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Nutrition Management

Curriculum

The Nutrition Management program leads to a BS degree and meets the education requirements of the Accreditation Council for Education in Nutrition and Dietetics (ACEND), a division of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics (previously the American Dietetic Association). The pre-professional phase (years 1 and 2) involves core courses in basic sciences, food science, basic nutrition, mathematics, liberal arts, and business. The professional phase (years 3 and 4) includes practicum experiences in various upper-division courses. See Typical Course Sequence chart below for outline of courses.

Students also complete three blocks of approved co-op education experience. One co-op may be waived for transfer students possessing at least an associates degree. 

Minors

Students pursuing a bachelor’s degree have the option to complete a minor to complement their Nutrition Management degree. This allows students to develop another area of professional expertise or pursue an area of personal interest. Completion of a minor is formally designated on the baccalaureate transcript, highlighting this accomplishment to employers and graduate schools.

Common minors for Nutrition Management students include Exercise Science, Communications, Psychology and Business.

Immersions

Immersions are a series of three related general education courses. The student-selected nine credit hour requirement supports deeper learning within a focus area. In many cases, an immersion can lead to a Minor with the addition of two courses.  All students need to declare an immersion, but minors are optional.  Please note that not all minors have a corresponding immersion and vice-versa. 

Common immersions for Nutrition Management students include Psychology, Sociology, Public Policy and a foreign language.

