Sponsored Research

GIS Faculty Sponsored Research

GIS faculty undertake a wide range of research projects relating to sustainability and the environment for federal, state and corporate sponsors, including the National Science Foundation, U.S. Department of Commerce, U.S. Department of Defense, U.S. Department of Energy, U.S. Department of Transportation, the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority, the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation, and Eastman Kodak Company. Funding for GIS faculty projects totals between $2.5M and $3M annually.

Recently awarded sponsored research projects conducted by GIS faculty include:

Energy

Genetic Algorithm Modeling of Electricity Infrastructure Dynamics Under Uncertainty

  • PI: Dr. Eric Williams. Co-PI: Dr, Eric Hittinger
  • Start & Finish dates: 9/1/2014-8/30/2017
  • Sponsor: National Science Foundation
  • Award Amount: $309,660
  • Brief Summary: The proposed research builds an optimization model that simulates the evolution of electricity infrastructure in the United States. The model uses a genetic algorithm to find "lowest" cost options while satisfying demand and RPS constraints. Uncertainty is inherent in the model, variability in outcomes are Monte Carlo distributions based on uncertainty in input variables. Historical patterns are carefully analyzed and combined with judgment of trends to develop input distributions. The resulting grid build-outs are evaluated in terms of the dynamical evolution of environmental performance (e.g. grams of C02/kWh), economics (e.g. levelized cost of electricity) and public investment in subsidy programs.

Direct Catalytic Conversion Of Renewable Fuels

  • PI: Dr. Thomas Trabold. Co-PI: Mark Walluk
  • Start & Finish dates: 6/30/2014-4/30/2015
  • Sponsors: NYSERDA, Novorocs Technologies LLC
  • Award Amount: $25,000
  • Brief Summary: GIS proposes to support Novorocs Technologies LLC (Novorocs), a joint venture created between Solid Cell Inc. and Boreskov Institute of Catalysis, in the development of their state-of-the-art "Low Cost Catalyst for Syngas Production". Work would be performed consistent with NYSERDA PON 2569, Advanced Clean Power Technologies. GIS will conduct performance and durability testing along with design analysis of the device for production, and will provide Novorocs with a report summarizing the results of this work. The scope of work herein has been modified to accommodate changes in the tasks, as directed by Novorocs, since the initial proposal submittal..

Improved Carbon Nanotube Wire Conductivity

  • PI: Dr. Brian Landi
  • Start & Finish dates: 3/16/2014-3/15/2016
  • Sponsors: National Reconnaissance Office, Office of the Chief of Naval Research
  • Award Amount: $389,281
  • Brief Summary: RIT, in conjunction with the U.S. Naval Research Labs (NRL), will continue technology insertion studies to determine potential use of carbon nanotube materials for maritime applications. RIT will also continue to further investigate novel nanotechnologies for properties exploitable for multi-functional hybrid CNT wires designs with other nanomaterials in concert (e.g. nanometals, non-semiconductors, graphene, etc.) to improve bulk conductivity.

Flexible Load Control for Peak Demand Reduction

  • PI: Dr. Nenad Nenadic
  • Start & Finish dates: 1/23/2014-4/30/2014
  • Sponsors: High Tech Rochester, New York State Energy Research & Development Authority
  • Award Amount: $50,000
  • Brief Summary: During Phase 1, the GIS Peak Demand Reduction team will attend the NEXUS-NY Lean Start-up training and be mentored by a NEXUS-NY provided mentor in an effort to advance the initial stages of research in utilizing a controller to reduce peak demand. The goal of Phase 1 is to identify the market size and needs for the system, including potential alternate markets and technologies (called a technology pivot) in an effort to develop a minimally viable product and receive feedback on the product. This will prepare the product for a further revision of the technology and development of a business strategy and plan that can be presented to investors during Phase 2 of the program. During Phase 2, the prototype will be further refined closer to a production solution, a detailed business plan will be developed, an IP review will be performed, and an Investor Due Diligence Report will be prepared.

CNT High Energy Storage System (CHESS)

  • PI: Dr. Brian Landi
  • Start & Finish dates: 10/1/2013-9/30/2016
  • Sponsor: National Reconnaissance Office
  • Award Amount: $360,179
  • Brief Summary: This project focuses on high capacity loading of the anode/cathode composites, alternative current collector development and Stabilized Lithium Metal Powder (SLMP) lithiation to maximize capacity and rate capability while minimizing Solid-Electrolyte-Interphase (SEI) Loss. In addition, students to investigate high capacity cathode active materials and postmortem analysis to understand battery degradation mechanisms and battery safety will be pursued. The safety of carbon nanotubes (CNT)-additive based electrodes for cathode composites using Nickel Cobalt Aluminum (NCA) active materials will also be investigated. Postmortem analysis will be used to determine the effects of overcharge and cycling through characterization techniques such as differential scanning calorimetry measurements and scanning electron microscope (SEM) microscopy.

Chromatographic Separation of Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes with Advanced Chirality Enrichment Assessment for Electrodes and Devices

  • PI: Dr. Brian Landi. Co-PI: Ivan Puchades
  • Start & Finish dates: 7/1/2013-6/30/2016
  • Sponsor: Central Intelligence Agency
  • Award Amount: $359,957
  • Brief Summary: This program involves the development of a scalable column chromatography process to universally separate single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) based on electronic-type, diameter, and chirality. The effort will utilize as-produced SWCNT materials from varying synthetic techniques (and different diameter distributions), which have been uniquely established at RIT and from commercial sources. A combination of analytical techniques, including optical absorbance, fluorescence, and TGA, will be used to monitor the separation efficacy. Additionally, a method will be established to quantify enrichment in the electronic-type-separated SWCNTs and change in SWCNT purity. Chemical processing of the separated samples using acid and thermal oxidation steps will be employed to remove the residual surfactants. The resulting purified, separated SWCNTs will be analyzed by temperature dependent conductivity and susceptibility to chemical doping. An assessment of the intrinsic SWCNT properties will provide the necessary understanding required for inserting advanced materials into applications involving electrodes and nanoelectronic devices.

Micro Hydropower Test

  • PI: Dr. Gabrielle Gaustad
  • Start & Finish dates: 8/26/2013-8/26/2014
  • Sponsor: Environmental Protection Agency
  • Award Amount: $14,999
  • Brief Summary: The proposed research will study the feasibility of micro-hydropower implementation and provide the quantitative data and design necessary to implement a micro-hydropower system within the Rochester Institute of Technology's new Golisano Institute for Sustainability (GIS) building. This work will test a micro-hydropower unit in the lab, use data from these tests to determine an efficient implementation design, and quantify the economic and environmental impacts from such implementation. Phase II would then integrate the unit into the current rainwater collection and storage infrastructure present in the new GIS building.

Fuel Cell for Residential Power Applications: Fuel Reformer & Stack Integration

  • PI: Dr. Thomas Trabold
  • Start & Finish dates: 9/1/2013-8/31/2014
  • Sponsor: National Institute for Standards and Technology
  • Award Amount: $86,076
  • Brief Summary: The proposed research program aims to ultimately develop an integrated fuel reformer and fuel cell system that can provide a reliable, cost-effective system for residential power applications. The proposed research program extends earlier work on propane fuel reforming to incorporate an electrochemical solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC), to produce up to 500W electrical power. If successfully executed, this ongoing work will support further research and development in fuel cell system performance evaluation, and ultimately an integrated fuel reformer/fuel cell stack device that is commercially viable.

Epitaxial Wafer Supply

  • PI: Dr. David Forbes.
  • Start & Finish dates: 8/1/2013-8/31/2013
  • Sponsor: University of Central Florida
  • Award Amount: $3,500
  • Brief Summary: Rochester Institute of Technology will provide University of Central Florida with epitaxial wafers for use in an undergraduate student microfabrication course. The wafer structures will consist of LED and photodetector structures following published, non-proprietary epitaxial structures.

End-of-Life Material Flows From Emerging Lithium-Ion Battery Systems

  • PI: Dr. Callie W. Babbitt.
  • Start & Finish dates: 7/1/2013-6/30/2018
  • Sponsor: National Science Foundation
  • Award Amount: $400,355
  • Brief Summary: This project will apply scenario analysis and novel industrial ecology models to quantify and characterize projected end-of-life (EOL) flows and attendant resource implications associated with ongoing lithium-ion battery adoption. This rapidly evolving battery technology is a promising energy storage solution for future deployment of electric vehicles. However, the technology's potential environmental tradeoffs are not fully characterized. While recent work has focused on supply side concerns, such as lithium availability, key uncertainties surround the emergence and management of these batteries in the waste stream and the ability of existing recycling infrastructure to recover scarce and valuable materials from a highly variable mix of end-of-life batteries. The approach and industrial ecology models applied here provide insight to EOL batteries, but are translatable to other sectors at early stages of technological development (e.g., renewable energy systems).

