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RIT Office of Career Services posts articles related focused on careers or job search strategies.Gretchenhttp://www.blogger.com/profile/13425867744995994091noreply@blogger.comBlogger137125
Updated: 31 min 1 sec ago

Remember When Our Office Gave You Dating Tips?

Fri, 02/14/2014 - 11:57am


You’re probably thinking to yourself, “Woah! Wait did I miss that blog post?!” and are now anxiously navigating the search bar. Hold on there pal. What we are trying to say is that the tips we gave you about finding a job are pretty much the same as going on a date.

Don’t look so disappointed. Let us explain and maybe you’ll get a job and a date by February 26th (The Spring Career Fair!)

Doing Your Research:


STOP! No that does NOT mean creep on all of your potential love interests on Facebook. Seriously. Stop that.

Have you ever went on a date with someone and found out they are friends with your ex and you think to yourself “Oh God this is awkward, please let this stop, I need to get out of here, where’s the waitress with that water I WANT THE CHECK”? Or you find out they want to move to California and you want to move to NYC? Well the questions you ask an employer get to the same issues. Does the chemistry match? Your job/employer is your partner in a different sense, but can be affected by the same problems. Know what you want and also know what they want.
So when you’re looking for a job you need to do your research on a few things, the first being the employer. Does the company fit in with your goals? Do your qualifications match up? Is their long term objective (including geographical location) make sense with what you want to do 10 years from now. You don’t want to jump into anything, you want to get a feel for what you want and what they want and how you can compromise those two things. See that last sentence sounds like advice you get about dating someone isn't it? You don’t want to commit to something and have it be an awkward discovery that… well… it isn't going to work out. A company might imply that you can be a manager within a year. Does that commitment scare or worry you? A date might bring up goals to get married and have children one day. Does that commitment scare or worry you? Point proven.

**Side note you probably shouldn't talk about marriage or children on the first date

First Impressions:


Picking your nose. Scratching yourself. Not showering. Only talking about your cats.
What do these things have in common? BINGO! They won’t get you a second date… or a job… or friends… okay you get the point. Bottom line is that your first impression in ANY social scenario matters SO much. There isn't an absolute seal of fate that you will get a date, or a job, or whatever the situation might be. Sometimes it literally comes down to the first impression. Maybe you did your research as mentioned before and you’d be a perfect fit, but it gets screwed up by something awkward and unplanned. You can’t plan for everything BUT you can try. Put on your nicest clothes, shower and maybe put a little cologne/perfume on (emphasis on A LITTLE), comb your hair, and (it sounds tacky) have a list of things to talk about in your head.  For a date maybe you want to get to know more about the other person so you have ideas of things you want to talk about. Well with companies you also want to know more about them so you should have a list of questions and conversation starters as well. Just have self-awareness when you meet. Be aware of your body language and how you look to the other person. This might staring into a mirror once in a while, or whatever it means to you.

Be Yourself!



You know what people like the most? People. Real people, not robots. It seems so risky in BOTH the dating and job search scenarios to just be yourself because you think, “What if they hate the real me”, well we’re sorry to break it to you but your employer and/or your partner will find out who your real self is eventually. Unlike in electronic stores, when you wear around a proverbial “what you see is what you get sign”, it is more reassuring. What are employers for? Someone they can work with 40 hours a week.
What is your partner inevitably looking for? Someone they can live with… like forever.
No, not technical skills, not abilities (that doesn't mean those aren't important, but they do take the back burner). So make sure to show your personality. You would hire someone you like, and you will date someone you like (as obvious as that sounds). So show yourself, stand away from the crowd. 



Pretty much what we are trying to say is that you need to treat both of these things the same way and what you will notice about most things in life, is that everything requires similar work, objectives, steps, etc. and that everything you learn can help you in other fields of interest in your life. 
Alright we're done being philosophical, so Happy Valentines Day! Now go get a date... er.. we mean job. Or both. Yeah go get both. 


Written by Tom Weekes

Working with Search Firms

Thu, 01/30/2014 - 10:27am

What is a Search Firm?

What exactly are search firms and how can you use them to your best advantage? Using a search firm can be a good job search strategy because with little effort on your part, your resume will be submitted to openings that may not be advertised. Using a search firm can be an integral part of your job search, but don’t limit yourself to this one resource. Use all available resources, contacts, and job listing sites to conduct a thorough job search.

Employers use search firms when they do not have the time or expertise to fill positions using their own resources. Reasons may include the need to fill contract positions, rapid company growth, interest in luring a competitor to the company, a needed internal change requiring an outsider, or higher level or specialized openings where there are fewer qualified candidates. A company may work with one preferred search firm or several firms.

Recruiters earn a living by identifying, selecting the best candidate for a specific job vacancy, and placing candidates for their clients. They usually understand the sector or industry they work within and many were once employed in the very discipline or industry in which they specialize.

Search firms are typically divided into large global companies or small specialists or “boutiques”. Global search firms can be organized either as highly centralized and integrated or as independently run branches or networks. Integrated firms can have more consistent standards and adopt a common way of conducting searches while branches can be more entrepreneurial. Boutique firms tend to be specialized by sector or industry niches, for example biotechnology, financial services media, software, and emerging technologies.


How Search Firms Work

Before approaching a firm, it is important to know how they work. The search firm exists to help client companies find employees, not to help people find jobs (even though that is the outcome)! The client company pays their fee. Fees are usually a percentage of the annual salary for the position being filled. Positions can range from entry level to upper level for experienced individuals. Many recruiters try to coax individuals already working into making a change based on motivating factors including advancement, greater challenges, different management style and company direction. It’s not uncommon for a recruiter to place the same candidate numerous times in their career.

The process usually includes the following: the recruiter creates an initial list of possible candidates for an assignment, these candidates are then screened and appraised to create the final short list of highest quality individuals (usually 3-4 contenders who have all expressed real interest in the position) presented by the recruiter to the client. The client will then interview the short listed candidates possibly resulting in an offer to the best candidate. Hiring decisions are always made by the client.

Be aware that in your initial conversation and evaluation as a potential candidate, the recruiter may not divulge confidential information about the client or position until after you have been identified as a legitimate candidate. Even then, there are times when certain client information must remain confidential. 

Types of Search Firms

Search firms can run from "traditional" temporary help services such as office/clerical and industrial to firms that provide more highly skilled workers in technical and professional areas. They can offer a wide range of employment-related services and solutions to their client companies, including temporary and contract staffing, recruiting and permanent placement, outsourcing and outplacement, training, and human resource consulting.

For contract and temporary services, the jobs may last from a few hours, to several months or even years depending on the industry. The contract employee may be paid directly by the client company or they may work for and be paid by the staffing agency. A company may contract regularly to handle peak production or seasonal periods, special projects, and to supplement their permanent workforce. This may include the use of temporary-to-permanent hiring- a concept where a client company plans to make a permanent placement hiring decision during or after a temporary help assignment.

Executive Search Firms mainly recruit for exempt-level managers or professionals at an executive level. The recruiter is sometimes referred to as a “headhunter”. Headhunters are generally considered more aggressive than in-house recruiters or may have preexisting industry experience and contacts.


