made to this post as things change:
image009.jpg@01CFC129.33B31CF0
Spring Career Fair is coming!
Wednesday, March 4, 201510:00 – 4:00  *Note new extended timeGordon Field HouseInterview Day Thursday March 5th  (for students with interviews scheduled from the Career Fair)
210+ companies already registered!  Open to all students, all majorsCheck out companies, jobs, and workshops on Job Zone –www.rit.edu/careerservices
*New this year – Career Fair Pre-Registration Don’t stand in line – register online!VIP pre-registration begins Feb 9 – look for an email with details later this week
Follow the Career Fair on Twitter @RITCareers, and #RITCF
*Make the most of your Career Fair experience with Career Fair Plus!  Download this app to your mobile device and get up-to-the-minute info on companies, special announcements, events, and a map of the fair.

Career Fair Quick Tips:How do I find companies coming for my major?·         Login to Job Zone, click Events, in Career Fair section, click Spring 2015 Career Fair. Click Advanced Search, select Spring 2015 Career Fair in the Day section, then select your major from the pull-down menu. ·         You can also select any applicable citizenship requirement, and select the applicable position type.·         Click submit.·         The results are companies attending the fair for your major.  You can use this list to research and determine which companies you will approach at the fair.How do I prepare for the fair?·         Research Companies of Interest to You - Check out the company website, company profiles in directories, and search for news articles about the company. Finding out general information will allow you to ask intelligent questions of the recruiter, and learn where you might fit in at the company.·         Update Your Resume - It is essential to have a resume that reflects your current skills and experiences, as most companies will be forwarding copies of resumes to many departments within their organization. Make sure that others have proofread your resume for accuracy; your career services coordinator in the Office of Career Services & Co-op is available to check it over.·         Be Prepared to Ask Questions - Try to have one or two questions in mind for each employer, based on your research of and interest in the company. Do not ask the recruiters personal questions.·         Know Yourself - Know why you want to work for the company, and be able to express your skills, accomplishments, and goals in a clear, concise manner. Try to identify specific experiences where you have demonstrated your strengths and skills.·         Learn to Sell Yourself Quickly - You’ll only have a few minutes to introduce yourself, show you know what the organization is about, and spark the recruiter’s interest in you for a future, more formal interview. This is not easy, and takes preparation and practice – use a mirror, web cam, friend, or practice with your career services coordinator in the Office of  Career Services & Co-op.
Workshops to Help You Prepare for Career Fair:Job Search for International StudentsCo-Presented with International Student Services OfficeWed, Feb. 11, 4-5:00pm | Student Alumni Union – 1829 RoomIn today’s world, looking for a job can be challenging.  Learn various methods to find job openings and network successfully. 
Resume Writing: Employers SpeakThurs, Feb. 12, 5-6:00pm | Bausch & Lomb Center - Room A190Learn resume and cover letter writing techniques.
Acing the InterviewMon, Feb. 16, 5-6:00pm | Bausch & Lomb Center - Room A190
Building a Better Technical Resume 
Thurs, Feb. 19, 5-6:00pm | Student Alumni Union – 1829 RoomLearn the specifics of preparing your technical resume.
Career Fair Prep U & Resume Review                     Thurs – Fri, Feb. 26 – 27, 11am-1:00pm | Student Alumni Union – Lobby    Stop by the SAU and we will answer your questions about the Career Fair and review your resume.
How to Work a Career FairWed, Feb. 25, 4:30-5:30pm | Bausch & Lomb Center - Room A190Let’s get you ready to set yourself apart!
Mock Interview Day  Fri, Feb. 27, 9am – 4:00pmBausch & Lomb Center Office of Career ServicesAdvanced sign up required through Job Zone (resume required).
Keep It Classy: Career Clothing Open House - Sponsored by TRiO SSSMon, March 2, 2-4:00pm | Campus Center – Bamboo Room 2650     Is your career fair ensemble lacking? Come to find clothing and accessories to help you complete your outfit: first-come, first-serve and free of charge. 
Career Fair Tips- Recruiter Panel    Mon, March 2, 4 –5:00pm | Student Alumni Union – 1829 Room
Behavioral Interviewing – The STAR ApproachMon, March 2, 5:30 – 6:30pm | Student Alumni Union – 1829 RoomToyota and GE use Behavioral Interviewing, as do many other companies.  These are not easy interview questions to answer unless you are prepared
To request interpreting services go to https://myaccess.rit.edu/2/
For more tips and resources, go here
Download the Career Fair Plus App read this post about it

Making the Most of Your Job Search During Intersession

Mon, 12/15/2014 - 11:42am
With intersession right around the corner, you may be wondering if it is too early to start your job search for summer co-ops or full-time jobs after graduation. It is never too early to get started on your job search – and here are six ideas to help get you started. 

1. Update your resume and LinkedIn profile: They should reflect your most recent courses, GPA, labs, projects, co-op experiences, club participation and leadership, and other experiences that you accumulated during the Fall semester. View our resume guides for help constructing your resume and resume samples. Also, update your Job Zone profile to be sure all of your information is accurate and up to date. Also view our Guide to using LinkedIn and Checklist for a great student profile
2. Practice telling your story: Now is a great time to prepare for tough interview questions like “Tell me about yourself,” “What are your weaknesses,” and “Tell me about a time when…” Review possible interview questions here and review strategies for successful interviewing. Try getting feedback on your answers from friends and family. Many students find that building a career portfolio– a collection of work samples, class projects, transcripts, letters of recommendations, and more - will provide useful visual cues during an interview.
3. Ask for at least 3 referrals from friends and family: Holiday gatherings are a great time to talk with family and friends about your current co-op or full-time job search. You never know how they might be able to help. Ask your friends and family members if they have any connections to pursue informational interviews or networking opportunities. You can also outreach to our Career Coaches section of Job Zone to search for a mentor. 
4. Review Job Zone and other co-op/job search resources and develop a targeted list of 20 opportunities or employers• Co-op and full-time job opportunities are posted daily on Job Zone. Set up a search agent to send you alerts when new jobs are posted. • Perhaps there is a company near your home that would be a perfect site for a co-op or full-time job. View their career webpages to find out more information about possible opportunities. You can also contact your Career Services Coordinator for help making your initial outreach.      • Explore RIT’s Career Resources for more opportunities, such as Vault Career GuidesGlassdoor, and job search resources by college/major
5. Volunteer: There are many volunteering opportunities over the holiday season, and it is a great opportunity to try something new and explore a cause that is close to your heart. Also, employers love a candidate who is involved in the community. Don’t forget to add your experience to your resume and LinkedIn profile! 
6. Learn something new: With your free time, you may be able to spend a day or two picking up a new skill. Check out online tutorials in business, software, web development and more on Lynda.comCoursera, or EdX. Check out the RIT Intersession class schedule to catch up or get ahead on required courses.
The Office of Career Services and Cooperative Education will be open throughout finals week, closing from Dec. 25- Jan. 2. We will re-open for counseling and advising appointments on Jan. 5. 
For an appointment, email your Career Services Coordinatoror call us at 585-475-2301. 
Written by Janine Rowe, MSEd., NCCCareer Counselor RIT Office of Career Services

Career Fair from a Senior's Perspective

Wed, 11/12/2014 - 10:59am
Peter RyanOctober 1st, 2014 saw hundreds of students and scores of companies in the Gordon Field House for the annual Fall Career Fair. I've previously written about my preparation process for the Career Fair but I've never shared my experiences or what I do after the fair ends.