Quantum Dot and Doping Superlattice (nipi) Photovoltaic Devices

  • PI: Dr. Brian Landi
  • Start & Finish dates: 5/1/2013-4/30/2014
  • Sponsors: Air Force Materiel Command, University of Toledo
  • Award Amount: $213,321
  • Brief Summary: The focus of this research program is to evaluate the electrical and mechanical properties of carbon nanotube (CNT) mixed metal composites (MMe). Specifically, deposition of CNTs onto a metal patterned semiconductor wafer will allow for comparison of device structure performance. Comparison of different CNT deposition strategies will include film transfer and spin coating. The physical and electrical properties of customized samples fabricated at RIT will be analyzed before and after mechanical stressing. In addition, thermal cycling will be performed to assess stability in application environments. Modification of CNT materials to enhance the interfacial strength within the MMC will involve surface treatments to foster improved metal adhesion. The use of traditional evaporation compared to electroplating will be considered to overcoat the CNT deposited layers. Ultimately, this research will lead to a rational assessment of CNT-based MMC for advanced solar cell adoption.

Improved Carbon Nanotube Wire Conductivity

  • PI: Dr. Brian Landi
  • Start & Finish dates: 4/1/2013-3/31/2014
  • Sponsors: National Reconnaissance Office, Office of the Chief of Naval Research
  • Award Amount: $389,281
  • Brief Summary: RIT in conjunction with the US Naval Research Labs (NRL) will conduct technology insertion studies to determine potential use of carbon nanotube materials for maritime applications. RIT will also continue to further investigate novel nanotechnologies for properties exploitable for multi-functional materials. Investigations shall include enhancing the bulk conductivity of carbon nanotube (CNT) wires and evaluating hybrid CNT wires designs with other nanomaterials in concert (e.g. nanometals, nano-semiconductors, graphene, etc.) to improve bulk conductivity.

Methane Production Potential of Organic Feedstocks for Anaerobic Co-Digestion in Seneca County, NY

  • PI: Dr. Thomas Trabold. Co-PI: Dr. Anahita Williamson
  • Start & Finish dates: 2/1/2013-6/30/2013
  • Sponsors: Seneca BioEnergy LLC, New York State Department of Environmental Conservation
  • Award Amount: $81,000
  • Brief Summary: NYSP2I proposes to conduct an evaluation of the methane producing potential of combined livestock manure and food waste resources in the region around Seneca County, New York. The proposed project will focus on locally available waste streams that have not been extensively investigated in previous and current research programs, but also have the potential for use as sustainable energy resources via anaerobic co-digestion (ACD), whereby manure and food wastes are combined to enhance biogas production rate and methane concentration. The waste materials to be studied in the proposed project would potentially be available for an ACD facility being considered by Seneca BioEnergy for their 55-acre site at the location of the former Seneca Army Depot in Romulus, NY.

Fuel Reforming for Residential Power Applications

  • PI: Dr. Thomas Trabold
  • Start & Finish dates: 9/1/2012-8/31/2013
  • Sponsor: National Institute for Standards and Technology
  • Award Amount: $84,942
  • Brief Summary: The proposed research program aims to ultimately develop an integrated fuel reformer and fuel cell system that can provide a reliable, cost-effective system for residential power applications. A logical first step in this program is to design and assess processes for reforming readily available propane fuel into a hydrogen-rich reformate stream to be delivered to the fuel cell stack. If successfully executed, this initial work will support further research and development in fuel cell performance evaluation, and ultimately fuel reformer and fuel cell stack subsystem integration.

Assessment of Used Lithium Ion Batteries for Less-Demanding, Secondary Applications

  • PI: Dr. Nenad Nenadic.
  • Start & Finish dates: 12/1/2012-5/31/2013
  • Sponsor: New York State Department of Environmental Conservation
  • Award Amount: N/A
  • Brief Summary: This study address obstacles that prevent reuse of lithium ion batteries. Better cell replacement strategies will benefit existing New York State battery integrators; e.g. Ultralife Inc., for maintenance of large modules and packs. Repurposing of used cells for less demanding applications is new, and has the potential to be developed into new NYS businesses. Assessment of cells with unknown history can be further developed at NYBEST's testing facility in Eastman Business Park as a certification process for less demanding applications; which, if successful, can be spun into a new company. Moreover, access to inexpensive grid storage can accelerate deployment of NYS microgrids, which in turn, will greatly increase reliability and resilience of the main grid, making it far less susceptible to failure due to blackouts and natural disasters.

High Efficiency, Lattice-Matched Solar Cells Using Epitaxial Lift-Off

  • PI: Dr. David Forbes. Co-PIs: Dr. Seth Hubbard
  • Start & Finish dates: 10/1/2012-9/30/2015
  • Sponsors: Department of Defense, Microlink Devices, Inc.
  • Award Amount: $945,861
  • Brief Summary: MicroLink Devices, Rochester Institute of Technology (RIT) and the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) propose to develop a novel, high-efficiency all-lattice-matched solar cell which can achieve much higher power conversion efficiency and thereby enable a far lower levelized cost of energy than is possible with current concentrator photovoltaic (CPV) technologies. This will be accomplished with a triple-junction InAlAsSb/InGaAsP/InGaAs cell lattice-matched to InP. With the inclusion of strain-balanced quantum well layers in the bottom subcell, this structure has a subcell bandgap combination with the realistic potential to achieve a power conversion efficiency greater than 50% under AM1.5D illumination at 500X concentration. The wide band-gap, InAIAsSb top-junction is a novel solar cell material and is the key enabling technology for this proposal. It is the unique expertise and capability of the assembled team for growth of mixed group-V and Sb-containing materials that will enable the attainment of this novel technology. Two of the proposing team members are co-inventors on a provisional patent of this solar cell technology.

Multijunction Solar Cells Lattice-Matched to InP - A Path to High-Efficiency Flexible Photovoltaics

  • PI: Dr. David Forbes.
  • Start & Finish dates: 9/10/2012-9/10/2015
  • Sponsor: Office of the Chief of Naval Research
  • Award Amount: $299,288
  • Brief Summary: This project will focus on the epitaxial material development of the novel materials within the triple junction solar cell. The low-bandgap cell will be epitaxial strain-compensated InGaAs/InGaAs quantum well/barrier structures (Eg ~ 0.6-0.9eV). Quantum wells (QW) have shown to improve radiation hardness for space applications and is applied here specifically for space power applications via solar cell implementation. Through detailed optimization of band offsets, indium composition, strain-balancing, and interface quality, the effective bandgap of the bottom cell can be engineered to reach 0.7 eV. Examining the relationships between these fundamental material characteristics will guide the design of a 0.70 eV QW solar cell. The wide-bandgap sub-cell material is InA1AsSb which requires research to develop the material quality to be suitable for multi-junction InP solar cells. Ultimately, a path will be illustrated where in these materials and processes can be integrated with established epitaxial liftoff (ELO) technology to produce a thin, high specific power density (W/m3), and flexible solar cell.

Characterization of Non-Aqueous Food Wastes as Feedstock for Sustainable Energy Production

  • PI: Dr. Thomas Trabold.
  • Start & Finish dates: 9/1/2012-2/28/2013
  • Sponsors: U.S. Economic Development Administration, RIT
  • Award Amount: $38,774
  • Brief Summary: RIT's Golisano Institute for Sustainability proposes to conduct a comprehensive characterization of non-aqueous food waste resources in the 9-County area of New York State covered by the Department of Commerce Jobs Accelerator program. This work builds upon prior research conducted as part of the Lean, Energy and Environment (LE2) program of the New York State Pollution Prevention Institute (NYSP2I), which revealed the large quantities of food waste available in New York State, particularly in the Upstate corridor extending from Buffalo to Syracuse. The proposed program will focus on non-aqueous waste streams that have not been extensively investigated in previous and current research programs, but also have the potential for use as sustainable energy resources via chemical conversion processes including anaerobic digestion, fermentation and transesterification.