How You Can Use Search Firms


Choosing a Firm

As with any potential employer, do your homework before selecting a search firm with which to work. Research to gather information on industries and functions served, geographic locations, and whether they are general or boutique firms. Check their legitimacy as a recruiting agency, review their website, and get information on their reputation by asking for references and some of their clients. Above all, do not sign with a search firm who tries to charge you a fee; reputable agencies collect their fees from the client companies for which they fill positions.


Connecting with a Search Firm

How do you approach a firm with whom you are interested in working? Here are some tips for making that initial connection, and developing a productive relationship:
  • Get a referral to the company from a client, colleague or friend who has worked with the firm. A recommendation from a known source will put you at the top of their candidate pile. 
  • Contact a specific person within the firm, preferably the contact for your field of interest, if the firm represents many industries. You will be better able to establish a connection with someone who shares your industry knowledge and interests. 
  • Be professional and ethical at all times; respect your relationship with the recruiter and treat them as an employer. Limit the number of recruiting firms with which you work, and if you do work with multiple firms, let them know, so they don’t promote you to the same employer. Also, don’t “back door” the firm, or go behind their backs to send your resume directly to the client company. 
  • It’s important to establish a good rapport with the recruiter, so he/she can represent you well to their client companies. Make sure you feel comfortable with the recruiter and fairly treated by the firm. 
  • Give the recruiter specifics on what type of job you’re looking for, so they don’t waste their and their clients’ time; discuss things like preferred location, job type, and salary range in detail. 
  • For Executive Search firms, you may wish to register with Blue Steps https://www.bluesteps.com, a service of the Association of Executive Search Consultants, to raise your visibility within the search firm community, as reputable firms use this service to search for candidates. 
  • Employment Crossing has a good list of agencies by focus areas with a nice ranking: http://www.employmentcrossing.com/recruiter-ranking/ 


What Recruiters Look For in a Candidate

Recruiters will be selling you to potential clients, so they will select candidates based on a combination of experiences, achievements, relevant skills, and personal attributes which match well with their clients’ needs.


Maintaining a Relationship with a Recruiter

Once you’ve begun working with a recruiter, you will both need to put forth effort to maintain a productive relationship.
  • Realize how search firms work and work with them within these parameters. The recruiter works for their client companies, not for you. You are a resource they use to fill their open positions. 
  • Give the recruiter a list of companies that you would like to work for; it’s possible they may have contacts at these companies, and can check for available positions that may fit your qualifications. 
  • If the recruiter sets you up for an interview with a client company, get as much information about the company as possible before the interview, so you can research and prepare for the interview. 
  • Be realistic -- research the industry and salary norms so that your expectations are in line with the market. 
  • Keep in contact -- email the recruiter at least once a week to demonstrate your enthusiasm. This will keep you in the forefront of the recruiter’s mind, and they’ll hopefully make more effort to place you. 
  • Once you accept a position at a client company, continue to ask the recruiter for advice, or if you have any concerns or problems.

60 Second Commercial

Thu, 01/16/2014 - 9:08am
The SituationYou’re at a career fair, in an interview or at a networking event. You shake hands with the recruiter – then what? The 60 second commercial (or “elevator speech”) is an introduction you can use in a number of different scenarios that quickly explains who you are, what your interests and goals are and what you know about the company.
If you have thought this through ahead of time, you will be able to make the most of your brief conversation and hopefully it will lead to an interview!
The GoalsTo quickly articulate what you want, leave a positive impression, and create interest in you as a candidate.
How to Create Your CommercialAsk yourself:
1.        Who are you?
Name__________________________________________________________________________
Year level_______________________________________________________________________
Major/Minor____________________________________________________________________

2.        What are you looking for?_______________________________________________________________________________
3.        What have you done? What are your accomplishments?_______________________________________________________________________________
4.        What interests you about this company?______________________________________________________________________________
5.        Closing/next step_______________________________________________________________________________

6.        Put it all together!

Examples
Hi my name is _________________. I will be graduating/just graduated from ______ with a degree in __________________. I am looking for ___________. I found in my research that your company is strong in_____________________. I’m very interested in finding out more about the opportunities you have. May I have your business card so I can follow up with you?
Hi my name is ______________. I am a ____________major. I’m looking for a co-op in corporate finance. In my last co-op at XYZ Company I was able to gain valuable experience in _________________. I know that your company specializes in _________. I would be very interested in hearing about any opportunities you may have in this field. 
“Good morning/afternoon, I’m______.  I have reviewed the job posting listed on the RIT website and am interested in ___________.  I have applied for this position(s) through your website and would like the opportunity to discuss my qualifications in greater detail.  I will be graduating in May with a degree in ________, and through my co-ops, have gained the experience you are looking for.
“Good morning/afternoon, I’m______. I am a ______year student majoring in ______.   I have reviewed your co-op job posting/s listed on RIT website and I am interested in ___________.  I have already applied for this/these position(s) through your website and would like the opportunity to discuss my qualifications in greater detail. Through numerous class projects, I have experience in__________.

Do’s & Don’ts
§  Do research the company§  Do make your commercial sound natural and unrehearsed§  Do make it memorable§  Do practice it§  Do project friendliness, confidence, enthusiasm§  Do end with action items – i.e. collect a business card or contact information§  Do follow up with the recruiter§  Don’t make the conversation focused on what you want, rather what you can do §  Don’t ask: “So what does your company do??” -- This will turn off the recruiter immediately§  Don’t ramble or take up too much of the recruiters time§  Don’t be disappointed if you are asked to apply for an opening through the company website. You have not wasted your time. Many companies need to track candidates through their site.

Rochester Institute of Technology Office of Co-op and Career ServicesOffice of Cooperative Education and Career Services 57 Lomb Memorial Drive · Rochester, NY 14623 · (585) 475-2301
www.rit.edu/co-op/careers 

Spring Career Fair: February 26, 2014!

Thu, 01/16/2014 - 9:03am
SPRING CAREER FAIR
Career Fair: Wednesday, February 26, 2014 from 11am-4pm
Interview Day: Thursday, February 27, 2014
Rochester Institute of Technology, Gordon Field House
All majors, all levels of jobs. Open to RIT students and alumni only.

Holiday Message from RIT's Office of Co-op and Career Services

Fri, 12/20/2013 - 2:17pm



We would like to wish all of our friends the very best!From the RIT Co-op and Career Services staff

5 Things You Need to do Over Intersession

Wed, 12/11/2013 - 10:57am

We know what you're thinking, "Intersession? Let me just curl up into a ball and disappear for 6 weeks" but HOLD ON don't do that... yet. First things first... 