This fall I went to the fair with the goal of networking and meeting professionals in my industry. I utilized Office of Career Services and Cooperative Education resources to find company interest sessions and to find RIT alumni from the companies represented. Attending the interest sessions is always useful to me as I can take more time to have conversations and talk with the company's representatives. After the interest sessions I take time to update my career spreadsheet with company and job specific information. The spreadsheet allows me to keep my information organized and track my relationships with various companies and organizations. I'll then usually connect with the individuals I met at the fair on LinkedIn or send an email to thank them for their time and advice.

Again this year I volunteered as a "Wireless Wizard" assisting companies get online. This gave me the opportunity to enter the fair more than an hour prior to the start which meant that I could scope out where I wanted to go in-person and even meet with some of the company reps that I wanted to speak with. Once the fair started I followed my list and map to visit the booths I had previously designated as being interested in. As expected there were long lines for some of the more prominent and well-known companies so I had visited as many of the other booths on my list with smaller lines as I could. Due to class and other commitments I wasn't able to stay as long as I wanted to but when I left I was satisfied that I had a way of connecting with the companies that I wanted to.

After the fair ended I was treated to a dinner by my co-op employer, Symantec. It was great to see and catch up with my team and enjoy a nice meal. I was happy to hear that the division was doing well and that the work that I contributed to the projects I was tasked with were adding value to the company. The fair culminated with me getting asked to visit Boston, MA for an interview for a summer co-op. I am excited to see where that discussion takes me and I am thankful for the Career Fair for providing the opportunity.

-Peter

Look out for Peter and more seniors in an upcoming campaign which will feature multiple seniors and their experience trying to plan for their post-graduation plans and careers.


5 Tips for Making the Most of Your Co-op

Tue, 10/21/2014 - 3:29pm

Before You Leave

Your co-op may be winding down or you may be gearing up for a second term. In either case you have the opportunity to make a positive lasting impression on your employer that can be impactful for your career. Here are five tips on how to make the most of your experience:

1. Make connections and stay connected through LinkedIn

Be very, very vigilant about connecting on LinkedIn after every new face-to-face interaction. A short thank you or kind note to co-workers and supervisors will help to build a robust social network on LinkedIn. Every time you get a business card—assuming you still get paper business cards—enter the person’s information into your contacts and reach out to that person on LinkedIn. Also, asking for recommendations on LinkedIn is a great way to get the most out of your connections on the job.

2. Complete all of your projects

Make sure anything you have outstanding is completed and that you have returned all materials and proprietary information to your employer. Tie up loose ends neatly and make sure projects are submitted in a polished, professional manner.

3. Ask for feedback

Ask for a brief face to face meeting with your supervisor to go over your co-op evaluation and receive feedback on how you performed on the job. Asking for feedback will help you to grow professionally and shows you have an interest in the work you did.

4. Don’t forget your co-op work report!

Make sure you complete your co-op work report. Don’t get an ‘F’ on your transcript because you put off completing the report. Get it done before you leave the co-op. Check with your career services coordinator or look on your department website to see if you need to complete a report and how to submit it, and to whom.

5. Ask about the evaluation

Follow up with your supervisor to make sure they have received, completed and submitted their evaluation. The evaluation is part of your grade so it is critical that it be done. Don’t leave without following up on this as it is sometimes difficult to track people down once you have left. If they have not received it or it may have gone to the wrong person just call us! We can resend it.

6. Update your resume

While it’s fresh in your mind update your resume. Use your job description to highlight the various things you did. Add any accomplishments or new skills you’ve acquired.            

7.  Say ‘Thank You’

Saying thanks goes a long way. End on a positive note by thanking your supervisor as well as your co-workers for taking time to train, mentor and answer your questions.

Career Fair Plus

Mon, 09/15/2014 - 10:02am


Are you tired of fumbling with print outs, notes and a map at the Career Fair? Frustrated by clicking tons of links to try and find information about the Fair? Well do we have the thing for you! And no, it’s not some online or infomercial scam. The Career Fair Plus App. So what is it, and why should you download it? Let’s dive right in.

First of all, it’s free!

Go to www.careerfairplus.com or you can find it on the App Store or Google play, scroll until you find the one for RIT. It’s that simple!

Convenience of everything in one

This allows you to have all of your Career Fair needs in one place. We'll give you a little tour of each section 
Picture of Home Screen

Companies

Here you will find a list of all the companies attending the Career Fair right a the palm of your hand. Take a look at Apple's page for example. You can see their overview, where they'll be located, majors they're hiring, kinds of degrees and positions they're hiring for and then extra information at the bottom. You can also type your own personal note at the top. Maybe they're a company you want to check out, so write that, or maybe you have a more tailored 60 Second Commercial for them so you want to make note of specific information you want to tell them.







The best part about this section is the filter system. You don't have to sift through all these companies looking for your major. Just like in Job Zone, you can set filters. The picture to the left is how you would filter by major -- at the top do you see those other letters? D stands for degree, I for Industry, P for positions and WA for work authorization. All the info on the company page can be used as a specific filter. It will only display companies that are looking for the specific things you checked off on the filter. Want to start again? Hit "clear filter" and being a new search. Or back on the company page, hit "All" instead of filter to just see all the companies. 










Fair Map

Currently there is no map because we haven't released that yet, but this is where you would find it. Unlike the paper copy, there is way more interactivity. You can mark favorites and click on booths to see what company is there. This is WAY easier than checking it off on the paper copy. 



Events

Here will be posting all of our office's events such as Info Sessions, Networking Events and Workshops leading up to the fair. Many of them will help you prep for the Fair. Any event that is usually on our Job Zone calendar will be here with all of the info you need at your convenience. The best part? You can add events to your phone's calendar (as long as you allow the app to access your calendar, which is encouraged). How easy is that?!




Announcements

The Career Fair is hectic and you might miss some important updates (companies adding/dropping majors, moving booths, not coming, etc.). We always make it a priority to get that information to you as fast as possible through our Twitter account (@RITCareers, #RITCF), and posted on an announcement board on the field house floor, but you may miss it. Here we will try and post the same information. This is similar to how you can expect the announcements to look.




Career Fair 101

Do you get lost in our endless catalog of Career Fair Tips? We want to make it even easier for you to find when you're getting ready for the Fair. This is where they will be. Similar to our web page articles, these will be nice resources to go through before the Career Fair.



And that's the Career Fair Plus app! Download it, get familiar with it and dominate the Career Fair!

Career Fair: A Literal First-Person Perspective

Fri, 09/12/2014 - 10:01am
Do you want to go to the Career Fair but have never gone? Are you afraid of what it might be like? Never fear! Now you don't have to wake up during the Fair and call your friends pretending that you're sick so you don't have to go. Using some amazing new technologies (also known as a GoPro camera) we have captured the career fair from a student's perspective. Do you think the companies noticed? Probably, considering it was strapped onto the head of Tom Weekes, a New Media Marketing major here at Saunders College of Business. His embarrassment is your gain. Enjoy!