Typical Course Sequence

Course Credit Hours
First Year
Principles of Food Production FOOD-121 3
Introduction to the basic principles involved in the preparation of high quality food. Topics include product identification, market forms, varieties, availability, composition, standards of quality, preparation techniques, and function of foods and ingredients. Standard methods of preparation will be introduced. Professionalism in appearance and work habits, self-organization, management, teamwork, and techniques for efficient food production are stressed.***Fee: Lab fee associated with this course** (This course is restricted to HSPS-BS and HSPS-AAS Major students.) Lecture/Lab 6, Credits 3 (Fall, Spring)
First Year LAS Elective 3
Student chooses from a select list of courses to introduce them to the intellectual life of the university, and provide a focus on communication skills to prepare students for future coursework and lifelong learning
General-Organic-Biochemistry I CHMG-111 4
This course is a foundations course in chemistry; no chemistry background is required. Fundamentals include: dimensional analysis; matter and energy; atomic theory; molecular structure; chemical bonding; chemical reactions; solution chemistry, states of matter, reaction rates, equilibrium, and acid/base chemistry. The lecture is complemented by hands-on laboratory exercises with workshop-style problem sessions in which the student will gain experience with basic laboratory techniques: gravimetric, volumetric, thermal and titration analyses, and use these techniques to analyze chemical reactions. The course material will emphasize the relationship between chemistry and modern sociological, nutritional and environmental issues. Lab 3, Lecture 3, Credits 4 (Fall)
College Algebra MATH-101 3
This course provides the background for an introductory level, non-trigonometry based calculus course. The topics include a review of the fundamentals of algebra: solutions of linear, fractional, and quadratic equations, functions and their graphs, polynomial, exponential, logarithmic and rational functions, and systems of linear equations. Lecture 3, Credits 3 (Fall, Spring)
Introduction to Psychology PSYCH-101 3
Introduction to the field of psychology. Provides a survey of basic concepts, theories, and research methods. Topics include: thinking critically with psychological science; neuroscience and behavior; sensation and perception; learning; memory; thinking, language, and intelligence; motivation and emotion; personality; psychological disorders and therapy; and social psychology. Lecture, Credits 3 (Fall, Spring, Summer)
First Year Writing 3
Student chooses from a select list of courses (UWRT-150, ENGL-150, ISTE-101) to introduce them to the intellectual life of the university, and provide a focus on communication skills to prepare students for future coursework and lifelong learning
Contemporary Nutrition NUTR-215 3
This is an introductory course in contemporary nutrition issues. This course covers the study of specific nutrients and their functions, the development of dietary standards and guides and how these standards are applied throughout the lifecycle. Students learn to analyze their own diets and develop strategies to make any necessary dietary changes for a lifetime of good health. Current health and nutrition problems and nutrition misinformation will be discussed. Lecture 3, Credits 3 (Fall, Spring)
General-Organic-Biochemistry II CHMG-112 4
The course covers the foundations of organic chemistry and biochemistry. Fundamentals include organic nomenclature and structure, functional groups including alcohols, carbonyls, amines, and organic reactions. The course then applies functional group chemistry to the study of carbohydrates, lipids, nucleic acids and proteins. The lecture is complemented by laboratory exercises in which the student will gain experienced with organic laboratory techniques. Methods of separating, purifying, and characterizing organic compounds are cov- ered. The lecture/lab course will familiarize students with the relationship between organic chemistry, biochemistry, and modern pharmaceutical, nutritional and environmental issues. (Prerequisites: CHMG-111 or equivalent course.) Lab 3, Lecture 3, Credits 4 (Spring)
Microbiology in Health and Disease MEDS-106 3
This course will provide first-year exercise science students with a strong foundation for successful transition to university life. The course will introduce them to key personnel and resources essential for academic and personal achievement at RIT. Students will also develop a peer-based learning community with group projects centered on exercise science. Lecture 1, Credits 1 (Fall)
Principles of Microeconomics ECON-101 3
Microeconomics studies the workings of individual markets. That is, it examines the interaction of the demanders of goods and services with the suppliers of those goods and services. It explores how the behavior of consumers (demanders), the behavior of producers (suppliers), and the level of market competition influence market outcomes. Lecture, Credits 3 (Fall, Spring)
Wellness Education 0
RIT recognizes the need for wellness education in today’s society and offers specifically designed courses to help students develop and maintain a well-balanced healthy lifestyle. The wellness education requirement is designed to assist students in making healthy decisions to support their academic and social interactions in college and beyond. The wellness curriculum provides learning experiences that are an integral part of the educational experience at RIT.
Summer 1st Year
Co-operative Work Experience NUTR 499 0
Required career related experience. Employment within the food and health industry monitored by the Office of Cooperative Education and approved by the faculty in the Nutrition Management program. Designed for the student to become exposed to career opportunities in the industry and gain skills and contacts essential to securing a dietetic internship and becoming a Registered Dietitian. Three co-ops are required for graduation and students typically complete them during the summer. Students must complete at least one co-op in a healthcare environment and at least one co-op in the food industry. Freshmen begin co-op the summer following their first year studies. Co-op, Credits 0 (Fall, Spring, Summer)