Radiation Hard Quantum Well Multijunction Solar Cells

  • PI: Dr. David Forbes. Co-PI: Dr. Seth Hubbard
  • Start & Finish dates: 8/31/2012-7/31/2014
  • Sponsors: Missile Defense Agency, CFD Research Corporation.
  • Award Amount: $307,535
  • Brief Summary: This project will support CFDRC by design, epitaxial growth, fabrication and testing of both standard and quantum well enhanced photovoltaic devices. The effort will concentrate on the design and demonstration of QW-enhanced middle cell having enhanced photovoltaic efficiency and radiation tolerance. The development of the middle cell technology by RIT will be subsequently transferred to a commercial epitaxial growth vendor to be incorporated into a triple-junction solar cell.

Brewery and Distillery Waste Reduction by Anaerobic Digestion

  • PI: Dr. Thomas Trabold.
  • Start & Finish dates: 8/1/2012-3/31/2013
  • Sponsors: New York State Department of Environmental Conservation, RIT
  • Award Amount: $41,921
  • Brief Summary:The New York State Pollution Prevention Institute (NYSP2I) at Rochester Institute of Technology (RIT) proposes, in partnership with Thomas Trabold of RIT's Golisano Institute for Sustainability (GIS) and Ron Spinelli of VCIM, to assess the potential for reducing organic waste volumes associated with brewery and distillery operations in the Brooklyn, New York area. These wastes currently represent a significant fraction of these company's operating expenses due the significant transport and disposal charges involved. Through application of anaerobic digester technology, it may be possible to decompose these wastes in the absence of oxygen to produce useful biogas, comprised largely of methane (CH4). The biogas could provide additional economic and environmental benefits by offsetting existing natural gas demand. This work builds upon prior activities conducted as part of the Lean, Energy and Environment (LE2) program, which has revealed the large quantities of food waste available in New York State, particularly in the Upstate corridor extending from Buffalo to Syracuse and in the New York City region.

Carbon Nanotube High Energy Storage System

  • PI: Dr. Brian Landi
  • Start & Finish dates: 6/1/2012-9/30/2013
  • Sponsor: National Reconnaissance Office
  • Award Amount: $300,173
  • Brief Summary: The purpose and ultimate goal of this project shall focus on the fundamental development and testing of a300 Wh/kg CNT-based battery. The ability to utilize carbon nanotubes as part of the anode as additives and/or current collectors in concert with materials such as silicon and germanium, allows for a 2X increase overt today's current battery energy density. Specifically, the program developments will lead to fabrication of such cells using CNT electrodes with enhanced performance. It is expected that suitable electrode designs will maximize battery energy and power density while preserving cycle performance.

Alternative Fuel Designation Petition Analysis Support

  • PI: Dr. Michael Thurston. Co-PI: Brian Hilton
  • Start & Finish dates: 4/13/2012-4/12/2014
  • Sponsor: National Renewable Energy Laboratory
  • Award Amount: $19,957
  • Brief Summary: The objective of this effort is to assist NREL in meeting project milestones and objectives, which entails analysis of proposed and enacted changes to the SFP program. The focus of analysis and evaluation will be on the alternative fuel designation petitions to DOE, which seek designation of a fuel as an alternative fuel for purposes of DOE's Alternative Fuel Transportation Program. This task may include developing draft guidance to help petitioners understand and adhere to alternative fuel designation petition criteria and requirements. Meeting these milestones and objectives is an important element in support of NREL's mission to advance the state-of-the-art and to facilitate the use of alternative fuels and alternative fueled vehicles.

Ultra High Energy Density Cathodes with Carbon Nanotubes

  • PI: Dr. Brian Landi. Co-PI: Reginald Rogers
  • Start & Finish dates: 4/1/2012-3/31/2013
  • Sponsor: Air Force Materiel Command
  • Award Amount: $99,994
  • Brief Summary: Free-standing carbon nanotube (CNT) electrodes offer the potential for a lightweight, conductive structure to effectively support ultra-high energy density cathodes like Li2MnO3 and LiMO2 (where M is a transition metal) hybrids for lithium ion batteries. This research will investigate (1) CNTs as additives to enhance the thickness of composite coatings, (2) the synthesis and characterization of Li-rich layered metal oxides to increase the capacity and energy density of the cathode, and (3) the combination of a free-standing CNT paper with a Li-rich layered metal oxide cathode to create an ultra high energy density electrode. A systematic analysis will be performed using electrochemical characterization (capacity, rate capability, and impedance spectroscopy) as well as materials analysis using electrical conductivity, microscopy, and diffraction techniques to ascertain (1) the effectiveness of SWCNT as an additive and (2) the proper combination of the Li-rich layered metal oxide material with a CNT electrode matrix such that efficient electron and ion transport are achieved.

Connectorization of Carbon Nanotube Coaxial Cables

  • PI: Dr. Brian Landi
  • Start & Finish dates: 3/1/2012-11/30/2012
  • Sponsors: National Reconnaissance Office, Tyco Electronics Ltd.
  • Award Amount: $199,950
  • Brief Summary: It has recently been shown that carbon nanotube (CNT) materials can be successfully implemented into coaxial cable designs which represent a disruptive technology for future aerospace applications due to substantial weight savings and improvements in reliability. Recent results have shown that this pursuit is viable, but further efforts will be required, particularly in the area of connectorization, as these CNTs are substantially different from conventional materials familiar to industry (i.e., metals).

Quantifying Environmental Risks and Opportunities for Nano-Scale LiFePO4 and LiMnO2 Cathode Battery Technologies at End-of-Life

  • PI: Dr. Gabrielle Gaustad. Co-PIs: Dr. Callie W. Babbitt, Dr. Brian Landi
  • Start & Finish dates: 9/1/2011-8/31/2014
  • Sponsor: National Science Foundation
  • Award Amount: $300,243
  • Brief Summary: This proposal aims to quantify the magnitude of two specific nanoscale cathode chemistry material flows through material flow analysis. Combined with this, a quantification of specific risks and opportunities for these chemistries at end-of-life will be characterized. For example, characterization of potential leaching in landfills, embodied energy in differing formulations for possible waste-to-energy capture, and exposure hazard and material recovery potential for various recycling techniques. This research complements a currently funded study aimed at developing recovery technologies for these nanoscale batteries at end-of-life.

High Power and High Energy Carbon Electrodes

  • PI: Dr. Brian Landi. Co-PI: Reginald Rogers
  • Start & Finish dates: 4/1/2012-3/31/2013
  • Sponsors: National Reconnaissance Office, Quallion
  • Award Amount: $100,000
  • Brief Summary: In general, electrodes designed for high energy density suffers poor power capability, and vice versa. As such, batteries either have high energy density or high power but not both of them, as required in many applications. The electrodes proposed herein will achieve both high power and high energy density. The objective of this pilot program is to provide an assessment of the energy and power capabilities, cost/performance and potential for application in batteries.

Hybrid Carbon Nanotube Electrodes for Ultra High Energy Density Lithium Ion Batteries

  • PI: Dr. Brian Landi.
  • Start & Finish dates: 7/12/2011-7/11/2014
  • Sponsor: Central Intelligence Agency
  • Award Amount: $359,992
  • Brief Summary: Free-standing carbon nanotube (CNT) electrodes offer the potential for a lightweight, conductive structure to effectively support ultra-high capacity materials like Si and Ge for lithium ion batteries. This research will investigate the synthesis of Si and Ge nanoparticles ex-situ and in-situ with CNTs and measure the anode electrochemical performance. A systematic analysis will be performed using electrochemical characterization (capacity, impedance spectroscopy, conductivity) as well as materials analysis using spectroscopic and microscopic techniques to ascertain the proper combination of Si and Ge with a CNT electrode matrix such that efficient electron and ion transport are achieved. The research described in this proposal is novel and potentially transformative, in that, it can produce electrode technologies capable of doubling today's battery energy density to exceed 350 Wh/kg. Parallel work to leverage the CNT electrodes to support high energy cathode materials (e.g. LiMP04) can further increase the overall battery energy density.

