Courses Color page 4

 
 

Exercise 2: Boundaries
Where one color meets another color the two edges create a line. The line is referred to as a boundary line. The line will be soft or hard according to values, i.e. if the values are close, the boundary line will be soft; and if one value is dark and the other is soft, the boundary line will be hard.

1
Select six different hues with varying values, and from each, cut a swatch one by three-inches.

2
Without regard for hue or value, adhere the swatches butted against one another on the long dimension forming a rectangle six inches high.

3
Choose one hue at random and adhere it with the short end butted against the left end of the top swatch. This creates a one-inch boundary line.

4
Using all different hues, try to match the softness or hardness of that one-inch boundary line on the succeeding five divisions.

5
The final result is a six-inch square vertically divided in the middle, and having six horizontal divisions composed of twelve color swatches. The vertical center line should have the same degree of hardness or softness from top to bottom regardless of what hues or values are chosen.

6
Craft is an important criterion in evaluating this exercise.

 

Exercise 3: Transparency
1
Select a hue of approximately middle value and cut three three-inch squares which are put down on a horizontal line.

2
Select a second hue which contrasts with the first one, and cut three one and one-half-inch squares. Position the squares over one corner of the larger squares creating a one-inch overlap.

3
In the squares on the left, create the illusion of the smaller square being in front of the larger one by selecting a third, totally different, hue for the one by one-inch overlap. It is the boundary principle that determines what is in front and what is in back, not the choice of hue.

4
On the second set of squares, create the illusion of the larger and smaller squares merging.

5
On the far right set of squares, create the illusion of the larger square being in front of the smaller one.

6
Craft is an important criterion in evaluating this exercise.

 

Exercise 4: Color Manipulation
A common axiom in art has been warm colors advance and cool colors recede. Do a free-study and apply the boundary principle so that warm colors recede and cool colors advance. Size is optional. Sometimes students were asked to select one color and make it progressively recede through application of the boundary principle. Frame appropriately and craft is a consideration in evaluation.

 

Exercise 5: How Much to How Much
Select two hues that could be described as the ugliest possible color combination.

1
Do a free study with exactly the same amount of each color.

2
Do a free study making an exaggerated distinction between how much of one color to how much of the other appropriate framing and craft are a consideration in evaluation.

 

Exercise 6: Color Climate >

 

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Student example of Exercise 2: Boundaries

 

 

 


Student example of Exercise 3: Transparency

 

 

 

Student example of Exercise 4: Color Manipulation

 

 

 

 

Student example of Exercise 5: How Much to How Much

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