Second Year
Anatomy and Physiology I, Lab MEDS-250 4
This course is an integrated approach to the structure and function of the nervous, endocrine, integumentary, muscular and skeletal systems. Laboratory exercises include histological examination, actual and simulated anatomical dissections, and physiology experiments with human subjects. (Prerequisites: (BIOL-101 and BIOL-102) or (BIOL-121 and BIOL-122) or (1001-201 and 1001-202 and 1001-203) or (1001-251 and 1001-252 and 1001-253) or (MEDG- 102 or 1026-213) or NUTR-BS equivalent courses. CHST Multiple Course Prereq 18) Lab 3, Lecture 3, Credits 4 (Fall)
Sanitation and Safety FOOD-123 1
A discussion of current problems confronting the industry as a result of the most recent legislative developments as they relate to food safety and health around the globe. Material will focus on current regulations as per the latest Food Codes. Topics include Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point (HACCP) procedures, kitchen safety, and facility sanitation. Students will take the National Restaurant Association ServSafe Examination upon completion of the course and receive a ServSafe certificate if they score 75 or better. Lecture 1, Credits 1 (Spring)
Financial Accounting ACCT-110 3
An introduction to the way in which corporations report their financial performance to interested stakeholders such as investors and creditors. Coverage of the accounting cycle, generally accepted accounting principles, and analytical tools help students become informed users of financial statements. (This course is available to RIT degree-seeking undergraduate students.) Lecture, Credits 3 (Fall, Spring, Summer)
Foundations of Sociology SOCI-102 3
Sociology is the study of the social world and socialization processes. Sociologists study the broader picture of how societies are structured and organized through a macro-sociological analysis as well as how individuals create their own social reality symbolically through their interactions with others in a micro-sociological analysis. Students in this course will learn the fundamentals of each approach and come away with a sociological framework which they can critically apply to their own lives. Lecture, Credits 3 (Fall, Spring)
Anatomy and Physiology II, Lab MEDS-251 4
This course is an integrated approach to the structure and function of the gastrointestinal, cardiovascular, immunological, respiratory, excretory, and reproductive systems with an emphasis on the maintenance of homeostasis. Laboratory exercises include histological examinations, anatomical dissections and physiological experiments using human subjects. (Prerequisites: (BIOL-101 and BIOL-102) or (BIOL-121 and BIOL-122) or (1001-201 and 1001-202 and 1001- 203) or (1001-251 and 1001-252 and 1001-253) or (MEDG-102 or 1026-213) or NUTR-BS equivalent courses. CHST Multiple Course Prereq 18) Lab 3, Lecture 3, Credits 4 (Spring)
Food and Beverage Management FOOD-223 3
An introductory course covering the basic principles involved in the management of food and beverage operations. Topics include food and beverage marketing, menu planning, nutrition principles, staffing, food cost, production and preparation procedures, service and design. Both commercial and non-commercial food operations will be discussed. (HSPS-AAS/BS, NUTR- BSAAS) Lecture, Credits 3 (Spring)
Food and Beverage Management Lab NUTR-223 1
This course will provide direct, practical experience for Nutrition Management students in quantity foods development, production and service operations. Students will rotate through several positions within the RIT food service department and become exposed to the many activities that are required to run a large scale food operation. RIT’s food-service department will host Nutrition Management students for three hours each week as they are scheduled to work through various rotations in the department. This lab is taken in conjunction with the Food and Beverage Management course; FOOD-223. (Prerequisites: This class is restricted to students in the NUTR-BS program.Co-requisite: FOOD-223 or equivalent course.) Lab 3, Credits 1 (Spring)
Introduction to Statistics I STAT-145 3
This course will study the statistical methods of presenting and analyzing data. Topics covered include descriptive statistics and displays, random sampling, the normal distribution, confidence intervals, and hypothesis testing. The statistical software MINITAB is used to reinforce these principles and to introduce the use of technology in statistical analysis. This is a general introductory statistics course and is intended for a broad range of programs. Note: This course may not be taken for credit if credit is to be earned in STAT-205. (Prerequisite: MATH-101 or MATH-171 or MATH-181 or MATH-181A or a math placement exam (MPE) score greater than or equal to 55.) Lecture 3, Credits 3 (Fall, Spring, Summer)
General Education Immersion 1 3
Immersion is a series of three related general education courses. The student-selected nine credit hour requirement supports deeper learning within a focus area. In many cases, an immersion can lead to a Minor with the addition of two courses. All students need to declare an immersion.
General Education Perspective 1, 2 6
Perspective courses introduce the student to fundamentals of a liberal arts and sciences discipline (methods, concepts, and theories) while addressing specific general education learning outcomes. The student may select from a list of approved courses in each of the perspective disciplines.
Summer 2nd Year
Co-operative Work Experience NUTR 499 0
Required career related experience. Employment within the food and health industry monitored by the Office of Cooperative Education and approved by the faculty in the Nutrition Management program. Designed for the student to become exposed to career opportunities in the industry and gain skills and contacts essential to securing a dietetic internship and becoming a Registered Dietitian. Three co-ops are required for graduation and students typically complete them during the summer. Students must complete at least one co-op in a healthcare environment and at least one co-op in the food industry. Freshmen begin co-op the summer following their first year studies. Co-op, Credits 0 (Fall, Spring, Summer)