Value of Joining a Professional Association

Wed, 06/04/2014 - 2:06pm
Professionals associations can offer a lot of value to their members -- as a vehicle to learn more about and/or make contributions to your chosen field, to network with other members or as a source out job opportunities posted by members for members. So think carefully about the association you join because some are more active than others, and the benefits do vary. Read on to learn more about associations and how they may be a helpful in starting or developing your career.

What Exactly is a Professional Association?

A Professional Association is a structured group of like-minded individuals who gather to pursue their common interests, exchange information, and network with each other, for personal and professional benefits.

There are professional associations for every career field, and some general associations that are focused on other criteria and accept members from all fields, such as the Rochester Women’s Network and Rochester Young Professionals.

Professional associations are an excellent resource for career exploration when you are starting out, and for networking as you grow in your new profession. They are also one of the most powerful networking and job search tools available. Student memberships in professional associations are often free, or at significantly reduced rates compared to professional memberships.

Professional associations serve a wide variety of purposes, including establishing and monitoring industry standards and professional codes of practice, promoting the profession in the community, producing professional and industry publications, and maintaining a professional library for members. One of the main goals of many professional associations is to promote the career advancement of their members. Many offer career development information, networking opportunities between members, conferences, and even exclusive job and internship listings.

 

Why Join a Professional Network?

Professional Associations are a powerful resource for job seekers. Through their various activities and services (meetings, conferences, publications, websites, etc.) professional associations provide information about career fields, job opportunities, and employers in the professions they serve. They can be particularly helpful if you need to create a network to help you conduct a long-distance job search.

As a resume builder, associations indicate your dedication to and strong interest in your field to potential employers, and can also ensure your resume will matched in a keyword search by a recruiter searching through an applicant database on a Web search engine.

By participating in the activities of professional associations, students/alumni can gain practical experience and meet professionals already working in the field. You can also:
  • increase your knowledge of the profession and industry you are interested in, which will help you to decide whether you wish to pursue a career in this field
  • increase your knowledge of companies and organizations and the career opportunities they offer
  •  improve your business etiquette and communication skills
  • work for the association on projects and develop new skills
  • receive assistance with job-seeking through workshops, seminars, site visits, employer functions, vacancy listings etc.
  • learn about and apply for co-op placements and other job opportunities
  • develop skills through participation in professional development activities
  • socialize with fellow students who share similar interests and career goals
  • network with prospective colleagues and employers
  • remain up-to-date with developments in the field
  • learn about day-to-day issues you will face in the workplace

 

How do I use Professional Associations in my Job Search?

  • Association websites - check out the association website, if there is one. It can be a treasure trove of useful material: job listings, conferences, meeting and event calendars, member directories, news, emailed newsletters, etc.
  • Meetings/events - if it is a national organization with a local chapter, or a local organization, go to a couple of meetings (don't stop at just one meeting!) to see who is there and what they do.
  • Conferences/trade shows - check out the exhibitors to see who they are, what they do, what their new products and services might be, and, with luck, employment opportunities they may have.
  • Member directories - think of them as catalogs of potential employers and/or potential coworkers. You can use these directories to network and conduct informational interviews with potential employment contacts.
  • Committees - the best way to meet colleagues at other companies (where you may soon be working) is to join one of the association's committees. At a minimum, it will give you people with whom you can talk when you go to the next meeting. At best, it will give you visibility with everyone in the organization and the opportunity to demonstrate your expertise as well as establishing a good reputation.

 

How do I find a Professional Association?

There are professional associations available for every career field, and the Internet is a great starting place to find an association that matches your interests. You can do a general search for your field + professional associations, or use the general lists of professional associations below to find specific associations by category.   
Check with your program coordinator in the Co-op and Career Services Office for the associations they recommend for your field of interest. We have also organized our "staff picks" on our Lists of Recommended Sites by program on our site-- so look them over!

Co-op Student Newsletter - Spring 2014 Issue

Thu, 05/29/2014 - 11:53am


Stay connected to RIT, while gaining experience
Spring 2014 Issue Topics:Co-op Factoids | Greetings From...Co-op Student Postcard | Etiquette For On The Job Success | Make The Most Of Your Co-op: How To Be Social At Work | Are You Number One?| A Little Humor

Fall Co-op Factoids
Number of students on co-op: 1264
Number of students on co-op internationally: 26
Number of companies employing co-op students: 736
Top 5 companies hiring the most students this quarter: GE Aviation, Wegmans, BorgWarner Morse, Paychex, Welch Allyn, Bendix, Thomson Reuters, Harris Corp., Vicor, RIT
Co-op city trivia:   Founded in 1757, Lynchburg Virginia is located in the foothills of the Blue Ridge Mountains along the banks of the James River. Lynchburg is known as the City of Seven Hills and was the only major city in Virginia that did not fall to the Union Army before the end of the American Civil War.

Greetings From Walt Disney World – Co-op Student PostcardIt may not be obvious, but it makes a lot of sense that Walt Disney World hires engineers. We asked Matt Purcell to share his co-op experiences along with some tips and stories related to how to make the best of your co-op!
Greetings From Disney Postcard front
Disney Postcard -- Matt Purcell Co-op Experience
Send us your own co-op greetings --share your experience! Email Gretchen at geboce@rit.eduif you are interested in being featured – include an engaging photo of you at work. Thanks!

Etiquette For On The Job Success
All that hard work and you’ve finally landed that great co-op job!  Now it’s time to focus on making your co-op turn into another success story for you by being aware of proper office etiquette. Follow some of the simple tips below to help you enhance your experience and be a good citizen at your company!
Dress to impress – Most companies will give you some sort of orientation and talk about the proper dress code, so if they tell you the dress code is business or business casual – that’s what you wear. If you’re not sure, just look around you – does what you have on fit in with the attire of your supervisor or senior members? Start out on the formal side until you are on the job for a week or two and can observe what’s accepted. Things to avoid – bare feet, flip flops, clothing that’s too revealing, jeans, work-out clothes, shorts and tank tops. Dress for the job you want, not the one you’ve got!Punctuality – Find out your assigned work hours and then come in on time and don’t leave before the agreed upon time.  If you are sick or unavoidably late, be sure to call in to let someone know. Never mind what your boss or “everyone else is doing” – stick to your hours – it will always come up at review time!Company culture – Getting the lay of the land is vital. Is the work environment casual or a little more formal? Do employees address managers by their first names or Mr. and Ms.? Know the organizational and reporting structure. What are the rules about taking breaks, using the internet, Facebook and other social media during work or free time? Is listening to music with your ear buds in allowed while working? Remember, this is a place of business, not the dorm room, so if you’re not sure what is acceptable, ask your supervisor!Ditch the dorm life – Falling asleep at the desk is one of the most common problems reported by employers. Now that you’re in a professional setting, eating right and getting enough sleep is a must. A healthy lifestyle will keep you alert and make you more productive on the job. So if you’re used to socializing or playing video games until 3:00 am, now’s the time to adjust your schedule to avoid those heavy eyelids during the day.What else can I do? – If you’re not busy enough or just want to get more experience, ask what you can do next – time is money so productivity is important.  Show them that you are a hard worker and take assignments seriously. Ask questions and absorb as much information and knowledge as you can to get the most out of your co-op. Try to get yourself included in meetings and projects – show initiative and go beyond the basic co-op tasks when you can. Enthusiasm goes a long way!Be respectful – We all have our opinions and in increasingly diverse workplaces, we don’t always agree. Listen carefully, act maturely and honor others ideas in a non-judgmental way. It may appear to be a dumb way to do things to you, but you may not be aware of the big picture and others may have been there awhile and have a lot more experience. Offering your ideas is fine, just always be respectful of the fact that many people bring many different perspectives.  It’s confidential! –Intellectual property, trade secrets, product designs, formulas and algorithms, ideas for future developments, company reports, etc. are all proprietary information. The same is true for all customer/vendor lists, employee directories and email/address lists, work notebooks. Ask yourself if the information would be valuable to a competitor or anyone on the outside? Treat everything that you see and hear as though it is confidential - when in doubt, don’t share!Check your ego – We all have to do things that sometimes seem below our skill level. Avoid the “it’s not my job” attitude and accept tasks willingly. The quicker you get the little stuff over with, the more time you have to focus on the more meaningful work. Do the best job you can no matter what is asked!It’s company property – Everything from scotch tape, the copy machine to laptops belongs to the company and is not there for your personal use. Stick to the rules for use of company cars and travel expenses and always ask permission before using company equipment.Keep records and get feedback – document your work, keep good records and track your work and projects. This will come in very handy when it is time for your review, to prepare your departmental work report and to update your resume. Time goes by quickly and it is easy to forget details! Consult your supervisor regularly and get feedback about your work.  Are you meeting expectations? Clarify any questions you have about projects and procedures. Make him/her aware of any conflicts or problems.Prepare to stay connected – network with co-workers for future co-op or full time work. Get to know customers and others in internal departments. Start building your network now! Line up your references at the end of your co-op and stay in touch after you leave.The grandma check – Always conduct yourself in a professional manner as though someone is watching you in and around the office and also during “off hours” at informal parties and gatherings where you might feel it is ok to let your guard down (especially situations when alcohol may be available).  Avoid gossip and involvement in “office politics”. Make efficient use of your time and personal calls and emails should not be made on company time. Emails and conversations (even though in perhaps an informal or social situation) should always contain clean language and you should never say anything that can’t be shared with everyone. If you wouldn’t do it or say it around grandma, don’t do it at work either!