Update EVERYTHING


So you have just spent 15 weeks busy with classes, clubs, side projects, and work, everything that makes college life a roller coaster. You may have put a couple things on the back burner, including eating, sleeping and basic hygiene. Something that probably also slipped in that "did-not-do" list is your career search. If you’re not actively looking for a co-op or job (and sometimes even when you are), it’s hard to fit it in your schedule, so intersession is the PERFECT time to do so. You may still have work and family to attend to, but chances are you have a lot more free time. Take this time to update your resume, LinkedIn profile (and join LinkedIn groups, including our own RIT Career Services one), set up a professional Twitter account, create/update your portfolio (or personal website), make a cover letter template that you can modify for different applications, and anything else you can think of. Also upload your resume to RIT Job Zone so that employers can look at it on their own accord and so that you can apply right from there. That way you can go into spring with everything fresh and ready to go.
Here are some good resources gathered by our office to read:
Resume writing: http://www.rit.edu/emcs/oce/students/intro-resume-writing
Making a good LinkedIn account: http://university.linkedin.com/university/global/en_us/index/linkedin-for-students.html
Putting together a portfolio: http://www.rit.edu/emcs/oce/students/portfolio-preparation
Cover letters: http://www.rit.edu/emcs/oce/students/letters-employers

Network


During the holiday season there are A LOT of networking opportunities. There may be work holiday parties (even if it’s your part-time job, or maybe get your parents to invite you along to their office party), community events and much more. Can’t really find the opportune moment to network? You can at least practice networking at a regular family/friend gathering or possibly invite your neighbors over for some small casual get together. If you have a large extended family party, make it a point to talk to members of your family you don’t normally talk to or haven’t in a long time. If you and your friends are having a holiday get together, make it a goal to meet someone new or catch up with an old friend. The trick is to treat it as if you ARE networking (because in all actuality, making friends IS building your network). Ask questions that you would ask at a networking event like, “So what kind of work are you up to?” or “What have you been doing outside of work?” and maybe try some basic name dropping like “Have you heard from ____ in a while?” Have a good back and forth with someone at a semi-professional level (you don’t have to do that the WHOLE time but just try it out, because you are an adult now and it’s nice to have an adult conversation once in a while). 

Clothes Shopping


Many of you complain that you need a suit, or certain dress clothes for interviews/career fairs mainly because you don’t own anything like that. This is the perfect time to go out and get some nice clothes/accessories. During the holidays, plenty of places have great deals on dress clothes. On top of that, you can always as for nice clothes as a gift for the holidays (it’s a step up from getting socks).
Men think about getting:
  • A man’s suit (a normal 2 piece is fine or just a blazer)
  • New ties (that match different shirts)
  • Button up shirts (plain colors and patterns like striped or checkered)
  • Black and/or brown dress shoes
  • Black/Brown dress socks
  • A nice dress belt
  • A watch (optional)
  • A padfolio/business cards

Women think about getting:
  •  Nice button up shirts or blouses
  •  A Blazer
  • Nice skirt
  • Heels/nice flats
  • Cardigan/nice sweater
  • A woman’s suit
  • A padfolio/business cards


   Check out our “Dress for Success” Pinterest boards: http://www.pinterest.com/ritcareerserv/


Plan NOW


Now you have everything in order, you just need to know what you’re getting yourself into. If you plan on attending the career fair in the spring for a co-op or a job after graduation, this is the time to start looking at potential employers and maybe connecting on LinkedIn/emailing them about your interest. If you’re not immediately looking for a co-op, at least plan when you are and get a handle on what you expect out of it (what kind of co-op you want, with what kind company and when?). This is also a time to set goals for yourself whether they are personal or specifically career related. Maybe by the end of intersession, learn how to use a new program, read 3 books, lose 10 pounds, get in touch with 3 recruiters, have a one-on-one with a manager, anything that will make YOU feel more actualized into the person YOU want to be. Personal and career goals are all intertwined because they affect each other, so plan achievable and practical goals.

Rest Up


Here's the tip you were hoping we'd say. You just fought through the trenches of RIT, battled some professors most likely, conquered finals… Now it’s time for a little R&R. To put it in perspective, the average college student gets about 6 hours of sleep a night (and maybe that’s a luxury for some of you). Studies have shown that getting 6 or less hours of sleep a night for a week straight affects your body the same as if you have gone without sleep for 48 hours (read more about that here: http://www.uhs.uga.edu/sleep/). With this math, the majority of you are legally dead. Therefore, GET SOME SLEEP. You deserve it. Resting up also doesn't just mean sleep, but having some you time. Play some video games, watch some movies, or maybe go on a weekend trip somewhere. This rest for your mind and body is crucial for your success over intersession and it carries over into the spring as well.

If you do these 5 things over intersession, we guarantee that you will be successful not only in the spring, but for the summer and fall as well. If you do this now, everything along the way will be basic maintenance (small touch-ups here and there). We want you to succeed and, more importantly, for you to WANT to succeed. However, we don’t want this to consume your break, so make sure you also take a deep breath and smell the roses along the way. Make 2014 a good year by starting in a good place.

Written by Tom Weekes 

Social Media - More Than Just Social

Wed, 11/27/2013 - 12:37pm



Maybe you’re on Instagram looking up #catsofinstagram, or Tumblr looking up reaction gifs. There are so many social media platforms with so much to do on them. They are a stress reliever, a good healthy distraction (to an extent), and a way to connect to become a part of a community. BUT did you know that now more than ever, companies are using social media to scout candidates for positions? This means that social media is beyond just for social use. It’s a job hunting tool. WHAT? Crazy right?!

Here are 5 tactics you can use on social media and where is the best place to use that tactic

1. Networking

Social media is PERFECT for networking. You can instantly connect with anyone.

LinkedIn – The term is literally “connect”. Instead of “friends” you build a network by just connecting with people. Once you connect you are 1stconnections. Here’s the thing, you become 2nd connections with their 1st connections. It continues for 3rd connections. By just connecting to 20 people, you could have a network of a couple thousand. Now any time you want a job, or know about a company, you can search that company and see who in your network has a connection with that company and reach out to them

2. Let them know you’re looking

You know when you’re interested in someone and you want them to know you’re interested by dropping hints here and there? It’s the same way with job searching (except don’t flirt with recruiters please).

Twitter – First off, you should have a professional Twitter. That way you can post articles relating to your field, live tweet events (like conferences), and all that real-world stuff without seeming boring to your friends. Try to be active on Twitter by following industry leaders, companies, recruiters, and professionals, anyone who can be relevant to your job search. Once you get a substantial amount of followers start dropping those hints. “Just updated my #resume to add my summer experience – check it out!” *insert link to where your resume is and tag accounts that of companies you are interested in*and BOOM, suddenly you’re in the dating… er... job search game. Other hints include announcing that you have an interview, “I have an interview with @Googlejobs today – wish me luck!” And now everyone knows you’re on the market. Just don’t be obnoxious.



3. Professional groups and lists

The best way to begin your job search is to organize and pinpoint your targets. Most social media platforms have ways to create groups and lists.

LinkedIn – Here there are “groups” and they range from hobbyists, professionals, residential, companies, pretty much anything. What you can do is join these groups, and discuss things with people of that same interest. Start a discussion about the latest stories from Wall Street in your professional business group, or a discussion about the latest movie release in your film fanatics group. It helps you connect with the right people

Facebook- Facebook has groups as well, but more so they have pages to like. Like company pages and don’t be afraid to engage with their status updates. On top of that, you can create “lists” as well. Create a professional list if you are friends with people who you might be considered more in your professional network. When you post a status you can select which list can and cannot see certain posts.
Twitter- You can create lists to organize your news feed. When you follow 100 people it’s manageable, but when you follow 2,000 suddenly your feed becomes a battle. Organize the people you follow into different lists (friends, work, news, and bands, whatever categories of accounts you follow). That way you can be more efficient with your Twitter use

4. Digital Portfolio

To be job searching online, it would be nice to have a reference of your work for employers to look at. This can range from digital files to Job Zone, making a personal website, or social media.

