Legacy scholarship for grandson celebrates grandfather’s military service

Student Spotlight
James Reynolds, third-year chemical engineering




Follow RITNEWS on Twitter

201211/jamesw_ltdupuisaward2.jpg

Michelle Cometa

Lt. Gerald Dupuis, retired, U.S. Navy, right, who served onboard the guided missile cruiser USS Little Rock, presented James Reynolds the USS Little Rock Association Legacy Scholarship in a ceremony at the Kate Gleason College of Engineering.

When James Reynolds received the USS Little Rock Association Legacy Scholarship this past month in a ceremony at RIT, he shared the day with his grandfather, James A. Reynolds. It was an especially moving event, because the third-year chemical engineering student in the Kate Gleason College of Engineering received a special legacy scholarship given to family members of those who served on board the historic ship.

“I think this is a terrific way of honoring the legacy,” says Steve Wienstein, department head of the chemical engineering department who attend the ceremony. “What better way to celebrate the kind of freedom being fought for than to have a grandson get a scholarship award and watching him progress in the freedom that was secured for us in the past.”

Question: Where are you from?
Answer: Oswego, N.Y.

Q: What brought you to RIT?
A: I was attracted to RIT because RIT has a well-respected engineering program and also has a co-op program allowing me to get real-work experience before I graduate.

Q: What was so special about the USS Little Rock Scholarship you won and how will you use it?
A: It was special because of where it came from. My grandfather has always encouraged me to continue my education, and now thanks to his service and dedication to his country, I will be able to use the scholarship to further my education.

Q: What was it like to share the day with your grandfather? Had he shared any of his experiences about serving on the USS Little Rock?
A: It meant a lot to share this day with my grandfather and the rest of my family because they have done so much to help me get where I am, and it was nice to let them know that their hard work had paid off. Ever since I was little, I had been aware of my grandfather’s service aboard the USS Little Rock. I had always been fascinated by his stories, pictures and ribbons, and as I grew older I gained more and more of an appreciation of what he had done.

Q: What is the most unique thing about you?
A: I enjoy playing every sport I can, especially soccer.

Q: What is your favorite RIT moment?
A: My favorite moments at RIT would be the friendships I have made that I hope will last a lifetime.

Q: What advice would you give other students at RIT?
A: If you work hard and dedicate yourself, you can achieve any goal, academic or otherwise.

Q: What are your plans after graduation?
A: After graduation I plan to either enter the work force or continue on and get my master’s degree.

Compiled by Michelle Cometa.

Matt Gregory compiles “Student Spotlights” for University News. Contact him at msg2110@rit.edu with suggestions.

201211/jamesw_ltdupuisaward2.jpg

Michelle Cometa

Lt. Gerald Dupuis, retired, U.S. Navy, right, who served onboard the guided missile cruiser USS Little Rock, presented James Reynolds the USS Little Rock Association Legacy Scholarship in a ceremony at the Kate Gleason College of Engineering.

201211/navyscholarshipacasual.jpg

Michelle Cometa

James A. Reynolds, seated, served onboard the USS Little Rock in the late 1940s. His grandson, James Reynolds, third from right, received a scholarship from the USS Little Rock Association to put toward his studies.