Make the Most of Your Co-op Tip: How To Be Social At Work
Work sometimes can be stressful, and so can managing your social life. You may feel like being at work is like being in a middle school cafeteria, especially right when you start. Who do you talk to? Who do you fit in with? Who will I sit with at lunch? There are some good ways to blend right into these questions and let them answer themselves:
1.       Work EventsOne of the best ways to get assimilated into company culture is by going to work events. This can range from office parties to community events that the organization goes to or hosts. A lot of offices have bulletin boards, sign ups and email listings so make sure you find where these are and get on those lists. It doesn’t have to be something you’re really passionate about; it can be something basic like a community service event, or a sporting game.

Many companies hire co-ops in groups, especially in the summer. Typically these companies will organize events specifically for the co-ops such as picnics, baseball games or things that might be unique to that city. Make sure you go to these! It’s a perfect opportunity to meet people of your age group.If your office doesn’t really have a lot of this, be courageous and organize and event yourself that revolves around something you’re interested in. Maybe try something as simple as going to see a movie, play or concert.
2.       Make your cubicle/office welcomingA problem a lot of people have is that they become introverted at work. Sometimes this is a good thing when you’re really busy and need to pound out work, but during more relaxed times try something as simple as just having your door open. Even if that just means them walking by and saying “hello!” A lot of conversations have just in a doorway of an office.
Some of you might have cubicles or smaller work areas. Since this is always open, try decorating it to make your area inviting. You can read more about this in our other blog post, “Decorating Your Cube” http://ritcareers.blogspot.com/2013/10/decorating-your-cube.html. Long story short, decorate your area with things that represent you (a movie/TV show poster, pictures, etc.). It gives other people something to talk about with you and shows your personality.


3.       Have your lunch with other peopleDon’t be a hermit and eat your lunch hiding away in your office or go off site to eat. Bring your lunch and eat in an employee break room, or invite other people to go out for lunch or don’t be afraid to join in on a group of people going out to lunch. Just being around other people in the workplace allows for conversation and relationship building.
4.       Don’t be too socialSo yeah, we just told you how to be modestly social at work, but there IS a way to go too far. Even though you are trying to be friends with these individuals, you are still on a professional level with them, especially at work. It’s great to go to work events, but keep some things in mind:-Some of these work parties have alcohol, so control yourself. This isn’t a college frat party. If you are under 21, DON’T DRINK!
-Some people might not be comfortable with certain information, so don’t spill out personal details of your life on just anyone. This puts other employees and the employers in an awkward position and some people have gotten fired for this.
-Be careful with work relationships. You may not know the other person too well and the last thing you want is to be accused of sexual harassment or a complaint to your supervisor. It’s not a situation to be taken lightly. A good rule is to avoid office romances altogether.
Bottom line is, don’t be afraid. You got hired because you fit into the office atmosphere, and chances are the people in the office want to get to know you. The earlier you start this process, the easier it will be, so start making some work friends!

Are You Number One?
Are you the first co-op student your company has ever had? If you’ve had a good co-op experience, but are now leaving, this is your chance to help your company and other RIT students too!
Before you go, talk with your supervisor about the possibility of hiring another RIT student, to continue the work you started, or work on a new project. It’s easy to post a co-op position on our employer web site – www.rit.edu/recruit, and if they have any questions, you can refer them to your program coordinator, or our main office – 585.475.2301. Your supervisor may even want you to be involved in recruiting your successor!
Thank you for helping us maintain a good relationship with your company, and develop co-op opportunities for other RIT students.

A Little HumorApplying for a job at IKEA cartoon 




Etiquette For On The Job Success

Mon, 04/21/2014 - 4:27pm

All that hard work and you’ve finally landed that great co-op job! Now it’s time to focus on making your co-op turn into another success story for you by being aware of proper office etiquette. Follow some of the simple tips below to help you enhance your experience and be a good citizen at your company!