LinkedIn – LinkedIn has this great, fairly new feature where you can upload portfolio work on your profile page. You can even upload stuff to specific positions. So if you had a job with, let’s say, Microsoft you can upload work you did (that you’re allowed to post) underneath that job description. If you have classwork you want to show off, you can upload that underneath your educational experience from RIT. This is useful for anyone, but especially art/design students who practically need an online portfolio.

5. Clean up your act

You’ve probably seen a lot of our Digital Dirt info at review sessions on campus or on our webpage (if you haven’t, check it out: http://www.rit.edu/emcs/oce/student/Job-Searching-with-Social-Media#digital). Either way, a huge part about using social media to find a job is to be professional online. Look through your privacy settings and edit it the way you want. A good rule of thumb is…
Facebook should be 100% private and for social use (you can use it to find jobs through company pages, but don’t add recruiters or employers as Facebook friends and make sure only friends can see your content. Direct them to a personal brand page if you have one instead of your account).Twitter is half and half (you should have a personal and a professional account, adjust the privacy settings accordingly. You want your professional to appear more than your personal)LinkedIn is 100% professional, keep privacy settings open and keep it up to date and relevant




Bottom line, there is so much more to social media than just being social. Each platform is a hidden gem for your job search and we recommend you explore each to discover the professional side of social media to have an advantage over other candidates.

Written by Tom Weekes


Give a Little, Get a Little: Volunteering Matters

Wed, 11/13/2013 - 1:13pm


On top of doing your co-op, it’s always nice to have extra experience. What looks nearly as good as paid experience is unpaid volunteer experience. Why? Well there are a number of reasons and we’re going to dive right into them.
Work Ethic – Someone who is willing to take time out of their busy day to do free work has one heck of a work ethic. An employer is going to ask themselves, “Well if they are willing to do that without a paycheck, I wonder what kind of work they are willing to put out WITH a paycheck.” And that answer is usually, “A lot.” So you’re looking pretty good in the employer’s eyes.
Passion – Going off of work ethic, working for no money means that whatever you are volunteering for, you have some passion for. This could be a charity or good cause, just something in your field you do for free because you are driven, or something related to your hobbies. All of these things show that you care about something outside of work, and caring is the difference between a good worker and an average worker.
Easy Entry – The best part about volunteer work is that it is NOT competitive. Most of the time, you will have no problem finding volunteer work -- there is always room for good volunteers because not everyone is willing to make that commitment. It’s free, and easy to find, experience.
Extra Experience – The most basic reason, it’s just more experience. Even if it’s not directly related to your field you are getting experience working in teams, organizing, and overall life experience. Often there is a chance to take a leadership role. It’s something to add onto your resume besides an actual job (and that looks nice especially if you've only had a part-time job).
Character – Someone who is willing to work for free, especially if it's philanthropy work, is generally a good person. That doesn't mean if you don’t volunteer, you’re a bad person. It just means that if you volunteer you must have SOME level of integrity and an employer will assume you’re a responsible and mature individual.
Self-Actualization – Lastly this is 100% internal for you with a positive external outcome. People usually overlook this aspect, but volunteering makes you FEEL good. When you feel good, you tend to put out more work, are a happier and friendlier person, become more outgoing and gain the confidence you need in life.

Maslov's Hierarchy of Needs

Volunteering doesn't necessarily have to be with an organization; sometimes the company you work for has volunteer opportunities. This could be community services your company does OR it can just be an event that your company is hosting and needs people to help out off the clock. It’s good to just say yes to these opportunities if you can manage it. Check with your supervisors if there is ever an opportunity to volunteer within your organization.
You may be extremely busy during school, but if you find the right opportunity, you can fit it right into your schedule. A great time to volunteer is during the summer when you have more free time. Help your community and build your resume at the same time!

Volunteer Resources:

http://www.volunteermatch.org/
http://www.idealist.org/http://www.handsonnetwork.org/

Improvisation - Overcoming Fear While Building Your Presentation Skills

Wed, 11/06/2013 - 10:14am


Many people have stage fright – and we’re sure you've heard the statistic that public speaking is the top fear in the US above death. Some people are naturally comfortable with speaking in front of a crowd, going with the flow, getting out of their head, but some people are not… and that’s okay! There are many things that you can do to ease this anxiety, but one thing in particular is going to require you to really step out of your comfort zone.

Improvisational acting
Improvisation is one of the most terrifying barriers to cross, but there is a lot to learn and a lot of benefits from it. When you are giving a presentation or speaking to people at a meeting, in the office or just casually, you always have a purpose, a voice and tone. Improv functions similarly, except well, it’s not your own voice – you create someone else’s. In this case that "someone else" is just another facet of yourself - A confident version of yourself that can speak in front of people. Is this already mind-blowing? Well it's easier than it sounds. Let us explain...

Voice                                                                                                          PurposeAttitude                                                                                                       Audience
Posture                                                                                                       Content
Prop                                                                                                            Tone
Obsession
On the left are the building blocks for creating a character in improv, on the right are the building blocks for how you present yourself in every day speaking. Notice how similar they look? No? Let’s break it down even more.

Voice – Picking a specific voice (pitch, volume, accents, AKA a combination of tone and content)
Attitude – How your character comes across to other characters, their set of opinions (overall tone and audience)
Posture – How you physically look and your mannerisms
Prop – Things that are in the environment with you
Obsession – What does your character want, what do they need? (similar to purpose)

These are what makes up an improv character but also what makes up you in real life as well. Once you explore different combinations of these attributes, you begin to see the wide variety of character development possible, and in turn, personal development.


Benefits of using improv techniques

There are some benefits to improvisational acting skills that include…

1. Self confidence 
2. Public speaking skills

3. Getting out of your head and trusting your instincts (don’t think!)

4. Teamwork (you often perform in “troupes” that need a great deal of synergy)


Employers often like to hire people that can be quick on their feet and work in teams, it’s a huge resume builder
Things you can do to train yourself
There are some exercises you can do to learn these skills on your own without having to take a class. Improv (as well as all acting) requires you to be self-aware, and even just doing these exercises will improve your communication skills.

1. Character monologues – Stand in front of a mirror. Now pick a character, it can be anything from a Miss America contestant to a cowboy (it doesn't matter what gender you already are). Then you start talking. Try to figure out all of the VAPPO attributes as you talk, and figure out who this character is. Give them some detail, a name, where they live, a family, whatever you decide and talk about “yourself” (the character). You become really aware of your facial expressions, voice and purpose.

What you get out of this in real life:When you know who you are and what the point is you’re trying to get across, you suddenly realize how different you look and sound and how that comes across to your audience (and how it reflects of your own purpose). Be aware of this.

2. Rapid physical characters – This is a step up from character monologues, but focuses more on your body than your words. Stand in a room. Now look at a point in the room and be a character (focus more on physicality and voice rather than monologue/words). Now look at a new point and become a different character (dramatically change your posture). Now do this about 5 times, and then rapidly switch between each point in the room, switching between the characters.

What you get out of this in real life:Posture, posture, posture! Be aware of your body, how it moves and looks, and how it can change. Once you know how your body feels when moved in a certain way, you will always be aware of what you look like regardless if you can see yourself or not. Body language is extremely important in public speaking and just in everyday life.
3. Word association– Think of a word, ANY word. Now immediately say what that word makes you think of. Then do the same for that word. Example, you might start with fish, then say water, ocean, boat, cruise, summer, etc. Try to find a rhythm (follow a beat and say a word every 1 or 2 seconds so that way you don’t stop and think. The goal is to not think). Ultimately you want to get back to the first word without trying. It may take 20 seconds or it may take 3 minutes. It’s better to do this with a few people, but it works on your own as well.