Nanowire Photovoltaic Devices

  • PI: Dr. David Forbes. Co-PI: Dr. Seth Hubbard
  • Start & Finish dates: 7/22/2011-11/30/2013
  • Sponsors: NASA, Firefly Technologies
  • Award Amount: $192,600
  • Brief Summary: RIT, in collaboration with Firefly Technologies, proposes an STTR program for the development of a space solar cell having record efficiency exceeding 40% (AMO) by the introduction of nanowires within the active region of the current limiting sub-cell. The introduction of these nanoscale features may enable realization of an intermediate band solar cell (IBSC), while simultaneously increasing the effective absorption volume that can otherwise limit short circuit current generated by thin quantized layers. The GaAs cell will be modified to contain InAs nanowires to enable an IBSC, which is predicted to demonstrate -45% efficiency under I-sun AMO conditions. InAs nanowires nucleation and epitaxy processes will be developed and enhanced. InAs NWs will be subsequently embedded with a GaAs matrix and the interfacial properties of the nanocomposite material will be investigated for photovoltaic applications. Successful completion of the proposed work will result in ultra-high efficiency, radiation-tolerant space solar cells that are compatible with existing manufacturing processes. Significant cost savings are expected with higher efficiency cells which enables increased payload capability and longer mission durations.

Carbon Nanotube High Energy Storage System

  • PI: Dr. Brian Landi
  • Start & Finish dates: 7/1/2011-6/30/2012
  • Sponsor: National Reconnaissance Office
  • Award Amount: $348,073
  • Brief Summary: The purpose and ultimate goal of this project shall focus on the fundamental development and testing of a 300 Wh/kg Carbon Nanotube (CNT)-based battery. The ability to infuse carbon nanotubes into the cathode, anode, and as current collectors while introducing novel materials such as silicon and germanium, allows for a 2X increase over today's current battery energy density. This effort shall focus on the refinement of the anode and cathode architecture with particular emphasis towards cyclability in the 10s of thousands. Adjustments to the CNT loading of the anode and cathode and the introduction of novel materials will allow for higher depth of discharge (>30%) with low capacity fade.

Assessment of Waste-to-Energy Technologies for the New York State Food Processing Industry

  • PI: Dr. Thomas Trabold.
  • Start & Finish dates: 6/15/2011-8/31/2012
  • Sponsors: New York State Department of Environmental Conservation, RIT
  • Award Amount: $20,622
  • Brief Summary: The proposed project will involve assessment of the potential for conversion of food processing waste into methane-rich biogas, experiments using a lab-scale anaerobic digester to correlate biogas generation to waste properties, and finally environmental and economic assessment of different pathways for converting biogas into usable energy. This effort represents a natural extension of earlier research conducted to provide a first-order assessment of conversion of "typical" wastes produced by processing milk, cheese, tofu and beer.

Improved Carbon Nanotube Wire Conductivity

  • PI: Dr. Brian Landi
  • Start & Finish dates: 3/15/2011-3/15/2013
  • Sponsors: National Reconnaissance Office
  • Award Amount: $242,819
  • Brief Summary: The goal of this research program is to improve the electrical conductivity (Siemens/meter) of commercial as-produced Nanocomp CNT materials by utilizing effective dispersing agents to modify the nanoscale morphology and increase the physical/close-packing arrangement of the bulk CNT networks.

Cooking Oil-to-Fuel Comprehensive Proposal

  • PI: Dr. Thomas Trabold
  • Start & Finish dates: 2/1/2011-1/130/2013
  • Sponsors: Environmental Protection Agency, Monroe County/Department of Environmental Services
  • Award Amount: $71,200
  • Brief Summary: Teaming with Monroe County's Department of Environmental Services, RIT CIMS will provide program management services, fuel process prototyping and quality assurance and regular monitoring of the fuel quality. In addition, CIMS will track the metrics on gallons of waste oil processed, number of collection sites, gallons of biodiesel fuel manufactured, and resulting Greenhouse Gas reduction by using the waste oil, and gallons of petroleum displaced by using biodiesel. Performing this early work at RIT CIMS will also allow the P2I to begin documenting the process and developing the curriculum for the education and outreach tasks. NYSP2I has established relationships with a number of technical, outreach, and community organizations throughout New York State including the 10 Regional Technical Development Centers and Finger Lakes - Lake Ontario Watershed Protection Alliance Partners (FL-LOWPA). These relationships will be leveraged to broaden our reach to geographic areas outside of Rochester, NY where the Institute is located. NYSP2I will provide curriculum development, lessons learned documentation and outreach and education programs and services to disseminate the results of the project so that others can benefit from the knowledge gained in the demonstration project. In addition, RIT CIMS, NYSP2I and Monroe County will jointly coordinate media events to publicize the project to the wider community.

Evaluation of Radiation Hardness of Photovoltaic Devices

  • PI: Dr. David Forbes. Co-PI: Dr. Seth Hubbard
  • Start & Finish dates: 1/1/2011-12/30/2012
  • Sponsors: NASA, Microlink Devices, Inc.
  • Award Amount: $50,000
  • Brief Summary: Space solar cells are required to sustainably produce power over their lifetime under continuous radiation. Novel materials and device architectures must be characterized as to their radiation-hardness or their ability to withstand anticipated radiation environment for a given orbit. RIT will perform a series of test-irradiation-test cycles of GaAs or InP-based solar cells in order to assess the degrading the cells undergo resulting from the irradiation. It is anticipated that multiple cell designs and structures will be evaluated in conjunction with the sponsor. The designs to be evaluated will be single junction (SJ) and multi-junction (MJ) GaAs-based cells fabricated by epitaxial liftoff.

Connectorization of Carbon Nanotube Coaxial Cables

  • PI: Dr. Brian Landi
  • Start & Finish dates: 12/1/2010-6/30/2011
  • Sponsors: National Reconnaissance Office, Spectrolab, Inc.
  • Award Amount: $50,000
  • Brief Summary: RIT will assist Spectrolab in implementing methods of attaching carbon nanotube (CNT) wires to photovoltaic devices. Assistance will be provided in the areas of optimization of processes to reduce the variability in the mechanical strength of attachment, bend testing, thermal cycling, and photovoltaic back-side attachment.

Single Wall Carbon Nanotube Electrode Additives for Li-ion Cells

  • PI: Dr. Brian Landi.
  • Start & Finish dates: 9/15/2011-3/15/2011
  • Sponsor: Central Intelligence Agency
  • Award Amount: $100,085
  • Brief Summary: A series of tasks have been outlined in order to fabricate, characterize, and deliver suitable SWCNT materials which can be evaluated by the Sponsor as a potential conductive additive replacement. The overarching approach is to produce and characterize high quality SWCNT materials produced via laser vaporization in the NPRL, perform preliminary half-cell testing to determine necessary battery design parameters, and then deliver materials to the Sponsor for evaluation of these materials as a potential conductive carbon replacement.

Quantum Dot Enhanced Photovoltaic Devices

  • PI: Dr. David Forbes. Co-PI: Dr. Seth Hubbard
  • Start & Finish dates: 12/22/2010-4/12/2013
  • Sponsors: Air Force Materiel Command, University of Toledo
  • Award Amount: $450,000
  • Brief Summary: This proposal will investigate QD/barrier combinations such as InP/InGaP, GaSb/GaAs in conventional single-junction photovoltaic cells as well as the QD-nipi architecture. Material development and characterization tasks are planned and photovoltaic device design, fabrication, and testing under AM0 will be performed. Radiation hardness of these cells will be evaluated by alpha and beta particle irradiation.

Quantum Dot Doping Nipi Superlattice Photovoltaic Devices

  • PI: Dr. David Forbes. Co-PI: Dr. Seth Hubbard
  • Start & Finish dates: 12/22/2010-4/12/2013
  • Sponsors: Air Force Materiel Command, University of Toledo
  • Award Amount: $149,391
  • Brief Summary: This proposal seeks to address these challenges and shed light on the technology and device physics leading to an intermediate band solar cell. We will accomplish this in two ways. One thrust will focus on Sb materials systems with improved bandgap and little valence band offset for the intermediate band solar cell (IBSC) application. The other thrust will focus on the doping superlattice nipi devices, which allow for longer carrier lifetime, improved absorption coefficients and high QD (Quantum Dot) doping levels. The objectives of this proposal will enable fundamental and innovative research to address many of these challenges and shed light on the approaches and physics of next generation quantum dot solar cells.

Golisano Institute for Sustainability Research Building

  • PI: Dr. Nabil Nasr.
  • Start & Finish dates: 11/27/2010-10/31/2012
  • Sponsor: NIST
  • Award Amount: $13,110,446
  • Brief Summary: A proposal will request funding in support of the construction costs associated with the proposed GIS building.

Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Development

  • PI: Dr. Nabil Nasr. Co-PI: Dr. Michael Haselkorn, Daniel Smith, Dr. Thomas Trabold
  • Start & Finish dates: 10/27/2011-12/31/2013
  • Sponsor: Office of the Chief of Naval Research
  • Award Amount: $1,594,000
  • Brief Summary: The Center for Integrated Manufacturing Studies (CIMS) at Rochester Institute of Technology (RIT) will continue to test and validate the SOFCs technology and examine all aspects of the SOFC life-cycle to reduce its manufacturing and operating costs, and mitigate its environmental impact. This research program will consist of three main efforts: Testing and validation of SOFC to demonstrate that they can meet military and commercial specifications; Development of a pilot facility for prototyping SOFC Assembly/Remanufacturing consistent with service life management models; Development of a Modular SOFC Manufacturing Readiness Demonstration.

Multijunction Solar Cells Lattice-Matched to InP - A Path to High-Efficiency Flexible Photovoltaics

  • PI: Dr. David Forbes.
  • Start & Finish dates: 8/4/2010-5/4/2011
  • Sponsors: NASA, Microlink Devices, Inc.
  • Award Amount: $50,000
  • Brief Summary: Space solar cells are required to sustainably produce power over their lifetime under continuous radiation. Novel materials and device architectures must be characterized as to their radiation-hardness or their ability to withstand anticipated radiation environment for given orbit. RIT will perform a series of test-irradiation-test cycles of GaAs/InP solar cells in order to assess the degradation the cells undergo resulting from the irradiation. It is anticipated that multiple cell designs and structures will be evaluated in conjunction with the sponsor.

Environmentally Preferable End-of-Life Management for Li-Ion Batteries

  • PI: Dr. Gabrielle Gaustad. Co-PIs: Dr. Callie W. Babbitt, Dr. Brian Landi
  • Start & Finish dates: 7/1/2010-6/30/2012
  • Sponsor: New York State Energy Research & Development Authority
  • Award Amount: $195,558
  • Brief Summary: This project will develop economical, environmentally preferable technologies for Li-ion battery recovery, remanufacturing, and recycling operations that simultaneously reduce the environmental impact of the battery life-cycle and help meet NYBEST battery manufacturing goals.

Electrical Transport Mechanisms in Carbon Nanotube Wires

  • PI: Dr. Brian Landi.
  • Start & Finish dates: 7/12/2010-7/11/2013
  • Sponsor: Central Intelligence Agency
  • Award Amount: $359,407
  • Brief Summary: The proposed research involves both measurement and modeling of bulk CNT wire structures to provide a quantitative assessment of the fundamental electrical and mechanical properties of CNTs in such environments. The electrical transport properties of pristine bulk CNT wires will be analyzed and compared to the material response of CNT structures when exposed to alpha, beta, and UV with and without atomic oxygen. Experimental determination of the CNT durability under simulated aerospace conditions will provide a framework for empirical models to be established for morphology-dependent behavior in next generation wires. Ultimately, the proposed research is expected to understand the fundamental mechanism of electron transport in CNT wires for future intelligence community applications.

High Performance Nanoparticle Materials for Li-ion Battery Industry

  • PI: Dr. Brian Landi. Co-PI: Paul Stiebitz
  • Start & Finish dates: 6/1/2010-6/1/2010
  • Sponsors: New York State Energy Research & Development Authority, Cerion Energy, Inc.
  • Award Amount: $73,259
  • Brief Summary: Cerion Enterprises is developing cerium based nano-materials for the Li-ion battery market to overcome the limitations of the current technology. These materials will become the basis for new electrodes which would be manufactured by a partner company. The PIs will support this work by constructing test cells to validate Cerion's technology including characterization results on lithium ion capacity and rate capability.

Radiation Hard Quantum Well Multijunction Solar Cells

  • PI: Dr. David Forbes. Co-PI: Dr. Seth Hubbard
  • Start & Finish dates: 5/3/2010-11/2/2010
  • Sponsors: Department of Defense, CFD Research Corporation
  • Award Amount: $44,999
  • Brief Summary: We propose to develop a QW-based multi-junction cell that exhibits enhanced efficiency with respect to a standard, non-QW containing cell. In addition, we will determine the radiation resistance of the QW multi-junction cell as it pertains to the space radiation environment. In Phase I, our efforts will concentrate on the design and demonstration of the middle cell as this is the most sensitive to radiation effects. It is expected that the design and implementation of QW's in this middle cell will be directly applicable to either a SOA lattice-matched cell as well as a metamorphic cell. Phase II will continue the development by implementing and optimizing the QW response and radiation resistance within a multi-junction cell.

Next Generation Lithium Ion Battery Energy Storage Systems

  • PI: Dr. Michael Haselkorn.
  • Start & Finish dates: 2/25/2011-2/24/2012
  • Sponsor: New York State Energy Research and Development Authority, Ultralife Corporation
  • Award Amount: $109,703
  • Brief Summary: The Center for Integrated Manufacturing Studies (CIMS) at Rochester Institute of Technology proposes to assist Ultralife Corporation under NYSERDA PON 1704 to develop a framework for developing a Remanufacturing Product Support Model for Battery Systems. Specifically CIMS will provide design for remanufacturing training, identification of high value components or sub-assemblies, and development of a product support and business model.

Wide Bandgap Nanostructured Space Photovoltaics (STTR Phase I)

  • PI: Dr. David Forbes. Co-PI: Dr. Seth Hubbard
  • Start & Finish dates: 1/29/2010-12/31/2010
  • Sponsors: NASA, Firefly Technologies
  • Award Amount: $47,599
  • Brief Summary: Firefly, in collaboration with Rochester Institute of Technology, proposes an STTR program for the development of a wide-bandgap space solar cell capable of efficient operation at temperatures above 3000C. Efficiency enhancement will be achieved by the introduction of quantum wells within the active region of the wide-gap base material. The introduction of these nanoscale features will enable harvesting of low-energy photons that are normally lost by transmission through the wide bandgap material.

Mechanisms of Radiation-Induced Effects in Carbon Nanotubes

  • PI: Dr. Brian Landi.
  • Start & Finish dates: 1/1/2010-12/131/201
  • Sponsor: Department of Defense
  • Award Amount: $1,047,608
  • Brief Summary: In the present proposal, a comprehensive strategy has been outlined between researchers from the NanoPower Research Labs (NPRL) at RIT and the Naval Research Labs (NRL) to develop a parameter-response relationship between CNT properties (i.e., diameter, electronic type, aspect ratio, etc.) and geometric thickness (i.e. individual nanotubes, thin films, and bulk papers) under equivalent total ionization dose (TID) and displacement damage dose (Dd) exposure for different radiation particles. The parameter-response relationship will evaluate effects on electrical transport properties (i.e. conductivity, mobility, etc.) as a function of radiation for separated chiral fractions of CNTs. Modeling of the data will provide a theoretical physics-based understanding of the transport phenomena and be able to provide guidance to increase the tolerance of intended device structures.

Quantum Wire III-V Solar Cell

  • PI: Paul Stiebitz. Co-PI: Dr. David Forbes
  • Start & Finish dates: 11/1/2009-10/31/2010
  • Sponsors: Air Force Materiel Command, University of Toledo
  • Award Amount: $50,000
  • Brief Summary: The NanoPower Research Lab (NPRL) at Rochester Institute of Technology, in cooperation with NASA-Glenn, will develop quantum dot nipi devices based on GaAs for enhanced photovoltaic efficiency and radiation hardness. Epitaxial growth and processing techniques will be developed by NPRL to enable this novel device architecture.

Third Generation Based Lithium Ion Battery

  • PI: Dr. Brian Landi. Co-PI: Paul Stiebitz
  • Start & Finish dates: 10/5/2009-8/14/2010
  • Sponsors: National Reconnaissance Office, Lockheed Martin
  • Award Amount: $450,000
  • Brief Summary: The focus of the program is to develop flight-ready components for a cube-sat application, including carbon nanotube-enabled lithium ion batteries, carbon nanotube wiring, and next-generation solar cells. In addition, there are parallel research and development efforts to advance a 3rd generation lithium ion battery utilizing carbon nanotubes, high voltage cathodes, and high voltage electrolytes. The objective of the program is to develop a suitable high energy density battery that exceeds state-of-the-art with appropriate cyclability to meet the sponsor's needs.

Extended-Lifetime Radioisotope Batteries

  • PI: Paul Stiebitz.
  • Start & Finish dates: 8/24/2009-8/24//2010
  • Sponsors: Air Force Materiel Command, Alpha V
  • Award Amount: $364,847
  • Brief Summary: Under this project, NREL will work with the Naval Research Laboratories to develop and test a first generation redioisotope battery consisting of an integrated radioactive source, photovoltaic cell, and an electroluminescent phosphor. In summary, NPRL's contributions to this project are: develop techniques for depositing uniform layers of phosphor at the prescribed thickness; coat test samples with a variety of phosphors known to be responsive to radioisotope; construct and characterize n-i-p photovoltaic cells; construct and test first generation device.