Dress to impress – Most companies will give you some sort of orientation and talk about the proper dress code, so if they tell you business or business casual – that’s what you wear. If you’re not sure, just look around you – does what you have on fit in with the attire of your supervisor or senior members? Start out on the formal side until you are on the job for a week or two and can observe what’s accepted. Things to avoid – bare feet, flip flops, see-through and clothing that’s too revealing, jeans, work-out clothes, shorts and tank tops. Dress for the job you want, not the one you’ve got! Punctuality – Find out your assigned work hours and then come in on time and don’t leave before the agreed upon time.  If you are sick or unavoidably late, be sure to call in to let someone know. Never mind what your boss or “everyone else is doing” – stick to your hours – it will always come up at review time! Company culture – Getting the lay of the land is vital. Is the work environment casual or a little more formal? Do employees address managers by their first names or Mr. and Ms.? Know the organizational and reporting structure. What are the rules about taking breaks, using the internet, Facebook and other social media during work or free time? Is listening to music with earbuds on allowed while working? Remember, this is a place of business, not the dorm room, so if you’re not sure what is acceptable, ask your supervisor! Ditch the dorm life – Falling asleep at the desk is one of the most common problems reported by employers. Now that you’re in a professional setting, eating right and getting enough sleep is a must. A healthy lifestyle will keep you alert and make you more productive on the job. So if you’re used to socializing or playing video games until 3:00 am, now’s the time to adjust your schedule to avoid those heavy eyelids during the day. What else can I do? – If you’re not busy enough or just want to get more experience, ask what you can do next – time is money so productivity is important.  Show them that you are a hard worker and take assignments seriously. Ask questions and absorb as much information and knowledge as you can to get the most out of your co-op. Try to get yourself included in meetings and projects – show initiative and go beyond the basic co-op tasks when you can. Enthusiasm goes a long way! Be respectful – We all have our opinions and in increasingly diverse workplaces, we don’t always agree. Listen carefully, act maturely and honor others ideas in a non- judgmental way. It may appear to be a dumb way to do things to you, but you may not be aware of the big picture and others may have been there awhile and have a lot more experience. Offering your ideas is fine, just always be respectful of the fact that many people bring many different perspectives.  It’s confidential! –Intellectual property, trade secrets, product designs, formulas and algorithms, ideas for future developments, company reports, etc. are all proprietary information. The same is true for all customer/vendor lists, employee directories and email/address lists, work notebooks. Ask yourself if the information would be valuable to a competitor or anyone on the outside? Treat everything that you see and hear as though it is confidential - when in doubt, don’t share! Check your ego – We all have to do things that sometimes seem below our skill level. Avoid the “it’s not my job” attitude and accept tasks willingly. The quicker you get the little stuff over with, the more time you have to focus on the more meaningful work. Do the best job you can no matter what is asked! It’s company property – Everything from scotch tape, the copy machine to laptops belongs to the company and is not there for your personal use. Stick to the rules for use of company cars and travel expenses and always ask permission before using company equipment. Keep records and get feedback – document your work, keep good records and track your work and projects. This will come in very handy when it is time for your review, to prepare your departmental work report and to update your resume. Time goes by quickly and it is easy to forget details! Consult your supervisor regularly and get feedback about your work.  Are you meeting expectations? Clarify any questions you have about projects and procedures. Make him/her aware of any conflicts or problems. Prepare to stay connected – network with co-workers for future co-op or full time work. Get to know customers and others in internal departments. Start building your network now! Line up your references at the end of your co-op and stay in touch after you leave. The grandma check – Always conduct yourself in a professional manner as though someone is watching you in and around the office and also during “off hours” at informal parties and gatherings where you might feel it is ok to let your guard down (especially situations when alcohol may be available).  Avoid gossip and involvement in “office politics”. Make efficient use of your time and personal calls and emails should not be made on company time. Emails and conversations (even though in perhaps an informal or social situation) should always contain clean language and you should never say anything that can’t be shared with everyone. If you wouldn’t do it or say it around grandma, don’t do it at work either!

Tips For Graduating Students and Recent Grads Still Looking For A Job

Thu, 04/17/2014 - 3:29pm
If you’re still looking for a job, it’s important to take advantage of all
available resources through the RIT Office of Co-op and Career Services and develop a comprehensive job search strategy. Here are some tips and resources you may find helpful. You have FREE lifetime access to our office’s services! (Even after you graduate). Many resources and connections to social media can be accessed through our site.
1. RIT Job Zone is our job listing database. If you have not been using it - take advantage of it now. Before you leave campus, set up an alumni account so that you can continue to access Job Zone after graduation. Make sure your search criteria is not too narrow. Using multiple sources is smart – but don’t ignore some of the most obvious, like Job Zone! Have you uploaded your most recent resume? Set up a search agent that will email you with new postings, use it as a saved search. Instructions are on the main Job Zone page.2. Follow up with all companies where your application is pending. If a company has your resume, and you have not heard from them, give them a follow up call or e-mail. If you have interviewed with a company, touch base with them to check your status and offer to answer any questions they may have.3. Meet with your Program Coordinator (in person or phone appointment) for tips to strengthen your job search strategy. Your Program Coordinator is also a great source of job search resources and industry information specific to your career field. Get a job search diagnosis and move ahead with fresh focus. Double check your resume and cover letter - have us review them, perhaps there is room for improvement, especially as you transition from student to new grad.4. Use resources to identify prospective employers. Find job boards and professional organizations specific to your field on our web site -- general sites like Vault, CareerSearch, Glassdoor and Internships.com that we subscribe to. There are also numerous major-specific lists to choose from. Here is a link to those Web Resources you may find helpful. Each of our program coordinators has gather helpful sites for their majors, you can find a list of them on the right side of this page or Web Resources page.5. Think positively. Devoted time to your job search; strategize, plan, set goals and keep good records.6. Be flexible. Be willing to move and work in a different geographic location than you had planned; consider doing a different kind of work or working in a different industry other than what you believe would be ideal; if necessary, consider a lower starting salary than you had hoped for – at least to start with.7. Become active in professional organizations. Start establishing contacts; volunteer your time; ask about job search services or job databases that may be available to members. For more info visit Using Professional Associations.8. Network! Networking is a critical part of how most people find their first jobs, and in a competitive job market it becomes particularly important. Join professional organizations and take advantage of every opportunity to meet and interact with professionals in your fields of interest, extend your knowledge of preferred career fields, find out who is hiring and get personal referrals to hiring managers.Contacts are anyone you know - ANYONE. When first creating your list, don’t exclude those who aren't working in your field or due to thinking they may not know anyone of interest to you. You don’t know their network! Let your contacts know what you would like to pursue and ask if they know of anyone you could talk with related to your interests.RIT’s Alumni Relations Office also provides graduating students and alumni with free access to the Alumni Online Community, which includes the Tiger Locator database. The Tiger Locator allows you to browse and connect with over 100,000 alumni contacts. Use the Advanced Search feature to find alumni working at companies you’re interested in!LinkedIn is the online tool for professionals and a very productive way to identify employers, potential contacts, alumni groups, industry affinity groups, specific job opportunities (internships/co-op, entry-level, experienced) and much more. Like your resume, you should spend some time creating a very well-written LinkedIn profile and include links to an on-line version of your resume, your own blogs if appropriate (professional), and examples of your work. Connect with RIT alumni – under the Network toolbar pick, select Find Alumni from the drop down. Join the RIT Career Services group. Visit our Networking & LinkedIn page for more advice on using LinkedIn!9. Consider the "hot" geographic areas. Review articles to identify areas with the most potential for your field. Read news from that area, use the web to identify employers/opportunities geographically. Contact a chamber of commerce for list of industries or employment fairs.10. Register with at least one employment agency. Contract firms are doing more hiring these days -often times it is a good way to get the foot your the door. It should cost you nothing and does not take much effort on your part. But ask questions about how their agency works and what your obligation will be. Check out Working with Search Firms for more info.11. Be Optimistic and Persistent. Inquire about each of your applications within a few days with an email or phone call. Be proactive - position yourself as a candidate that “wants the job the most”. One of the biggest weaknesses to a job search is being passive – make it easy for a potential employer to connect with you, effort should be on your part. Employers respond to job seekers who make the extra effort to write follow-up thank you notes and continue to reconfirm interest. 12. Fake it - even if you are not feeling very confident, it is important to project a positive attitude. You have to believe you are the best person for the job before you can convince others that you are. Be prepared going into an interview. Preparation will alleviate some of your nervousness and you will appear more relaxed and confident.13. Don’t give up. Everyone knows that the economy is not great right now – but that doesn’t mean that you should postpone looking for a job until it improves. Jobs are out there you just need to be more flexible and work harder to get one.Good luck! And please don't hesitate to ask for help -- 585-475-2301.