What you get out of this in real life:Getting out of your head. Sometimes you may think too hard about something and work yourself to death. If you’re in an interview or meeting and you get thrown a question you weren’t expecting, you need to trust your instincts and internal knowledge and say what comes to mind. Being quick on your feet is a good quality to have. You soon realize how your subconscious works, and how you can trust it to inevitably accomplish your goal (in this case, going around full circle to come back to the original word).

Now go and learn some improvisational skills. There are plenty of opportunities to take a class, workshop or learn on your own. Our very own RIT campus has an improv club (RIT Improv) that has free workshops every Monday and Thursday from 8-10pm, so check them out!


Written by Tom Weekes

The Secret Agents of Job Hunting

Wed, 10/30/2013 - 10:23am


Spoiler: The secret agents of job hunting are search agents (yup, there's the pun). Many job hunting sites have ways to input very specific information and, in return, give you back very specific job openings at your convenience. A lot of people do not know this, however, so we’re going to take you through some examples of how to use it to make your job search less of a hassle.

LinkedIn

LinkedIn has its own built in job search system. It searches jobs that have been posted through LinkedIn (so if a company “posts” a job by just linking to their own company’s application page, it won’t show up).

Go to the jobs tab and click advanced search to put in your criteria.


Once you do that, click search and see all of the results. Nothing you like right now? At the top right is a button called “save search”, this allows you to get alerts from the search you just made, so click on it.


Now it opens up a menu that asks how often you want to receive alerts from this search, so if new jobs come up, you will get an email and notification. Simple as that! You can do this for as many searches as you want. Go back to this window and all of your saved searches will appear and you can edit them, delete them or add more.

Indeed.com

Indeed.com has even more search options than LinkedIn. Utilize both!
http://www.indeed.com/tools/jobseeker/



Some of these options include email alerts just like LinkedIn and even plug-ins that appear right on your browser when you're on the internet.

Job Zone

Last but definitely not least is our office’s very own Job Zone.


Schedule a search agent to run and "ping" you with new job postings! Using the search agent tool in Job Zone is one of the most effective ways for you learn about job opportunities, especially when looking for a co-op.




How To: Go to Jobs > select Advanced Search > check Save As check box > pick your criteria (the less you pick the better) > Submit. Now this search will show on Search Agent Tab under Jobs. Select your saved search and Schedule it to run.




Written by Tom Weekes

Luke Coy - Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Thu, 10/24/2013 - 12:33pm


Jessica VanGiesen - Georgetown, Kentucky

Thu, 10/24/2013 - 12:31pm


Allison Conte - Cincinnati, Ohio

Thu, 10/24/2013 - 12:29pm


Fall 2013 Co-op Newsletter

Thu, 10/24/2013 - 10:09am



Co-op Student Newsletter
Stay connected to RIT, while gaining experience

Fall 2013 Issue Topics:Co-op Factoids | Greetings From...Co-op Student Postcards | Make The Most Of Your Co-op| Returning To Semesters | Job Zone Tip: Uploading Transcripts | Things Going On Back Home | Decorating Your “Cube”


Fall Co-op Factoids
Number of students on co-op: 2,774  
Number of students on co-op internationally: 73
Number of companies employing co-op students: 1,573
Top 5 companies hiring the most students this quarter: Microsoft, General Electric - Aviation, Wegmans, BorgWarner Morse TEC, Advance TestingCo-op city trivia:   Two of our co-op students worked in Athens, Georgia last summer. Did you know that Athens is the home to “The Tree That Owns Itself”?  Legend has it that in the early 1800s, Professor William H. Jackson, out of love for a great oak tree on his property, deeded to the tree ownership of itself and the land within eight feet of it on all sides. The original tree fell in 1942, and a new tree was grown from one of its acorns. Its property rights have never been questioned. The tree even has its own Facebook page!



Greetings From – Co-op Student PostcardsWe want you to feel connected to your fellow classmates who are also away on co-op. Here are some of the fantastic places they are right now along with some tips and stories from them on how to make the best of your co-op![view full postcard]

[view full postcard]




[view full postcard]
Send us your own co-op greetings --share your experience! Email Gretchen at geboce@rit.eduif you are interested in being featured – include an engaging photo of you at work. Thanks!

Make The Most Of Your Co-opWe heard some great advice from our students, but we want to give you some tips of our own on what you should do to make sure your co-op an amazing experience and also how to benefit from it after it’s over. Some of you are just starting, some of you nearing the end. Rest assured, there are tips for all facets of co-op students. 1.  First, make a “co-op bucket list” It’s great to have an idea of what you want to accomplish at your co-op, even if you’re halfway through. These can be a combination of professional, social and personal goals. Maybe you’re in Philly and you want to try a real Philly cheesesteak, go swimming in the Atlantic, read War and Peace, see a Broadway show in NYC, ride a horse, or just plain ol’ getting caught up with Mad Men. Anything that YOU want to do! We encourage some professional things to, like reading a certain nonfiction book, learn a new skill, have a one-on-one lunch with your boss, etc.  Whatever you think can help you achieve success and happiness.
2. Make connections. Immediately when you start and before you leave, invite co-workers and supervisors to connect with you on LinkedIn, or other social media. Constantly network when you’re there. Those professional connections can help you later on.

3. Be social! You’re co-op will not be fun if you’re by yourself the whole time. Maybe you’re going on this co-op with a few RIT people, but maybe not so see if there is a Facebook co-op/intern group for that company, or if not, start one! Try getting other co-op students and interns together early on to hang out, go out to dinner, get to know each other. Before you leave, do the same thing. Your co-op experience is a thing to celebrate!

4. Explore the area. Get to know the culture of the city you are in. Even though you’re not from there, you might find some interest that you share with those from the city. Maybe you’re into gardening and the city you’re in had the nation’s biggest gardening expo… ANYTHING. There is bound to be something there for you. Think about attending events outside of work (and invite some work friends of course). Maybe choose a specific day of the week to just go around the city and explore with some friends. You can plan to go to events, or be spontaneous, whatever floats your boat.

5. Join groups/clubs. On top of just exploring what  that city has to offer, see what interest groups there are. You might find one through work, maybe a book club, film lovers, performing arts group, gamers, etc. This will give you something to look forward to outside of work and meet people with similar interests.

6. When you’re finished, make sure you’re actually finished. Don’t leave any loose strings. Make sure all of your projects are complete (in fact, some co-ops begin lightening your work load near the end of the co-op because they know you’ll be leaving soon) and you did them to the best of your ability. When you want your boss to write you a recommendation, you want them to remember that you did all of your work and didn’t drift off before you left. Then, make sure you say your goodbyes! Don’t just disappear one day (maybe you’re company is nice enough to have a goodbye party), so go around the office on your last day, make your rounds, hang out with your co-op friends one last time, and overall have a good time. Thank everyone for their support.

7. Lastly, fill out your report and get feedback from your supervisor.You need to fill out a co-op report every time you do one. It’s best to do it right before you’re done, so it’s still fresh in your mind. Then, make sure your supervisor fills out their work evaluation as well. Take time to sit down with them and maybe give you one-on-one feedback.  Constructive criticism is good and is a very professional gesture.