Hyperspectral Polymer Solar Cells

  • PI: Paul Stiebitz. Co-PI: Dr. Brian Landi.
  • Start & Finish dates: 7/1/2009-6/30/2010
  • Sponsor: U.S. Department of Energy
  • Award Amount: $984,000
  • Brief Summary: The objective of this project is to produce a series of single junction polymeric solar cells using different NIR absorbing molecules and combine them using nanocrystalline tunnel junctions to produce the polymeric analog to a multi-junction III-V solar cell.

Accelerating the Transition of Fuel Cell Systems

  • PI: Dr. Nabil Nasr. Co-PI: Dr. Michael Haselkorn, Dr. James Lee
  • Start & Finish dates: 9/24/2008-3/19/2011
  • Sponsor: Army Materiel Command
  • Award Amount: $1,107,000
  • Brief Summary: C3R© at RIT is proposing a program to accelerate the application of fuel cell technology into the Army stationary and mobile units. This program will focus on the critical technological, infrastructure and economic challenges preventing the widespread application of fuel cells including: Fuel Cell Performance, durability and reliability testing, and Manufacturing practices and materials for fuel cell technologies. This approach will address the critical technological, infrastructure and economic challenges preventing the widespread application of fuel cells into Army mobile and stationary systems.

Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Development

  • PI: Dr. Nabil Nasr. Co-PI: Dr. Michael Haselkorn.
  • Start & Finish dates: 7/11/2008-3/29/2011
  • Sponsor: Office of the Chief of Naval Research
  • Award Amount: $1,237,000
  • Brief Summary: C3R© at RIT will examine all aspects of the fuel cell life-cycle to improve its reliability and durability, reduce its production and operating costs, and mitigate its environmental impact.

 

Manufacturing

Direct and Embodied Ecological Impacts across the Fullerene Life Cycle

  • PI: Dr. Callie W. Babbitt. Co-PIs: Dr. Gabrielle Gaustad, Dr. Anna Christina Tyler
  • Start & Finish dates: 8/1/2014-7/31/2017
  • Sponsor: National Science Foundation
  • Award Amount: $300,854
  • Brief Summary: Impacts of engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) on the natural environment are poorly understood, particularly as the materials themselves undergo significant changes over their life cycle (from pristine forms, to functionalized derivatives, to being incorporated into products) and further evolution after being released into an ecosystem (transport through and partitioning between environmental compartments), potentially resulting in highly varied life cycle impacts. These impacts are also challenging to estimate because existing 'life cycle impact assessment' factors have yet to be developed for ENMs and may not fully comprehend the most relevant impacts to ecosystems in which they are released. Therefore, this project will create and apply novel empirical and modeling approaches to characterize ecological impact across the entire life cycle of a common suite of ENMs: fullerenes, a type of carbonaceous nanomaterials increasingly being used in renewable energy, biomedical, environmental, and cosmetic applications.

Technology Insertion For Recapitalization of Legacy Systems

  • PI: Dr. Nabil Nasr
  • Start & Finish dates: 7/1/2014-9/30/2016
  • Sponsor: Office of the Chief of Naval Research
  • Award Amount: $354,425
  • Brief Summary: Golisano Institute for Sustainability proposes to evaluate how the innovative and entrepreneurial ideas of the Monster Garage, rapid and low-cost development of needed capability, can be applied to generate solutions to US Marine Corps vehicle problems that affect platform readiness and sustainment cost. The goal of the research is a data-based decision process that will help to identify and validate the best opportunities from a Total Life Cycle Management standpoint, and will develop nontraditional processes for rapid and cost effective resolution of sustainment challenges. Specifically, a synthesis process will be developed to pull together sustainment data with respect to technical performance, supportability, process efficiency, and life cycle cost, in order to support improved sustainment decision making. A cost-effective process for recapitalization of components that are currently being discarded or not effectively maintained will also be developed.

Performance and Evaluation Testing for Ink and Print Media

  • PI: Andrij Harlan
  • Start & Finish dates: 7/1/2014-6/30/2015
  • Sponsors: Multiple
  • Award Amount: $178,383
  • Brief Summary: CIMS provides standard and ongoing performance testing and evaluations on paper, toner, ink, printer products, overprint varnish (OPV) and primer performance, print media, and print cartridge client samples. Pricing is standardized based on the testing/evaluation utilizing any of the following methods: ASTM performance testing of ink and print media; Non-ASTM performance testing of ink and print media; Printing Standards Audit (PSA). Testing is performed in the Imaging Products Lab (IPL) and/or the Printing Applications Lab (PAL).

Manufacturing Technologies

  • PI: Andrij Harlan
  • Start & Finish dates: 7/1/2014-6/30/2015
  • Sponsors: Multiple
  • Award Amount: $12,192
  • Brief Summary: CIMS, in working with small and medium-sized companies, offers standardized materials and process testing services to include failure and process analysis. Tests typically are on small company product samples and include mechanical property measurements and chemical analysis - routine tests for hardness, strength and elongation, and micro-structural and optical measurement. Pricing is standardized based on the test.

Imaging Product Lab Evaluations

  • PI: Robert Matesic
  • Start & Finish dates: 7/1/2013-6/30/2014
  • Sponsors: Multiple
  • Award Amount: $165,701
  • Brief Summary: American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) performance testing of ink and print media; Evaluation of all Imaging Products: ink, paper, toner, cartridges, and printer products.

Evaluation of Ceramic Snow Plow Shoes

  • PI: Dr. Michael Haselkorn.
  • Start & Finish dates: 2/1/2014-8/15/2014
  • Sponsor: Cornell University
  • Award Amount: $5,000
  • Brief Summary: Golisano Institute of Sustainability proposes to develop a laboratory wear test to evaluate the wear resistance of RocCera, LLC snow plow shoes for Cornell University's Center for Materials Research JumpStart Program. Once the wear test is developed, it will be used to compare the wear resistance of RocCera's Road Roe Ceramic Snow Plow Shoes to the wear resistance of standard steel snow plow shoes. The JumpStart Program helps New York State small businesses solve identifiable problems related to materials. JumpStart's project will RocCera aims to improve longevity of snow shoes while maintaining performance as standard steel shoes require several replacements throughout the winter season.

New York State Center of Excellence in Sustainable Manufacturing

  • PI: Dr. Michael Thurston. Co-PI: Dr. Nabil Nasr.
  • Start & Finish dates: 10/1/2013-12/31/2013
  • Sponsor: New York State Department of Economic Development
  • Award Amount: $250,000
  • Brief Summary: The NY State Center of Excellence in Sustainable Manufacturing (the Center) will develop technologies in collaboration with NY State manufacturing companies to help make their products and processes more sustainable, and therefore, more competitive; and to increase the number of value-add manufacturing jobs.

New York State Center of Excellence in Sustainable Manufacturing

  • PI: Dr. Michael Thurston. Co-PI: Dr. Nabil Nasr.
  • Start & Finish dates: 10/1/2013-9/30/2014
  • Sponsor: Empire State Development
  • Award Amount: $500,000
  • Brief Summary: The NY State Center of Excellence in Sustainable Manufacturing (the Center) will develop technologies in collaboration with NY State manufacturing companies to help make their products and processes more sustainable, and therefore, more competitive; and to increase the number of value-add manufacturing jobs.

A Non-Destructive Gear Damage Assessment Method (Correspondence Between the Time-Domain Condition Indicators and Cracked Surface Image Feature)

  • PI: Dr. Nenad Nenadic. Co-PI: Dr. Michael Haselkorn
  • Start & Finish dates: 9/1/2013-6/30/2014
  • Sponsor: U.S. Army Research Laboratory
  • Award Amount: $42,184
  • Brief Summary: The Center for Integrated Manufacturing Studies (CIMS) proposes to investigate the opportunity of improving damage assessment of cracked teeth on spur gears via establishing correlations (in a broad sense) between the time-domain condition indicators extracted from non-destructive measurements and analysis of images of cracked surfaces during the postmortem analysis. Through this work, CIMS will (1) collect new data on a fatigue-based tester, that has already been design, built, and used in previous studies, (2) augment already existing dataset, and (3) image the cracked surfaces using both traditional 2D and 3D images. A successful outcome of the proposed study will encourage subsequent studies in the noisier gearbox environments, which, in turn, would allow better damage assessment for diagnostic and prognostics.

