Monthly Archives: March 2016

RIT/NTID featured in Syracuse Post-Standard story on Rochester’s Deaf community

two students working in the Deaf Studies Lab with laptop in front of them and others behind.

The Syracuse Post-Standard’s Empire Magazine featured a cover story on Rochester’s vibrant Deaf community, including RIT/NTID. The multimedia story included a still photography slide show and video and featured several RIT/NTID students, faculty, staff and administrators, who discussed the high employment rate of RIT/NTID graduates; the growth of a “deaf middle class” in Rochester; the availability of deaf professionals in a variety of fields, including medicine, dentistry and more; and the willingness of hearing Rochestarians to learn sign language and engage with their deaf and hard-of-hearing neighbors and colleagues. The article refers to Rochester as a “tremendous model.”

 

Providing cyber security training and job opportunities for deaf and hard-of-hearing RIT students

female student with glasses working on computer next to male student with other students and computers in background

While most RIT students are sleeping late and enjoying some free time during spring break, 23 deaf and hard-of-hearing students are participating in a rigorous, week-long training designed to provide them with experience in the rapidly growing field of computer forensics.

The first-of-its-kind Computer Forensics Boot Camp for deaf and hard-of-hearing students held March 21-24 at Rochester Institute of Technology’s National Technical Institute for the Deaf, provides 32 hours of training toward EnCase certification – the standard in cyber forensics.

The boot camp is the brainchild of RIT/NTID alumnus Scott Van Nice, systems manager, Forensics Information Security, Cyber Security – Threat Intel at Procter & Gamble, who has been on campus throughout the week. Van Nice connected with fellow RIT alumnus and president and CEO of Guidance Software Patrick Dennis, whose company is providing the training and who visited campus Tuesday. Procter & Gamble, Guidance Software and Ernst & Young are major sponsors of the boot camp.

Students were selected based on their high GPAs and majors related to the cyber forensics area such as Networking and Systems Administration, Criminal Justice, Human Computer Interaction and Computer Science.

“We are incredibly grateful to Guidance Software, Procter & Gamble, Ernst & Young, and all of the companies involved in making this boot camp a reality for our students,” said Gerry Buckley, NTID president and RIT vice president and dean. “Patrick, Scott and their companies recognize the importance of diversity and inclusion in all phases of business. The students attending the boot camp represent some of RIT/NTID’s best and brightest, and they are eager to take advantage of this outstanding opportunity for training.”

Computer forensics, sometimes known as cyber forensics or cyber security, is a field that is becoming increasingly more important to companies of all sizes.  According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, “The proliferation of criminal activity on the Internet, such as identity theft, spamming, e-mail harassment and illegal downloading of copyrighted materials, will increase the demand for private investigators. Opportunities are expected to be excellent for computer forensic investigators.”

Throughout the week, students have been in classroom training from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., breaking for lunches and dinners featuring keynote presentations by Van Nice, Dennis and others. A career night for program participants Wednesday evening featured networking opportunities with representatives from companies including Prudential, JP Morgan Chase, the CIA, Cisco, Comcast, Procter & Gamble and Ernst & Young.  

Rebecca Kingman joins RIT/NTID

Rebecca Kingman with glasses, long hair, blue shirt and gold cross necklace

Rebecca Kingman of Hamilton, New Jersey, has joined the staff at Rochester Institute of Technology’s National Technical Institute for the Deaf as an audiologist in the Communication Studies and Services Department.

Kingman has a long history of working in the audiology field. She has worked as a graduate clinician at Gallaudet University’s Hearing and Speech Center, then interned at The Listening Center at John Hopkins Hospital and with Michael Mass and Associates and Professional Hearing Services before joining RIT/NTID as an extern in 2014. She currently is serving on the Vision Support Committee and is helping run the Eye and Ear, Nose and Throat Clinics on campus.

She earned her bachelor’s degree in speech and hearing from Elmira College in 2011. In 2013 she earned her master’s degree in hearing, speech and language sciences from Gallaudet University. Kingman received her Au.D. in audiology in 2015 from Gallaudet University. She currently is working on her Ph.D. in hearing, speech, and language sciences, which she expects in 2017.

RIT Men’s Hockey NCAA East Regional Tournament Information

RIT hockey players on the ice with american flag in the stands

The NCAA East Regional Division I Men’s Ice Hockey Championships will take place this weekend, March 26 and 27, at the Times Union Center in Albany, New York. RIT will face top seed Quinnipiac at 4 p.m. eastern Saturday. 