Returning To SemestersWe are in full swing of semesters here at RIT, but you all haven’t experienced it and when you come back you might feel like a fish out of water. Don’t worry, we thought of that. To ease any confusion or anxiety, we asked various students back home some questions to help you when you return from your co-op and to give you an idea of what semesters are like.
How do you like semesters so far?“Semesters are way better than I thought they were. I sort of expected RIT to spontaneously combust, but that has not happened. Nothing really feels different except for having more time between tests. But when week 10 hits I think I'll feel differently when I think classes should be over...”
“I like semesters, but, overall, I think quarters were better. I liked having the longer classes with the shorter quarter length”
“Honestly, I don’t think I will really be able to have a true opinion on semesters until we pass week 11.  I am an Industrial Design major so almost all of my classes are still 3 hours long, so it doesn’t really seem too different…yet.  “It is fine.  There have been no major issues I have noticed”
What’s the biggest difference you’ve noticed?“Classes started out a bit slower.  I didn’t have my first test until week 4, I know it would have been much sooner in quarters.  However, after the initial slow start things have picked up to what I think is a similar pace.”
“The biggest difference is the extra 5 weeks. It is strange not cramming in study time for midterms during week 5”
“Time between tests are longer. Nothing else feels different besides the whole 75 minute classes which is sort of weird.”“The biggest difference I’ve noticed is that teachers are giving more frequent smaller quizzes (about every 2 weeks), rather than more in depth, large tests.”
What’s one thing you had to get used to really quick?“Honestly, the hardest thing to get used to quickly has simply been saying ‘semesters’, rather than ‘quarters.’”“I had to get used to the number of classes. I usually only take 4 classes or 5 that are much shorter time periods. So I also had to get used to balancing my homework as well”“The shortness of the classes. It was strange only being in a class for 50 minutes as opposed to a hour and 50 minutes. Attendance is much less too because of these shorter class times. I think some students think they can miss a class without having to worry about falling behind like they did in the quarter system”
What’s one piece of advice you would give to students who are returning from a co-op in the spring?“Go over your class plan/ schedule for graduation.  A lot changed and I can take less classes in a year which means I learn more about a subject, but get to choose less subjects.  It really changed my 4/5 year plan so make sure you are still on track to graduate when you want. “
“Go to class, take the time to study, don't slack off. The semester system may seem like it is easier as it may actually be easier, but if you start to get comfortable with the slower pace, it might bite you in the butt later.”“It's just a quarter... and a half. Just roll with it!”
“Don’t worry too much.  RIT is the same school, you just have to change the way you describe the period of study, and might have some weird class times.  I would also advise to stay on top of your work and not get behind, just because there are 15 weeks instead of 10 does not mean there is extra time to fall behind.”
They most frequent statements students made were about:
1. Shorter class times
2. More spanned out testing
3. Different pacing
4. More classes
What advantage you do have over the students currently in semesters is that you will come back after professors had time to work out the kinks. Think of the current students as guinea pigs, if that helps! Don’t worry, you will ease in just fine.

Job Zone TipFirstly, we want to clear up a problem some students have been having adding an unofficial transcript document to Job Zone. How To Add Transcript to Job ZoneUnofficial Transcripts are available in SIS (Note: you may have to unblock pop ups in your browser, Chrome recommended)- Go to SIS 'Student Center'
- From 'other academic' drop down select 'Transcript: View Unofficial'
- From 'Report Type' drop down select 'Unofficial Academic Transcript' hit 'View Report' button
To avoid issues storing a transcript from SIS to Job Zone. Convert your SIS transcript to PDF first (this will avoid encryption in the PDF). We recommend Chrome as your browser - the print and save feature will give you a PDF without encryption. (Firefox does not have the same print and save feature)
1. View unofficial transcript in Chrome through SIS
2. In Chrome Right click and select Print, then click Change button and select SAVE as PDF using the Chrome pull-down options. (Note: Do not skip these steps and save the file. Also make sure you allow pop ups).
3. Upload to Job Zone 'Documents' (file size must be under 200kb)
This should solve any issue you’ve been having. Sorry for the inconvenience! Contact us if you have any questions. Now onto some awesome news

Things Going On Back HomeSteve Wozniak casually stopped by!
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RFWloj_39m8&feature=share&list=UUvsAa96EzubF7zNHJEzvG2g

Mud Tug 2013 was a success…
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WCfIwq920j4&feature=youtu.be

…and so was Humans vs. Zombies
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WMtxLQVzIYI&feature=c4-overview-vl&list=PLdPBsGyZIovOOflWGVdIbNVuviJYFYVhh

Brick City Homecoming
This past weekend was Brick City Homecoming Weekend! There were plenty of events going around campus. Thursday, Colin Mochrie and Brad Sherwood from the show “Whose Line is it Anyway?” came to campus to do a fun, interactive improv performance. Saturday, ABC’s “Shark Tank” investor, Daymond John, came to speak to students, put on by Saunders College of Business. Of course there was plenty of hockey, both RIT hockey teams played.


Fringe FestivalTwo weekends ago was the 2nd annual Rochester Fringe Festival, a showcase of all forms of art, specifically performance, all around the city. RIT had plenty (Over 20!) performances from various groups including Eight Beat Measure, Encore, RIT Players, Ukulele Club, RIT Poets, NTID Masquers and many more all performing in downtown Rochester. RIT Played a huge part in Fringe Fest thanks to the fantastic and dedicated student body!


Decorating Your “Cube”Some of you might have a nice, big office where it’s luxurious and private…
…the other 99% of you have small, cramped cubicles or are shoved behind a stack of printing paper and office supplies with no windows. It sounds bad, but we promise it can be better!
Try decorating your “cube”, as we will call it. Maybe you have heard of Feng Shui? If not, it’s the idea that the way you arrange you room can bring good into your life, such as happiness, luck, wealth, good health, etc. Now maybe you’re thinking, “Okay, putting my little desk cactus on the west side of my desk as opposed to the east side will NOT result in me getting a raise.” So you’re not a superstitious person, and that’s fine, BUT there is scientific evidence to prove that certain arrangements of your living space (when you work 40 hours a week, that’s considered a living space) leads to positive effects on your brain. When you’re in a positive mindset, you tend to be more outgoing, hardworking, friendlier, etc. and THOSE things lead to success. So decorating your work space might not directly cause good things, but it leads to it. SO, let’s get started on things you can do to make your work space more enjoyable during your co-op and to make you successful. Try some lucky bamboo!Make sure you follow your company’s standards first and foremost
1.       Bring some nature insideTry to buy a small plant that is low maintenance, such as ivy, or bamboo. Not only does having some greenery feel nice when you’re stuck inside all day, but plants literally suck in pollutants and give off oxygen, so they are naturally filtering the air. That way when your boss throws another project on your lap, you can take a deep breath of clean air.    


2.       Bring a piece of home to workMaybe this will motivate you...We’re going to call these “visual breaks”. When you spend so much time in your cube, it’s nice to personalize it in a way that reflects yourself. Put things in that remind you of home; things that will get your mind off of something stressful when you look at it and remind you of life outside of work (nothing too distracting though). Maybe a cork board to pin (appropriate) pictures of your family and friends or a good movie/TV show poster will do the trick. This might also spur some conversation with your coworkers once they can physically see the things you enjoy most. Talking to other employees instead of being alone all day definitely helps your attitude.  Maybe this image will motivate you...

