NTID Hosts Deaf Education Technology Symposium




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The widely known International Symposium-Instructional Technology and Education of the Deaf—will be held June 27-30 at the National Technical Institute for the Deaf (NTID), a college of Rochester Institute of Technology (RIT).

Formal and poster presentation proposals are being accepted for this conference, which serves people working with deaf and hard-of-hearing K-12 and college students. The conference benefits teachers, educational researchers, media and technical staff members, and administrators. Participants will learn information about current innovations and future developments in educational media and instructional technology.

Anyone interested in making a presentation should complete and return the Presentation Proposal Form located on the symposium Web page, by Feb. 4. Each presentation should address at least one of the following topics: technology supported learning, the impact of technology on teaching and learning, strategies for teachers to apply instructional technologies, and online and distance learning.

Early registration fee (before May 16) for the symposium is $225, otherwise $275; students pay $125. There will be several half-day post-symposium workshops on June 29. Registration fee for those is $75. For the full-day workshops on June 30, registration is $150.

The symposium is co-sponsored by NTID, The Nippon Foundation of Japan, and the Postsecondary Education Network International (PEN-International).

For more information or to register, visit www.rit.edu/~techsym, or contact E. William Clymer, symposium chairperson, by phone at 585-475-6894 (voice/tty) or email techsym@rit.edu.

NTID is the first and largest technological college in the world for deaf and hard-of-hearing students. NTID, one of eight colleges of RIT, offers educational programs and access and support services to its 1,100 students from around the world who study, live, and socialize with 14,000 hearing students on RIT's Rochester, N.Y., campus.