GIS Building and Testbeds

  • PI: Dr. Nabil Nasr.
  • Start & Finish dates: 12/19/2012-12/18/2014
  • Sponsor: Empire State Development
  • Award Amount: $10,000,000
  • Brief Summary: RIT is seeking $10 million for Phase II of construction and equipping the new GIS building as a priority project of the Finger Lakes Regional Economical Development Council to be used to equip the labs and testbeds in the new facility.

Evaluating Sustainable Production and Consumption Dynamics in Complex Product Systems

  • PI: Dr. Callie W. Babbitt. Co-PIs: Dr. Anna Christina Tyler, Dr. Eric Williams.
  • Start & Finish dates: 9/1/2012 -8/31/2015
  • Sponsor: National Science Foundation
  • Award Amount: $298,609
  • Brief Summary: The aim of this research is to adapt concepts and models from the field of biological community ecology and apply them in the context of industrial ecology to analyze environmental impacts and test sustainable management strategies for entire "communities" of consumer products. Because the consumer electronic product system typifies the challenge that we need to address - rapid growth and evolution, significant sustainability impact, complex interrelationships between production and consumption dynamics - this community of products will be used to operationalize the research agenda. However, anticipated findings and models will be translatable to other emerging consumer and industrial product sectors, including renewable energy resources, nano-materials, and bio-based products.

Gear Fatigue Diagnostics and Prognostics

  • PI: Dr. Nenad Nenadic.
  • Start & Finish dates: 12/1/2011-12/1/2012
  • Sponsor: Office of the Chief of Naval Research
  • Award Amount: $45,000
  • Brief Summary: This research is to examine crack propagation in NASA-designed spur gears used in helicopters. This program builds on previous work accomplished under ARL Cooperative Agreement Number W911NF-09-2-002.

Finger Lakes Food Cluster Initiative

  • PI: Dr. Nabil Nasr. Co-PIs: Andrij Harlan, Kathleen Kosciolek
  • Start & Finish dates: 10/1/2011-9/30/2015
  • Sponsor: U.S. Department of Labor
  • Award Amount: $997,470
  • Brief Summary: The proposed project capitalizes on the unique opportunity presented by the Jobs and Innovation Accelerator Challenge by presenting a comprehensive approach to advancing the Food Processing Cluster in the Finger Lakes region. The project will provide a coordinated cluster-based approach to help the region prosper by assisting this important cluster to reach its potential through practical, hands-on assistance programs, training and co-collaborative partnerships.

Expanding Industrial Ecology by Applying Community Ecology Principles and Developing Diversity Metrics for Sustainable Product Systems

  • PI: Dr. Callie W. Babbitt.
  • Start & Finish dates: 9/6/2011-9/4/2014
  • Sponsor: Environmental Protection Agency
  • Award Amount: $51,000
  • Brief Summary: This research project will pioneer new metaphors and models for Industrial Ecology based on fundamental principles of community ecology borrowed from biological systems. Specifically, this project investigates how materials and products of environmental importance are structured at the community scale and managed with respect to environmental goals. Test cases initially focus on opportunities for environmental improvement of information and communication technology products.

Reducing the Burden of Global Materials Manufacture: Enabling Increased Use of Secondary and Renewable Materials in Production Planning

  • PI: Dr. Gabrielle Gaustad.
  • Start & Finish dates: 9/1/2011 -8/31/2013
  • Sponsors: National Science Foundation, MIT
  • Award Amount: $79,237
  • Brief Summary: This work would provide both a quantitative assessment of the nature and magnitude of raw material quality uncertainty for at least three materials industries - light metals, rubber, and biomaterials - and an analytical characterization of the potential for uncertainty-aware planning models to appropriately value and manage quality uncertainty for a wide variety of industries. Together these contributions will make it possible to increase the usage of secondary and renewable raw materials in production - which has both ecological and economic benefits.

Thermal Spray Development for Steering Shafts

  • PI: Dr. Micheal Haselkorn.
  • Start & Finish dates: 7/17/2011-10/30/2011
  • Sponsors: Empire State Development, NP&G Innovations, New York State Office of Science, Technology & Academic Research
  • Award Amount: $68,387
  • Brief Summary: Meritor has requested that the Center for Integrated Manufacturing Studies (CIMS) at Rochester Institute of Technology (RIT) develop a twin wire arc recovery process for three steering components. For this reason, CIMS proposes a two phase program that will first develop the twin wire arc coating application parameters (Phase 1), and then scale-up the process to coat the three (3) steering components (Phase 2). The technology developed will be transferred to Meritor through two days of training at CIMS and supplying a twin wire arc coating application manual.

Development of a Tire Splitting Machine for Tire Tie Production.

  • PI: Dr. Micheal Haselkorn.
  • Start & Finish dates: 7/8/2011-6/30/2013
  • Sponsors: Empire State Development, NP&G Innovations, New York State Office of Science, Technology & Academic Research
  • Award Amount: $40,000
  • Brief Summary: The objective of this project is to develop and demonstrate, on a prototype scale, a tire section slitting process that will produce slit tire sections that will meet NP&G's straightness specification. The objective of Task 1 is to determine the reason the slit tire sections do not meet NP&G's straightness specification. The objective of Task 2 is to develop a new slitting concept. The objective of Task 3 is to demonstrate the concept developed in Task 2 by fabricating prototype slitting equipment.

Developing Environmentally Benign Battery Recycling Processes: Characterizing "green" Leaching Agents

  • PI: Dr. Gabrielle Gaustad. Co-PI: Dr. Callie W. Babbitt
  • Start & Finish dates: 7/1/2011-6/30/2014
  • Sponsors: NYS Dept of Environmental Conservation, RIT
  • Award Amount: $150,000
  • Brief Summary: This research will fill knowledge and development gaps in sustainable management of emerging lithium ion batteries at end of life. Ongoing efforts to comprehend environmental and economic impacts associated with next-generation battery life-cycles have cited key uncertainties: environmental impacts of recycling technologies, human health risk during end-of-life processing, and the cost-benefit-risk nexus for alternative treatment techniques. Many performance parameters also remain unquantified, such as recovery yields for new, greener recycling technologies and the related energy and chemical savings potential associated with recovering scarce metals from the waste battery stream. To address these challenges and opportunities, this work will combine fundamental bench-scale technology characterization with a multi-criteria decision tool focused on the replacement of harsh inorganic acids with greener, bio-based options in an environmentally benign battery recycling processes.

Twenty Percent Energy Improvement in GM Manufacturing by 2020

  • PI: Dr. Nabil Nasr. Co-PI: Dr. Anahita Williamson
  • Start & Finish dates: 10/15/2010-12/31/2010
  • Sponsor: U.S. Department of Labor
  • Award Amount: $44,780
  • Brief Summary: In the automotive industry, the majority of the life-cycle energy used by the product is related to its operation by the consumer; however, as fuel efficiency and environmental concerns increase, the proportion of life-cycle energy used in manufacturing of the consumer product cannot be ignored. This project examines how manufacturing energy can be reduced by twenty percent over the next decade. The focus is broad based with purchased energy, the greenhouse gas footprint, and the use of alternative energy sources all important aspects of the energy-use model. The goal is a more sustainable enterprise for vehicle manufacturing.

Biomechanical Ergonomic Evaluation of Heath Side Handle Plunger Bar

  • PI: Dr. Michael Haselkorn.
  • Start & Finish dates: 8/1/2010-830/2010
  • Sponsor: Northeast Gas Association
  • Award Amount: $14,500
  • Brief Summary: A group of experienced field technicians will participate in an ergonomic assessment study to evaluate the physical demands of using a plunger bar or needle bar, used to detect and measure subsurface natural gas, as participants perform the work activity in a typical workplace environment.

T1-4523-008 MEDAL: Support Services

  • PI: Dr. Nabil Nasr.
  • Start & Finish dates: 9/7/2010-10/18/2010
  • Sponsor: Office of the Chief of Naval Research, Referentia Systems Inc.
  • Award Amount: $50,000
  • Brief Summary: The proposal effort is divided into two potential research areas as follows: Evaluation of the corrosion sensors developed by Dr. Lloyd Hihara and Evaluation of T-Rex software for application to military fleet health monitoring. The corrosion sensor evaluation work will be conducted in collaboration with the Hawaii Corrosion Laboratory at the University of Hawaii. The T-Rex software evaluation will be conducted in collaboration with Referentia Systems Incorporated.