3.       Lighting and temperatureLighting and temperature greatly affects your productivity. You can’t control the headache-inducing florescent lights beaming overhead; however focusing some light on other areas can reduce some of its annoyance. Maybe put a desk lamp, a dimmed lamp, colored lamp shades or even Christmas (string) lights in your cubicle. As far as temperature, if it gets too hot, bring a fan; if it gets too cold, bring a space heater (if allowed)    
4.       Use your own furnitureWho says you have to have the “standard” model of everything? Separating your workspace apart from others makes the whole experience seem unique, and you suddenly feel different. Try upgrading to a better, and comfier, chair. When you sit 7 hours a day, that chair makes a huge difference. Also consider desk accessories and extenders that make your desk more customized (even one that forces you to stand while you work, if you don’t like the idea of sitting all day)



5.       Lastly, HAVE FUNThere are so many ideas out there to make your cube extremely awesome. If you’re the creative type, look them up (Pinterest has some great stuff, http://www.pinterest.com/ConfettiStyle/cubicle-decor/). You may have lots of work to do, but taking some time out of your day (or staying extra/coming in early one day) to do this might be one of the best payoffs.
If you’re into the idea of Feng Shui, start with this very basic direction guide (http://fengshui.about.com/od/glossaryofterms/g/bagua.htm) and explore the rest of the site for almost every guide to Feng Shui.

Now go decorate and finish your co-op with style and happiness! 

Fall 2013 Student Newsletter

Thu, 10/24/2013 - 9:57am


Job Zone E-News Fall 2013TOPICS:  Job Zone Issue| Career Fair Debrief  | #GetLinked Campaign - NEW | Meet Ups – NEW | Digital Dirt - NEW | Upcoming Events | Connect with us on Social Media

Job Zone Tip: Transcript Issue

Firstly, we want to clear up a problem some students have been having with storing a transcript from SIS (PeopleSoft) to Job Zone.

Convert your SIS transcript to PDF first (this will avoid encryption in the PDF). We recommend Chrome as your browser – the print and save feature will give you a PDF without encryption. (Firefox does not have the same print and save feature)1.       View unofficial transcript in Chrome through SIS (PeopleSoft)2.       In Chrome Right click and select Print, then click Change button and  select SAVE as PDF using the Chrome pull-down options. (Note: Do not skip these steps and save the file. Also make sure you allow pop ups). 3.       Upload this file to Job ZoneThis should solve any issue you’ve been having. Sorry for the inconvenience! Now onto some awesome news

Career Fair Debrief

So guess what everyone? You all broke our Career Fair record! We had 3862 attendees (students and alumni) and 756 recruiters (that we know of) representing 250 companies and nearly 1600 interviews conducted.

We wanted to take a second to thank everyone who came, our fantastic staff, all recruiters who participated and most importantly our student volunteers. Without them, none of this would have been possible, all 200 of them. This includes volunteers, Student Ambassadors, student panelists, the Women’s Rugby Team, our “Wireless Wizards” and many more groups of students who in any way helped us.


They were sporting the grey and orange volunteer shirts, helping set up, clean up and assist the staff and recruiters during the event.
Make sure you come back for the Spring Career Fair!

#GetLinked Campaign - NEW

Get Linked, Win Prizes!
You may have seen the campaign check list during the LinkedIn photo booth at the Career Fair, so let us elaborate on that. LinkedIn is becoming one of the most prominent platforms for connecting people with jobs, and in the upcoming year it will be a necessity. Start building up your LinkedIn profile and online presence NOW. To get you motivated, we have created the #GetLinked Campaign designed to give you a taste of what LinkedIn has at its disposal. Even better, the campaign ends with a RAFFLE to win a FREE prize. Starting TODAY! The prizes may include an iPod shuffle or RIT gear (fleece sweatshirt, hoodie, etc.) You will be able to choose if you win.
Raffle check list: Join the RIT Office of Career Services group on LinkedIn (mandatory) AND…Do 5 of the following 8 things:1.      Connect with 10 new people2.      Add a new section to your profile (with content)3.      Customize your URL4.      Join a new group relating to  your field/interests (aside from our group)5.      Post 2 articles through your account relating to your field/interests6.      Add 5 new skills that people can endorse you7.      Post a discussion in a group8.      Update your profile picture to a professional-looking headshotWhen you are done, comment in the manager’s choice Get Linked discussion on LinkedIn saying that you completed the tasks.
Easy enough, right? Doing these will only take 10 minutes of your time at most, but the impact is exponential. We can’t see if you’ve done these things unless you join our group (if you haven’t already) and open your privacy settings, so make sure that’s your first priority! We encourage you to try and do the things you haven’t already completed prior to the campaign, but if you’ve already completed some of these tasks, they DO count towards the check list.
This is a fantastic start to any job search; you’ll thank yourself in the near future. Also…
Make sure you follow us on Twitter @RITCareers and look for #GetLinked for updates and announcements. Handouts will be given out during surrounding events.

The campaign is active from 10/2 (Today) – 10/9. We will be drawing and announcing winners and prizes early on Wednesday, 10/9

MEET UPS - NEW

Something new we are trying this year are “Meet Ups”

Instead of the generic workshop with a presentation and then a Q&A session, we are skipping right to the Q&A so we can get to what YOU want to talk about when YOU want it.
Every session will be hosted by several career services experts. You can come and ask us anything about careers, how we can help you, how to find co-ops or full-time jobs, targeting your job search, sharpening interview skills, negotiating salaries, networking, and the list goes on forever.
Hosts:

Manny Contomanolis






Dr. Manny Contomanolis, Associate VP and Director


 Louise CarreseLouise Carrese, Sr. Associate Director for Employer Relations


 Michelle MageeMichelle Magee, Associate Director for Student Services

Maria RichartMaria Richart, Associate Director for International Outreach
When and Where:Thursday, November 7th, 12 – 1pmThursday, November 21st, 12 – 1pmThursday, December 5th, 12 – 1pmThursday, December 11th, 12 – 1pm
Campus Center Reading Room (Upstairs from the clubs office)

DIGITAL DIRT - NEW



We all use social media, probably even daily… maybe hourly? Well everything you do on social media stays there and everyone sees it, including employers… 91% of them to be exact. We will start Digital Dirt events this semester where we expose you to what employers see when they look at your online presence. We will give you recommendations on how to clean up your accounts. No appointment needed! Look for our booth and stop by for a quick assessment.
Tuesday, October 8th, 12 – 1pmSAU Lobby
Friday, October 18th, 1 – 2pmCrossroads
Wednesday, October 23rd, 10 – 11amWriting Center – Library
Wednesday, November 13th, 6 – 7pmGrace Watson Hall
Thursdays, December 12th, 4 – 5pmGrace Watson Hall
Remember… Like Vegas, what happens on the internet, stays on the internet.