Third Year
Assessment of Service Quality HSPT-383 3
Quality is essential in all sectors of the economy, especially service and health care. The course lays a foundation for the use of quality tools and processes needed for improvement and innovation. The course teaches quality tools and processes which will be used in other HSPT courses (like Senior Project). Topics range from a general overview of quality systems (like TQM, QFD, and six sigma) to specific quality tools (like Pareto charts and activity network diagrams). The course sets the foundation for Senior Project (HSPT-490). (Prerequisites: STAT-145 or 1016- 301 or 1016-302 or equivalent course.) Lecture, Credits 3 (Fall, Spring)
Dietetic Environment NUTR-402 3
Introductory supervised practice /practicum course. This course explores the profession of dietetics which includes current dietetics practice as well as practice trends and career options. Students interact with a representative sampling of personnel in all areas of food and nutrition. Students will become familiar with current Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics Scope of Practice Framework, Standards of Professional Performance, and the Code of Ethics in the profession of Dietetics. The development of an outcome based professional portfolio is required. (Prerequisites: Restricted to students with at least 3rd year standing in NUTR-BS that have completed NUTR-125, 2 co-ops (NUTR-499, 0619-499, 0620-499) and all required sciences (CHMG-112, MEDS-250, MEDS-251, MEDG-106) or equivalent courses.) Lab 4, Lecture 2, Credits 3 (Fall)
Techniques of Dietetic Education NUTR-333 3
This course prepares Nutrition Management students to counsel and train clients and to give effective and persuasive presentations. Topics include communications methods, learner/ audience analysis, basic learning theory, developing counseling and training materials, as well as designing, making, and evaluating individual and group presentations. As part of the course each student is required to design and give a presentation and to design a self-training module/lesson. (Prerequisites: NUTR-125, MEDG-106, MEDS-250, MEDS-251 and CHMG-112 or equivalent courses.) Lecture 3, Credits 3 (Fall)
Principles of Marketing MKTG-230 3
An introduction to the field of marketing, stressing its role in the organization and society. Emphasis is on determining customer needs and wants and how the marketer can satisfy those needs through the controllable marketing variables of product, price, promotion and distribution. (This class is restricted to undergraduate students with at least 2nd year standing.) Lecture, Recitation, Credits 3 (Fall, Spring, Summer)
Life Cycle Nutrition NUTR-554 4
An applied course for the Nutrition Management major regarding the nutritional needs throughout the life cycle. Emphasis is given to nutrition during pregnancy, infancy, early childhood, adolescence, young and middle adulthood, and the elderly. Practicum in facilities delivering nutrition services to these age groups is required. Practicum hours by arrangement. (Prerequisites: Restricted to students with at least 3rd year standing in NUTR-BS that have completed NUTR-125, NUTR-402, 2 co-ops (NUTR-499, 0619-499, 0620-499) and all required sciences (CHMG-112, MEDS-250, MEDS-251, MEDG-106) or equivalent courses.) Lab 1, Lecture 3, Credits 4 (Spring)
Food Innovation and Development FOOD-325 3
Students will explore their creativity through instructor- and student-planned food experiments involving sensory and objective evaluation of food quality, recipe development, problem- solving, experimental design, and written and oral communication of research. Individual research projects focus on assessing new ingredients or technologies, creating new products, and/or evaluating the marketability of a new product. .***Fee: Lab fee associated with this course** (Prerequisites: FOOD-121 or equivalent course and 3rd year standing.) Lecture/Lab 6, Credits 3 (Fall, Spring)
Human Resources Development HRDE-386 3
A one-semester, three-credit course in human resource development provides the prospective manager practical information on methods to enhance the productivity, quality, and effectiveness of an organization through the creation of an environment where individual and collective performance and development has primacy. The course requires students to assimilate course material related to the following: to organizational strategy, systems thinking and legal compliance; workforce development, career development of employees; individual development and training; measuring outcomes; human resource processes and effective communications. Students integrate theoretical classroom concepts with practical knowledge and work experiences. As part of the course: students continually practice effective communication skills; students may work in teams; and are expected to engage in critical and innovative thinking. Students' understanding of human resource development is intended to help them enhance organizational effectiveness through implementing processes designed to develop and train employees.
General Education Immersion 2, 3 6
Immersion is a series of three related general education courses. The student-selected nine credit hour requirement supports deeper learning within a focus area. In many cases, an immersion can lead to a Minor with the addition of two courses. All students need to declare an immersion.
General Education Perspective 3 3
Perspective courses introduce the student to fundamentals of a liberal arts and sciences discipline (methods, concepts, and theories) while addressing specific general education learning outcomes. The student may select from a list of approved courses in each of the perspective disciplines.
Summer 3rd Year
Co-operative Work Experience NUTR 499 0