Spring 2014 Student Newsletter

Fri, 04/11/2014 - 9:55am

JOB ZONE E-NEWS Spring 2014TOPICS:  Job Zone Tip| Evaluating Job Offers  | Still Looking for a Job? We can Help! | Upcoming Events |  Connect with us on Social Media

Job Zone Tip: Search Agents

How to Use Search AgentsSchedule a search agent to run and "ping" you with new job postings. Using the search agent tool in Job Zone is one of the most effective ways for you learn about job opportunities! Also use a saved search – saves time.How To: Go to Jobs/select Advanced Search/check Save As check box/ pick your criteria (the less you pick the better)/Submit. Now this search will show on Search Agent Tab under Jobs. Select your saved search and Schedule it to run.
Evaluating Job Offers

It is that time of year when students are getting co-op job offers and graduating students are weighing jobs after graduation. An offer is comprised of more than a salary. Carefully weigh all the important factors listed below in considering the offer and don't hesitate to discuss any questions or concerns you may have with your program coordinator in our office. (Visit our Evaluating Offers and Salary Negotiation page for more information).

  •   Job content or nature of the work
  •   Your future boss
  •   Salary and benefits
  •   Co-workers and corporate culture
  •   Typical work week
  •   Location
Acknowledge receipt of all job offers right away and pursue one of the following options:

Accepting/Rejecting an OfferJob offer options:
  •   Stall - Not Ready To Make A Decision: Express appreciation for the offer. Tell them that because this is an important decision you would like some time to carefully think about it. Agree on a reasonable time frame to get back to the company. You should not need to accept any offer on the spot. If you are waiting to hear back from other companies with whom you have interviewed, contact those companies and find out when they will be making a decision, informing candidates, and, if you can, find out whether you are being considered for the position.
  •  Accept - You Really Want This Job: Show your appreciation for the offer. Ask the employer to confirm the offer in writing. Do not interview for any other positions. Reject all other offers immediately by telephone or e-mail. Report your job to the Office of Co-op and Career Services. 
  •   Reject - Thanks, But No Thanks: Express appreciation for the offer. Say something positive about the organization and be diplomatic.

Ethics of Accepting/Rejecting an OfferOnce you accept a co-op job offer, even verbally, you must not back out, or renege on the job, to work for another employer. If you have any questions/concerns about this, discuss with your program coordinator before taking action! Good employer relations are vital to RIT's relationship with employers, and you, the student, are a critical link in this relationship. In addition, reneging on an offer could damage your chances of future employment with that company or with that person. Therefore, consider carefully before accepting a position.
  •   Discuss offers thoroughly with employers so you understand the terms and reach a mutually acceptable date to respond to their offer. 
  •   Request extensions from employers if you need more time to consider other offers. Do not ignore deadline dates you have agreed upon.
  •   Notify employers that you are accepting or rejecting an offer as soon as you make your decision - never later than the arranged date.  
  •   Once you accept a job offer, immediately inform other employers who have offers pending that you are no longer available (be sure to thank them for their time and consideration). Honor your acceptance of an offer as a contractual agreement with the employer. 
  •   Cancel any other scheduled interviews or on-site visits.

Recommended Resources:RIT Student/Graduate Salary page http://www.rit.edu/emcs/oce/students/salary. Compare you offers (co-op and entry level) with the data we collect from RIT students.Glassdoor We have Unlimited Glassdoor access for RIT students and alumni! Glassdoor provides an inside look at salaries, reviews and interview questions posted by employees at over 100,000 organizations. Content includes actual interview questions and reviews for specific employers from previous interview candidates; specific salary, bonus, and commission details; and reviews of the company culture and working conditionsSalary.com Salary wizard, compensation, cost of living calculators, negotiation tips and more.

Still Looking For a Job? We Can Help!


If you’re still looking for a job, it’s important to take advantage of all available resources through the RIT Office of Co-op and Career Services and develop a comprehensive job search strategy. Here are some tips and resources you may find helpful.

Use all our Office’s services and resources. You have FREE lifetime access to our office’s services! (Even after you graduate). Many resources and connections to social media are through our site www.rit.edu.oce.

Meet with your Program Coordinator to have your resume and other job search correspondence reviewed and for tips to strengthen your job search strategy. Your Program Coordinator is also a great source of job search resources and industry information specific to your career field. Get a job search diagnosis and move ahead with fresh focus.

Continue to use RIT Job Zone to search for opportunities – make sure your search criteria is not too narrow. Using multiple sources is smart – but don’t ignore some of the most obvious. Have you uploaded your most recent resume? Set up a search agent that will email you with new postings, use it as a saved search. Instructions are on the main Job Zone page.
Find job boards and professional organizationsspecific to your field on our web site – from the Student page's top navigation bar, select “Web Resource Lists” on that page are general sites like Vault, CareerSearch, Glassdoor and Internships.com that we subscribe to. There are also numerous major-specific lists to choose from.
Attend career fairs, company networking sessions, info sessions and job search workshops – all listed on our site www.rit.edu/careerevents. There are often speakers and programs throughout the university as well that may spark an interest or offer a connection.

Networking is a critical part of how most people find their first jobs, and in a competitive job market it becomes particularly important. Join professional organizations and take advantage of every opportunity to meet and interact with professionals in your fields of interest, extend your knowledge of preferred career fields, find out who is hiring and get personal referrals to hiring managers.

Contacts are anyone you know - ANYONE. When first creating your list, don’t exclude those who aren't working in your field or due to thinking they may not know anyone of interest to you. You don’t know their network! Let your contacts know what you would like to pursue and ask if they know of anyone you could talk with related to your interests.

RIT’s Alumni Relations Office also provides graduating students and alumni with free access to the Alumni Online Community, which includes the Tiger Locator database. The Tiger Locator allows you to browse and connect with over 100,000 alumni contacts. Use the Advanced Search feature to find alumni working at companies you’re interested in!
Use LinkedIn (www.linkedin.com) an online tool for professionals and a very productive way to identify employers, potential contacts, alumni groups, industry affinity groups, specific job opportunities (internships/co-op, entry-level, experienced) and much more. Like your resume, you should spend some time creating a very well-written LinkedIn profile and include links to an on-line version of your resume, your own blogs if appropriate (professional), and examples of your work. Connect with RIT alumni – under the Network toolbar pick, select Find Alumni from the drop down. Join the RIT Career Services group. Visit our Networking & LinkedIn page for more advice on using LinkedIn!
Be Flexible. Be willing to move and work in a different geographic location than you had planned; consider doing a different kind of work or working in a different industry other than what you believe would be ideal; if necessary, consider a lower starting salary than you had hoped for – at least to start with.

Be Optimistic and Persistent. Inquire about each of your applications within a few days with an email or phone call. Be proactive - position yourself as a candidate that “wants the job the most”. One of the biggest weaknesses to a job search is being passive – make it easy for a potential employer to connect with you, effort should be on your part.
Employers respond to job seekers who make the extra effort to write follow-up thank you notes and continue to reconfirm interest.

Consider Temporary Agencies. Temp agencies or employment agencies provide another gateway into organizations or fields of interest. Temping or contract work is a great way to get your foot in the door, network, and prove yourself.
Target Growth Industries. Set your sights on industries and sectors that have strong hiring needs including professional, scientific and technical services; healthcare and social assistance; educational services, government, manufacturing.