Market Expansion for Advanced Manufacturing Clusters

  • PI: Dr. Nabil Nasr.
  • Start & Finish dates: 1/1/2010-9/30/2011
  • Sponsor: New York State Office of Science, Technology & Academic Research
  • Award Amount: $50,000
  • Brief Summary: CIMS is proposing to use this NYSTAR grant of $50,000 to expand market opportunities, for advanced manufacturing related clusters, through better methods of marketing and promotion of company capabilities. Due to the vast potential to expand into new markets, the efforts described in this statement of work will focus on assisting companies to properly prepare for and participate in targeted industry trade shows.

Roadmap Implementation for the Revitalization of Upstate New York Manufacturing

  • PI: Dr. Nabil Nasr.
  • Start & Finish dates: 10/1/2009-9/30/2011
  • Sponsor: New York State Office of Science, Technology & Academic Research
  • Award Amount: $564,000
  • Brief Summary: The goal of this project is to accelerate and enhance the ability of the strongest regional clusters to take advantage of opportunities resulting from competitive knowledge transfer and active innovation assistance. In order to do this, CIMS will continue the development of the Knowledge Clearinghouse and Innovation Test Bed.

Remanufacturing Assistance Center

  • PI: Dr. Nabil Nasr.
  • Start & Finish dates: 10/1/2009-9/30/2011
  • Sponsor: New York State Office of Science, Technology & Academic Research
  • Award Amount: $301,000
  • Brief Summary: Continued work with companies to help them integrate remanufacturing into their production strategies, and support continued advancement of research and technology development in the field of remanufacturing. Strategies will ensure the success of this work plan and include: Applied Research and Technology Transfer; direct Assistance to Companies, and Education and Training. The opportunities for continued growth of remanufacturing as a global competitiveness strategy are significant, particularly for small and medium size companies.

5th Global Conference on Sustainable Product Development and Life Cycle Engineering to be held at Rochester Institute of Technology, September 18-21, 2007

  • PI: Dr. Nabil Nasr.
  • Start & Finish dates: 8/15/2007-7/31/2011
  • Sponsor: NSF
  • Award Amount: $49,840
  • Brief Summary: Rochester Institute of Technology (RIT) is organizing the 5th Global Conference On Sustainable Product Development and Life Cycle Engineering to be held in Rochester NY, September 18-21, 2007. The NSF requested funds of $49,840 will be used for 30 participants (registration, hotel, travel and other fixed costs) to attend this conference

Defense Systems Modernization and Sustainment Initiative

  • PI: Dr. Nabil Nasr. Co-PI: Dr. Michael Thurston
  • Start & Finish dates: 3/29/2007-3/31/2013
  • Sponsor: U.S. Department of Transportation
  • Award Amount: $1,412,445
  • Brief Summary: The proposed work plan continues research and technology development that supports sustainment and modernization of Navy weapon systems. The Center for Remanufacturing and Resource Recovery at RIT will leverage experience in remanufacturing, life-cycle design, and health management and maintenance support practices to develop new and improved technologies and processes for life cycle support. These technologies and tools aid in platform design and maintenance, provide enhanced operational performance, and guide remanufacturing/recapitalization decisions for current and new military systems. The proposal effort is divided into four research areas: Sustainment Testbed; Innovation Based Design; Remote Monitoring and Advanced Support Concepts; System Resilience and Survivability.

 

Mobility

Using Local Storage and Generation to Achieve Flexible Demand for Charging Electric Vehicles

  • PI: Dr. Michael Thurston. Co-PI: Dr. Nenad Nenadic
  • Start & Finish dates: 6/12/2014-9/30/2014
  • Sponsor: New York State Energy Research and Development Authority
  • Award Amount: $140,000
  • Brief Summary: Golisano Institute for Sustainability propose a demonstration study to investigate and document approaches for flattening the expected energy demand peaks by using local energy storage (batteries) and local energy generation (photovoltaic and fuel cells). The time-of-use rates will be carefully considered as both constraints and as tunable parameters for optimization of the overall performance. The unique existing infrastructure, including four electric vehicle charging stations, Ultralife's lithium-ion -50 kWh of storage, 40 kW of GIS on-site photovoltaic energy generation, and integrated monitoring system will leverage the proposed work. The demonstration will be based on real charging patterns of different PEV models captured at GIS's four charging stations; the New York State weather-dependent, real-life solar generation patterns; and measured efficiency and aging of two types of battery storage (the existing lithium-ion and the new sodium-based pack).

Assessing Long-Term Technological Progress for Alternative Transport Energy Sources

  • PI: Dr. Eric Williams.
  • Start & Finish dates: 5/26/2012-8/31/2013
  • Sponsors: National Science Foundation, Arizona State University
  • Award Amount: $179,187
  • Brief Summary: The objective of this project is to significantly advance modeling of technological progress of alternative energies by developing and applying new methods to: 1) Estimate long-term bounds on economic and environmental performance; 2) Assess life cycle economic and environmental costs; 3)Assess uncertainty in technological forecasting. The integrated research and education program develops the relevant methods and case studies and communicates these to a broad group of stakeholders. This modeling system is developed in the context of applied case studies of new generation bio-fuels (cellulosic and microbial), photovoltaics, and wind power, all applied to the energy service of delivering transport (passenger vehicle-km).

Urban Form and Energy Use Explored Through Dynamic Networked Infrastructure Model

  • PI: Dr. Eric Williams.
  • Start & Finish dates: 5/12/2012-8/31/2013
  • Sponsors: National Science Foundation, Arizona State University, Georgia Institute of Technology
  • Award Amount: $275,213
  • Brief Summary: This project aims to clarify connections between urban form use and energy use in the built environment (buildings and paved surfaces) and transport. Specific research questions addressed are: 1. How do different urban forms and patterns of land use contribute to energy use and GHG emissions? 2. How does urban energy use and GHG emissions evolve as a community changes over time? 3. How do socioeconomic characteristics of the population influence these patterns of land use and travel behavior together with their implications for energy and emissions? These questions are addressed by building a networked infrastructure model which represents the life cycle energy use of buildings and transport by mapping energy use in travel analysis zones (TAZ) to a spatial network connected according to residents' travel between TAZs for different purposes. The model accounts for life cycle impacts in that construction/manufacture, operation and end-of-life of buildings, roads and vehicles are included. The model is implemented through case studies of two Phoenix sub-areas, one in downtown Phoenix, which is undergoing redevelopment towards higher density housing and the second, a low density suburban area at the edge of Phoenix which has undergone significant growth in the last two decades.

Golisano Institute for Sustainability (GIS)

  • PI: Dr. Nabil Nasr.
  • Start & Finish dates: 4/1/2008-12/31/2011
  • Sponsor: New York State Dormitory Authority
  • Award Amount: $12,000,000
  • Brief Summary: This proposal requests $12 million under the NYS EDAP ($10 million) and NYS CAS ($2 million) grant programs. It will substantially contribute to the construction and overall program success of Phase I of a two-phase design and construction process for the Golisano Institute of Technology to begin in September 2008.

Enhancement of LEEDS Decision Tool for E-CRAFT

  • PI: Dr. Nabil Nasr.
  • Start & Finish dates: 3/8/2007-3/13/2012
  • Sponsor: Office of the Chief of Naval Research
  • Award Amount: $34,600
  • Brief Summary: The work proposed will further the research work of life-cycle methodologies and software tools to aid in the operation, maintenance, and evaluation of a novel naval ship design jointly sponsored by Office of Naval Research (ONR) and Matanuska-Susitna Borough of Alaska (MSB). Results of this research will lead to the development of new life-cycle analysis methods within the Life-cycle Engineering and Economic Decision System (LEEDS) software framework developed at Rochester Institute of Technology (RIT).

Alternative Fuels & Life-cycle Engineering Program

  • PI: Dr. Nabil Nasr. Co-PI: Dr. Michael Haselkorn, Dr. Michael Thurston
  • Start & Finish dates: 11/29/2006-11/28/2013
  • Sponsor: U.S. Department of Transportation
  • Award Amount: $3,413,814
  • Brief Summary: The Alternative Fuels and Life-cycle Engineering Program at the Center for Integrated Manufacturing Studies (CIMS) at Rochester Institute of Technology (RIT) will focus on expanding the use of alternative fuels (fuels other than gasoline and diesel), extending the life cycle of vehicles, and promoting the use of remanufactured components. The goal of the program is to improve the performance, service life and safety of America's public transportation fleet, with a focus on buses, light trucks, and automobiles.

 

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