Required career related experience. Employment within the food and health industry monitored by the Office of Cooperative Education and approved by the faculty in the Nutrition Management program. Designed for the student to become exposed to career opportunities in the industry and gain skills and contacts essential to securing a dietetic internship and becoming a Registered Dietitian. Three co-ops are required for graduation and students typically complete them during the summer. Students must complete at least one co-op in a healthcare environment and at least one co-op in the food industry. Freshmen begin co-op the summer following their first year studies. Co-op, Credits 0 (Fall, Spring, Summer)
Fourth Year
Dietetic Internship Seminar NUTR-497 1
Provides the student applying to Dietetic Internships a process to make the task manageable. Students are provided timelines and assignments to step them through the application process which includes a personal statement/letter of application, resume, letters of reference, portfolio, site visits and interviews. The Internship application process is accomplished through the Dietetic Internship Centralized Application System (DICAS), and an independent centralized computer matching organization, D&D Digital (DND). (Co-requisite: NUTR-525 or equivalent course.) Lecture 1, Credits 1 (Fall)
Medical Nutrition Therapy I NUTR-525 3
This course is the first course of a two course series. Review and application of biological metabolism and interrelationships of nutrients, hormones, enzymes and other biochemical substances in humans. Modification of nutritional intake to meet nutritional needs altered by diseases and stress as well as use of alternate methods of feeding (enteral/parenteral) to meet nutritional needs is discussed in depth. This course emphasizes the practical applications of medical nutritional therapy for use with patients/clients. (Prerequisites: This course is restricted to 4th year students in NUTR-BS that have completed NUTR-125, NUTR-402, 2 co-ops (NUTR-499, 0619-499, 0620-499) and all required sciences (CHMG-112, MEDS-250, MEDS-251, MEDG-106) or equivalent courses.) Lecture 3, Credits 3 (Fall)
Senior Project (WI) NUTR-560 3
This is a capstone course requiring students to integrate the skills and knowledge from other courses by conducting research into an area of profession interest. The project incorporates gathering primary data, assessing and summarizing the data, and drawing conclusions from the data. Secondary goals include project management, working with organizations that will support the primary research, experiencing Human Subject Research (HSRO) processes, gathering secondary research, and meeting RIT’s Writing-Intensive-Program requirement. Credits 3 (Fall).
Nutrition and Complementary Medicine NUTR-510 1
This class offers students in the Nutrition Management major an overview of controversial and accepted alternative diet therapies, basic medicine guidelines, and vitamin/mineral supplementation. (Prerequisites: Restricted to students with at least 3rd year standing in NUTR-BS that have completed NUTR-125, 2 co-ops (NUTR-499, 0619-499, 0620-499) and all required sciences (CHMG-112, MEDS-250, MEDS-251, MEDG-106) or equivalent courses.) Lecture 1, Credits 1 (Fall)
General Education Perspective 4 3
Perspective courses introduce the student to fundamentals of a liberal arts and sciences discipline (methods, concepts, and theories) while addressing specific general education learning outcomes. The student may select from a list of approved courses in each of the perspective disciplines.
Free Electives 9
Any course outside of the Nutrition Management major can be taken as a free elective. Common free electives for Nutrition Management students include Sports Nutrition, Coaching Healthy Behaviors, Sports Physiology and Foods of the World.
Medical Nutrition Therapy II NUTR-526 3
This course is a continuation of NUTR-525 Medical Nutrition Therapy I. Review and application of biological metabolism and interrelationships of nutrients, hormones, enzymes and other biochemical substances in humans. Modification of nutritional intake to meet nutritional needs altered by diseases and stress as well as use of alternate methods of feeding (enteral/ parenteral) to meet nutritional needs is discussed in depth. This course emphasizes the practical applications of medical nutritional therapy for use with patients/clients. (Prerequisites: NUTR-525 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3, Credits 3 (Spring)
Community Nutrition NUTR-550 3
Study of current nutrition issues and delivery of food and nutrition services in the community. The course is designed to allow senior level students to acquire skills necessary to deliver services in the public health and private sector markets. Individual practicum in community facility is required and arranged by the instructor. All students will also participate in industry related research to identify innovative and effective delivery strategies for nutrition services and will have the opportunity to accomplish peer dissemination of their previously completed individual research project at an industry conference. (Prerequisites: NUTR-525 or equivalent course.) Lab 4, Lecture 2, Credits 3 (Spring)
Leadership in Hospitality and Service Industries HSPT-481 3
As future leaders in the hospitality and service industry students will be called upon to create innovative organizational forms that are flexible enough to change with the demand and information so essential for success. In this course students examine their style of leadership. It also examines how the values, beliefs, expectations and assumptions of the members of the organization affect the style of leadership that best suits the company. In addition students analyze current leadership theory and how people learn to progress effectively as future leaders in the hospitality and service industries. (This course is restricted to students with at least 3rd year standing in HSPS-BS.) Lecture, Credits 3 (Fall, Spring)
Total Semester Credit Hours 123
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