OTHER EVENTS
[for a complete list, visit http://www.rit.edu/careerevents]

Fairs
Graduate School Fair
Wednesday, October 23rd, 11am – 1pm
Fireside LoungeCareer ExplorationThinking of Changing Your Major?A 4-part info-session to help you assess alternate majors at RIT (Attendance of all 4 parts is mandatory) Mondays, 4 – 5pm, October 7th, October 14thand October 21st Bausch and Lomb Center - Room A100
ORWednesdays, 4 – 5pm, October 30th, November 6th, November 13th and November 20th Bausch & Lomb Center Room A190
Graduate School: To Go or Not to Go? Learn about the process of selecting a grad program and university that’s right for you, which can be very overwhelming Friday, October 18th 3 – 4pm Bausch & Lomb Center Room – A100
Chart Your Career PathLearn how to gather the proper information about what occupation is right for you with your major and your optionsThursday, November 7th, 4 – 5pm Bausch & Lomb Center – Room A190
Job Search EssentialsMentoring: Your Key to SuccessLearn how mentors can help you jumpstart and advance your career or job searchThursday, October 17th, 12 – 1:30pmGCCIS – Room 2400
Building a Better Technical ResumePresented by Thomas McCarthy, Recruiter for Modis. Learn valuable tips on developing a technical resume from a recruiterFriday, November 15th, 2 – 3pmBausch & Lomb Center – Room A100
Work AbroadWork Abroad Info SessionWorking abroad is a very exciting and rewarding experience, but there is a lot to learn and preparation Tuesday, October 22nd, 4 – 5pmBausch & Lomb Center – Room A100ORFriday, November 8th, 12 – 1:30pm Bausch & Lomb Center – Room A190
Job Search for Graduate StudentsUsing Social Media for Your Job SearchThursday, October 10th, 1 – 1:50pmCarlson Auditorium – Room 1125
How to Write a CVThursday, November 14th, 2 – 2:50pm
Effective Job Search StrategiesMonday, December 9th, 3 – 3:50pmCarlson Auditorium – Room 1125

Connect With Us On Social Media

In the Office of Cooperative Education and Career Services, we strive to provide effective and personalized career education. One way we do that is by connecting with students, alumni, employers and community partners in their own language and on their own timeframe – through social media! We use social media to share information and events, create conversation and interchange, and respond to questions and feedback! We want to be the platform for employers to connect to YOU, and you all to connect to each other and our office. Visit our official accounts and join the exchange! Links to all of our social media sites can be found on our home page, http://www.rit.edu/emcs/oce/
We’re on TwitterCo-op & Career Services uses Twitter to share the latest information, pictures, and resources throughout the day and during career events. We frequently feature advice, articles, employer visits, key dates, live tweeting of events and sometimes even giveaways. We like to converse with students and alumni by answering questions and tweeting back. Twitter is the most personal of all our accounts, so it’s the best to get primary information from us and directly connect to employers. Follow our account, @RITCareers
We Have an Interest in PinterestFood, art, fashion – and now career inspiration. Co-op & Career Services has joined Pinterest. Discover the latest advice on interview attire, resume writing, and words of encouragement like this: “If you can dream it, you can do it.” These words from Walt Disney are enough to get me through interviews! Find the latest career tips by following and repinning our boards, http://pinterest.com/ritcareerserv




Don’t Be Left Out: Become LinkedInLinkedIn is a professional networking site that allows you to connect with like-minded professionals, groups, and discussions. Networking is a key component of job and co-op searches; so begin now. Connect with Co-op and Career Service’s LinkedIn group, along with over 3,000 students, alumni, and employers! We have up-to-date job postings and discussions waiting for you. Visit http://www.linkedin.com/groups?home=&gid=4577501&trk=anet_ug_hm



Become a part of our timelineWe like you, will you like us on Facebook? Find the latest information about Co-op & Career Services events. We welcome shares, likes, comments, any engagement from you! Connect with our Co-op & Career Services Facebook page, https://www.facebook.com/RITCareerServices





Be our “You” in “Youtube”
RIT’s Co-op & Career Services’ Career Channel provides relevant and engaging videos on job search strategies, career fair, interview tips, and much more. Videos feature our staff, co-op students, alumni, recruiters, and employers. You should view our videos and improve your skills! Visit www.youtube.com/user/RITCoopCareer   

Decorating Your “Cube”

Fri, 10/18/2013 - 1:30pm
Some of you might have a nice, big office where it’s luxurious and private…
…the other 99% of you have small, cramped cubicles or are shoved behind a stack of printing paper and office supplies with no windows. It sounds bad, but we promise it can be better!
Try decorating your “cube”, as we will call it. Maybe you have heard of Feng Shui? If not, it’s the idea that the way you arrange you room can bring good into your life, such as happiness, luck, wealth, good health, etc. Now maybe you’re thinking, “Okay, putting my little desk cactus on the west side of my desk as opposed to the east side will NOT result in me getting a raise.” So you’re not a superstitious person, and that’s fine, BUT there is scientific evidence to prove that certain arrangements of your living space (when you work 40 hours a week, that’s considered a living space) leads to positive effects on your brain. When you’re in a positive mindset, you tend to be more outgoing, hardworking, friendlier, etc. and THOSE things lead to success. So decorating your work space might not directly cause good things, but it leads to it. SO, let’s get started on things you can do to make your work space more enjoyable during your co-op and to make you successful. Make sure you follow your company’s standards first and foremost
1.       Bring some nature insideTry to buy a small plant that is low maintenance, such as ivy, or bamboo. Not only does having some greenery feel nice when you’re stuck inside all day, but plants literally suck in pollutants and give off oxygen, so they are naturally filtering the air. That way when your boss throws another project on your lap, you can take a deep breath of clean air.    

2.       Bring a piece of home to work

We’re going to call these “visual breaks”. When you spend so much time in your cube, it’s nice to personalize it in a way that reflects yourself. Put things in that remind you of home; things that will get your mind off of something stressful when you look at it and remind you of life outside of work (nothing too distracting though). Maybe a cork board to pin (appropriate) pictures of your family and friends or a good movie/TV show poster will do the trick. This might also spur some conversation with your coworkers once they can physically see the things you enjoy most. Talking to other employees instead of being alone all day definitely helps your attitude.  

Maybe this poster will motivate you...
3.       Lighting and temperatureLighting and temperature greatly affects your productivity. You can’t control the headache-inducing florescent lights beaming overhead; however focusing some light on other areas can reduce some of its annoyance. Maybe put a desk lamp, a dimmed lamp, colored lamp shades or even Christmas (string) lights in your cubicle. As far as temperature, if it gets too hot, bring a fan; if it gets too cold, bring a space heater (if allowed)    
4.       Use your own furnitureWho says you have to have the “standard” model of everything? Separating your workspace apart from others makes the whole experience seem unique, and you suddenly feel different. Try upgrading to a better, and comfier, chair. When you sit 7 hours a day, that chair makes a huge difference. Also consider desk accessories and extenders that make your desk more customized (even one that forces you to stand while you work, if you don’t like the idea of sitting all day)

5.       Lastly, HAVE FUNThere are so many ideas out there to make your cube extremely awesome. If you’re the creative type, look them up (Pinterest has some great stuff, http://www.pinterest.com/ConfettiStyle/cubicle-decor/). You may have lots of work to do, but taking some time out of your day (or staying extra/coming in early one day) to do this might be one of the best payoffs.
If you’re into the idea of Feng Shui, start with this very basic direction guide (http://fengshui.about.com/od/glossaryofterms/g/bagua.htm) and explore the rest of the site for almost every guide to Feng Shui.
Now go decorate and finish your co-op with style and happiness! 

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