Overall, try to remain positive – with persistence and a good job search strategy in place something will come through for you! Remember too that we are always here to help. If you would like to schedule an appointment to discuss your search, please contact us at 585.475.2301.
Upcoming Events
[for a complete list, visit http://www.rit.edu/careerevents]

ROC TECH SHOWCASEThursday, April 10, 2014
12-2pm Golisano College Atrium – Company Exhibits and NetworkingWondering what’s new & exciting in Rochester? Join us as local companies demonstrate and display their technologies!Stop by and find out all of the interesting things many of our Rochester area companies are doing. ROC Tech Showcase is an informal opportunity for you to meet CTOs, business owners and computing experts, learn about local innovation, the skills necessary for success in the computing field, and what career paths and opportunities may be of interest to you! List of Participating Companies:CaterTrax, iCardiac Technologies Inc, Innovative Solutions, IP.com, NimbleUser, OffSiteDataSync, OS-Cubed Inc, Paychex, Rochester Clinical Research, Rochester Software Associates, SMP, Star Fantasy Leagues, Inc, Syncurity Networks, The Gleason Works, Vnomics, Corp
At the conclusion of the showcase, RIT graduate, Tristan O’Tierney, co-founder of mobile payment company, Square, will speak in the Golisano Hall Auditorium at 2:30 that afternoon. His entrepreneurial success can be an inspiration to all of us!All RIT students and alumni are welcome to attend.
Co-sponsored by the Golisano College of Computing and Information Sciences Dean's Advisory Board and the Office of Co-op and Career Services.http://www.rit.edu/emcs/oce/students/roc-tech-showcase  
CAREER WEEK APRIL 7-11  

“May the Odds Be Ever in Your Favor.” Let us help you navigate your way through the job search arena and come out a victor!  You will need training, a strategy and an ally.   Advice and free swag available throughout the week; candy, giveaways, RIT T-shirts and Hunger Games DVD’s – all part of the spoils available at the cornucopia! To request an interpreter for any Career Week events, go to: https://myaccess.rit.edu/2/
TUESDAY APRIL 8, 2014Tick, Tock….Tick, Tock The clock is ticking but it’s not time to panic! Let the Co-op and Career Services staff help you navigate your way through the job search arena and come out a victor. (Offered Monday through Thursday)
11:30am-1:30pm
SAU Lobby
Don’t go Hungry, Hunt for Your Future: Finding the Right Career with Your Major
2-3pm
CCL Bamboo Room
Happy Hunger Games!
The job search games are tough even on the most experienced tributes. Come learn strategies for stress reduction to remain relaxed and in control.
3-4pm
CCL Bamboo RoomWEDNESDAY APRIL 9, 2014Tick, Tock….Tick, Tock The clock is ticking but it’s not time to panic! Let the Co-op and Career Services staff help you navigate your way through the job search arena and come out a victor. (Offered Monday through Thursday)
11:30am-1:30pm
SAU Lobby
How to Evaluate Competing Job Offers
12-1pm
Eastman 3381
Find Your Own Haymitch: Meet-A-Mentor
(Food provided!)
12-1pm
SAU Interfaith Ctr, Skalny
How to Keep Your Winnings: 12 Financial Mistakes & How To Avoid them with Adam Mark
3-4pm
B&L A190
THURSDAY APRIL 10, 2014Tick, Tock….Tick, Tock The clock is ticking but it’s not time to panic! Let the Co-op and Career Services staff help you navigate your way through the job search arena and come out a victor. (Offered Monday through Thursday)
11:30am-1:30pm
SAU Lobby
Become a Gamemaker
How I Became an Entrepreneur: With Tristan O’Tierney (co-founder of Square, a mobile payment company).
2:30pm-3:30pm
GOL - 1400
Victor’s Village
A panel of young professionals who have won the Job Search Games
5:30-6:30pm
SAU Interfaith Cntr, Skalny – food provided
FRIDAY APRIL 11, 2014Prepare for Your Tribute Interview: Mock Interviews
Practice and get feedback on your interviewing skills.
9am-12pm
B&L CenterUpdate: This session is FILLED – you can make an appointment to practice interviewing with your program coordinator by calling 475-2301.

Connect With Us On Social Media

In the Office of Cooperative Education and Career Services, we strive to provide effective and personalized career education. One way we do that is by connecting with students, alumni, employers and community partners in their own language and on their own timeframe – through social media! We use social media to share information and events, create conversation and interchange, and respond to questions and feedback! We want to be the platform for employers to connect to YOU, and you all to connect to each other and our office. Visit our official accounts and join the exchange! Links to all of our social media sites can be found on our home page, http://www.rit.edu/emcs/oce/




We’re on Twitter
Co-op & Career Services uses Twitter to share the latest information, pictures, and resources throughout the day and during career events. We frequently feature advice, articles, employer visits, key dates, live tweeting of events and sometimes even giveaways. We like to converse with students and alumni by answering questions and tweeting back. Twitter is the most personal of all our accounts, so it’s the best to get primary information from us and directly connect to employers. Follow our account, @RITCareers
We Have an Interest in PinterestFood, art, fashion – and now career inspiration. Co-op & Career Services has joined Pinterest. Discover the latest advice on interview attire, resume writing, and words of encouragement like this: “If you can dream it, you can do it.” These words from Walt Disney are enough to get me through interviews! Find the latest career tips by following and repinning our boards, http://pinterest.com/ritcareerserv





Don’t Be Left Out: Become LinkedInLinkedIn is a professional networking site that allows you to connect with like-minded professionals, groups, and discussions. Networking is a key component of job and co-op searches; so begin now. Connect with Co-op and Career Service’s LinkedIn group, along with over 3,000 students, alumni, and employers! We have up-to-date job postings and discussions waiting for you. Visit http://www.linkedin.com/groups?home=&gid=4577501&trk=anet_ug_hm



Become a part of our timelineWe like you, will you like us on Facebook? Find the latest information about Co-op & Career Services events. We welcome shares, likes, comments, any engagement from you! Connect with our Co-op & Career Services Facebook page, https://www.facebook.com/RITCareerServices






Be our “You” in “Youtube”
RIT’s Co-op & Career Services’ Career Channel provides relevant and engaging videos on job search strategies, career fair, interview tips, and much more. Videos feature our staff, co-op students, alumni, recruiters, and employers. You should view our videos and improve your skills! Visit www.youtube.com/user/RITCoopCareer   

Matt Purcell - Orlando, Florida (Walt Disney World)