A limited number of discounted alumni tickets are available. These tickets are located in an official RIT section (124) and feature access to our alumni pre-game reception at the Times Union Center 1:00 p.m. – 3:30 p.m. These discounted, single-game tickets for the game and reception on Saturday, are only $50 (regular single game tickets alone are currently $45 plus service fee). To register for the alumni pre-game reception, click HERE.  

RIT Weekend Pass Availability
There are a limited number of weekend pass tickets located in RIT section(s) available through the Gene Polisseni Center box office. These weekend pass tickets will be $80 for adults and $40 for RIT students and are available Tuesday, March 22nd and Wednesday March 23rd from 10am to 6pm as well as Thursday, March 24th from 10am to 4pm, pending all tickets being sold. You may purchase weekend pass tickets at the box office either in person or over the telephone at 585.475.4121. No single game tickets will be sold at the RIT box office, they are available through the venue only (Times Union Center). Tickets bought through the venue WILL NOT be in the RIT section(s). 

Cheer on the Tigers In Rochester!
The official RIT Alumni Viewing Parties for Rochester, NY, will take place at the Gene Polisseni Center and Jeremiah’s Tavern on Monroe Ave. For details, click HERE.

Gather with alumni around the world!
An updated list of Alumni Viewing Parties can be found HERE. If you are getting together with alumni in your area to watch the game(s), let us know where! We’ll post the information on the RIT Alumni website and our Facebook & Twitter feeds so more alumni can join you. Email us today and tell us where you’re watching the game(s).

Follow the action on Facebook & Twitter!
Become a fan of RIT Men’s Hockey on Facebook or Twitter and receive the latest updates on the team and news about this weekend’s festivities.

Broadcast Information
In the Rochester-area, ESPNU is digital cable channel 370. For those outside of Rochester, please check with your local cable or satellite provider for channel information.

Visit the RIT Athletics website to keep up to date. 

Go Tigers!

 

RIT/NTID researchers receive $450K grant for longitudinal study of vision in deaf children

Matt Dye in glasses, tan sweater, plaid shirt and tie standing with Peter Hauser in glasses, grey shirt and dark tie w/dots

Does being born deaf lead to better visual skills, or does a lack of hearing make it difficult for deaf children to pay attention to the world around them? According to researchers at Rochester Institute of Technology’s National Technical Institute for the Deaf, who recently earned a $450,000 National Science Foundation grant, the answer often depends on the background of the deaf child being studied.

The NSF award, which will be distributed over three years, will support a longitudinal study of 150 deaf children, ages 6 to 13, attending schools for the deaf around the United States. The research team, led by Matthew Dye, assistant professor in NTID’s Department of Liberal Studies, and Peter Hauser, professor and director of NTID’s Deaf Studies Laboratory, hopes to prove that deaf children who learn American Sign Language (ASL) early in life look at the world differently compared to deaf children who receive a cochlear implant and use a spoken language such as English. They also hope to learn whether it is a lack of hearing or the age at which they are exposed to a natural language that most influences how deaf children perceive the world.

Through assessments of each child’s hearing levels, cognitive skills and fluency in ASL, the scientists will determine how well these variables predict deaf children’s improvements in processing visual information. Research will also focus on how well deaf children can shift their focus of attention from one thing to another, or temporal visual attention. Using a set of iPad games, deaf children will be asked to look for targets in fast-moving streams of visual information or pick out important sequences.

“Many people think that being born deaf leads to deficits in the ability to understand information that is presented sequentially,” said Dye. “However, previous research has failed to dissociate loss of hearing from exposure to language. In this study, we want to see whether early exposure to ASL can enhance sequence processing in deaf students.”

Dye has said past studies have looked only at deaf children born to deaf parents, and who learned ASL when they were infants. Other studies have looked only at deaf children born to hearing parents, who do not learn ASL and use speech to communicate alongside digital hearing aids or cochlear implants.

“The visual attention system consists of different cognitive networks; language and hearing levels appear to have a positive effect on some, but not all, aspects of the network,” Hauser explained. “These findings have been based on comparing deaf individuals of different ages and backgrounds. With this grant funding, it is exciting that we now can follow the same deaf children over a period of time to observe how early language experience may lead to these changes.”

Jeannette Vargas receives Outstanding Advisor Award

Jeannette Vargas receives Outstanding Advisor Award

Jeannette Vargas, senior staff specialist, development and alumni relations at NTID, was awarded the Outstanding Advisor Award by the Center for Campus Life, Fraternity and Sorority Life. She was nominated by the brothers of Lambda Alpha Upsilon Fraternity, one of RIT’s Latino fraternities, to honor the work she has done with the group. She has been the fraternity’s advisor as well as the advisor for NTID’s Latin American Deaf Club for 20 years.