Wed, 03/19/2014 - 11:01am



Where are you co-oping? Give us a brief overview of what your co-op is

I did two co-op terms with the Planning and Industrial Engineering department at Walt Disney World. My first was March-August 2012 where I supported clients from the Park Operations line of business. There I was primarily focused on projects at Disney’s Hollywood Studios related to attraction operations—wait time models, standard attraction loading procedures, and increasing throughput and efficiency. My second term was from August-December 2013 where I supported Distribution Services working on warehouse utilization, forecasting future SKU growth, and facility layout.
  How did you assert yourself into company culture?
The Disney Company is rich with heritage and culture. To align myself with the company culture I made sure to sign up for every opportunity the came along outside of my daily responsibilities. I took part in Cast Member activities such as recreation leagues, backstage tours, volunteer events, and signed up for front-line shifts in the theme parks some weekends.
How did you meet other co-op students, or interns?
There are thousands of college students working at Walt Disney World between Professional Internships (co-ops) and the Disney College Program there are a variety of opportunities to meet others. Most of my closest friends from my co-op came from intern housing and housing events. Also, I met tons of other interns during backstage tours, volunteer events, and at work.
What do you do outside of work?
Disney provides its Cast Members with unlimited admission to the theme parks—so I spent a lot of time riding rides and having a blast in the parks. Outside of work I spent a time enjoying the other attractions in the Orlando area such as SeaWorld, Universal, and Busch Gardens. Also, my roommates and I took day trips to Tampa, Naples, and Cocoa Beach. Also, during my first internship at Disney some friends and I flew to California to visit Disneyland. Orlando is a great place, there’s never a dull moment.
What’s your favorite part about the city/location you are in?
Orlando’s weather is beautiful. Although the summers are hot, the sky is always bright and blue. In addition to the weather there are more things to do in Central Florida than there is time to do it. Between the short distances to the Gulf or Atlantic Ocean, attractions, restaurants, professional sports, and festivals there is always a unique experience ready to be had.
 Give us your favorite co-op memory so far
My favorite memory from co-op at Disney was being in one of the theme parks before they were open for the day. There are few things as magical in the world as seeing the sunrise over the Magic Kingdom castle and realizing that you work there.
What’s one tip you would give to other students on co-op currently?

Get excited over any project work you’re given. Often, interns don’t get the most exhilarating responsibilities at first—but showing that you can put your skills to work on even the dull projects speaks a lot about your personality. Also, take time to network with the other departments in your company. It provides you a better understanding on how your company operates, sets you up for future job opportunities, and most of all it helps you know exactly what type of work interests you.

Following Up

Wed, 03/12/2014 - 11:20am
So you went to the Career Fair, or any networking event and you met some important people, shared some contact info, and now you've been staring at your email inbox with sweaty palms for days.  Well we’re here to fix that. We want to share with you the importance of the “follow-up” and how to handle it for different situations.

Career Fair/Networking Event


Okay so there are some things you should do at these events (and if you didn't, there are some things you can do and we can get to that later).

  • ALWAYS get a contact (preferably business card) and really engrave their name into your brain
  • If they don’t give you a time frame they’ll contact you, ask them when to expect an email/phone call
  • Email them right after the event thanking them for their time and information (also consider reattaching the documents you gave them in person just to be safe). Include any information you may have forgot to mention as well. 


So if you’re still within that time frame and haven’t heard anything, you have nothing to worry about. Once you pass 24 hours after that time frame, shoot them an email reminded them of who you are, when you talked with them and what you talked about.

Remember when we said there are things you can do if you missed one of those steps during the event? Well luckily our office is full of staff members who work directly with these recruiters, which means you can email your program coordinator asking for the recruiter contact of a specific company


Interview



The interview follow up is arguably more important than the initial one. Remember, this is the best of the best now, and small things can help them filter out who they hire. Make sure you...


  • Email them within 24 hours thanking them for the interview opportunity
  • Include any information you forgot to mention a the interview
  • In the email, use specific names and information of things they gave you. The more you show that you listened and retained knowledge from the interview, the better you look.



In any situation in your life where you need information from somebody, following up is vital. It shows that you take initiative and that you’re confident. It doesn't have to be just for obtaining a job, but in your career when you need to contact a client, or even in general with a friend/family member. Don’t be timid, and you’ll earn respect and possibly, in this case, a job. 

Be A Sponge - An Interview With Intuit's Ron Jones

Tue, 02/25/2014 - 3:30pm
Ron Jones, VP Product Development, Intuit Inc.We had the pleasure to talk to Ron Jones, who was on campus recruiting for Intuit, and we want to share some words of wisdom from a company representative and former co-op student from the University of Cincinnati.
Why does Intuit have a co-op program? What’s the point?

“We’re really about helping students with their careers… We want people coming out of universities to have great experiences, bring in great innovation and find their passion.”

The co-op program is about learning and growing. Employers are there to learn from the experience and to see if there can be further chemistry for a potential full-time position.

Ron phrased it by saying, “Coming out of college, you want to be a sponge in a bucket” absorbing from those around you and the experiences you go through.

How can students ensure they will further themselves in the screening process?

“It boils down to skills. There’s a quote by a football coach that goes something like, ‘Lead with skill while on the field, lead with example off the field, but always show your love of the game.’”

And for those of you who are jaded by sports metaphors…

Skills on the field: Sharing your technical skills during a technical interview and thinking on your feet
Leading off the field: Show how you used the skills on your resume
Love the game: Show your passion about your industry and field

But can you get a job with just technical skills and no soft skills? The answer is no -- it is important to have strengths in both areas.

“If you get a 50% on a test, you’ll get an F. You can be the best technical person but if you don’t have the soft skills, it’s just not going to work.”
How do you know if the work you are doing as a co-op is the right path for your future career?

“Your brain is always engaged, if you’re truly passionate about it it’s truly hard to turn off. You have to show all of that in this brief moment in time.”

So aside from being a sponge, how can students get the most out of their co-op experience?
It’s not all about passing classes and learning, but the passion to want to learn. This has to happen when you’re on co-op and when you’re not on co-op. If you absorb every moment of your co-op and spend time outside of work and classes to learn, you will get the most from your co-op and it will help you land your next big co-op (or your dream full-time job after graduation).

How can you help with that process? Ron talked about having mentors.

“If you come to Intuit, you get assigned 2 mentors. They are usually recent college grads so still have that passion. What you can do is bring yourself to work every day, 100% of yourself.”

Your mentors aren't doing you a favor to expect some kind of return. They are also very passionate about what they do, and they see that in you. They sincerely want you to grow because they care. To reflect that respect, it’s important to give them your all if they’re giving you their time and wisdom.

As convenient as Intuit makes it, sometimes you won’t have assigned mentors. Ron didn't have specified mentors for his co-ops in college, but found mentor figures in his managers. Sometimes it’s up to you to take that step forward in your career because…

“As a co-op student you are in charge of your career, don’t let someone else drive your career”

 So get excited about the Spring Career Fair Wednesday because this is your time, your career, your passion and you are in the driver’s seat.  


Written by Tom Weekes
Bold quotes from an interview with Ron Jones,VP Product Development, Intuit, Inc.

Are YOU Ready for the Spring Career Fair?

Wed, 02/19/2014 - 11:28am

Fortunately for you we have materials on ALL of these items

Researching Companies:

http://www.rit.edu/emcs/oce/students/researching-companies

Resume Writing:

http://www.rit.edu/emcs/oce/students/intro-resume-writing

Social Media (LinkedIn and more):

http://www.rit.edu/emcs/oce/student/Job-Searching-with-Social-Media

60 Second Commercial:

http://www.rit.edu/emcs/oce/students/intro-career-fairs#2.1

What to Wear:

http://www.rit.edu/emcs/oce/students/interviewing#1.3

Interviewing:

http://www.rit.edu/emcs/oce/students/interviewing

And if that wasn't enough, you can also read up on general information about the fair

Intro to Career Fairs:

http://www.rit.edu/emcs/oce/students/intro-career-fairs


Written by Tom Weekes

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