Monthly Archives: July 2016

RIT/NTID celebrates growing number of Ph.D. candidates

Madeline Beach in black cap and gown with pink lei around her neck standing next to Peter Hauser in blue cap and gown at podium

Rochester Institute of Technology’s National Technical Institute for the Deaf is honoring deaf and hard-of-hearing graduates who will continue on to earn doctoral degrees in science, technology, engineering or mathematics (STEM) disciplines.

Four RIT/NTID students were enrolled in the Rochester Bridges to the Doctorate program— in partnership with University of Rochester and funded by a grant from the National Institute for General Medical Science—that is helping to fill the gap that exists when it comes to deaf and hard-of-hearing students earning doctoral degrees in science disciplines.

Up to three graduate students are selected each year for entry into the Bridges program. Most of their tuition is paid, and they also earn experience—and a paycheck—working in laboratories at RIT and UR. Throughout the program, they meet regularly with mentors who help prepare them for the academic rigors of earning a doctorate, attend at least two professional conferences and complete three research rotations at UR laboratories.

“We are proud of the accomplishments of these students, who are advancing toward their doctoral degrees and making meaningful contributions to scholarly research,” said Dr. Gerard Buckley, NTID president and RIT vice president and dean. “They are role models for deaf and hard-of-hearing undergraduate students interested in STEM disciplines.”

            The students being honored through the Bridges to the Doctorate program:
            • Lorne Farovitch (Vancouver, Wash.), graduated with a master’s degree in environmental science and will attend University of Rochester Medical Center to earn a Ph.D. in translational biomedical science.
            • Madeline Beach (Aurora, Ill.), graduated with a master’s degree in applied statistics and will attend Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis to earn a Ph.D. in biostatistics.
            • Jessica Contreras (Eagle River, Alaska), graduated with a master’s degree in experimental psychology and will attend the University of Connecticut to earn a Ph.D. in developmental psychology.
            • Gloria Wink (Rochester, N.Y.) graduated with a master’s degree in environmental science and will attend University of Rochester Medical Center to earn a Ph.D. in epidemiology.

Other RIT/NTID graduates who are continuing on to earn advanced degrees:
            • Natalie Snyder (Rockville, Md.) graduated with a bachelor’s degree in biomedical science, with minors in exercise science and psychology, and will attend University of Maryland Eastern Shore to earn a Doctor of Physical Therapy degree.
            • Courtney Kellogg (Lake Waukomis, Mo.) graduated with a master’s degree in chemistry and will attend University of Rochester Medical Center to earn a Ph.D. in Pathways of Human Disease.
For more information about the Bridges to the Doctorate program, go to http://deafscientists.com/

Gaining Business Knowledge on Co-op

Female student with Caterpillar heavy equipment in the background

Marlet Mancera’s co-op experience as a corporate accounting intern at Caterpiller taught her many things among which are that employers value excellence, commitment and teamwork. Her RIT courses helped her develop skills in Microsoft Office, Excel and other software related to her business and accounting interests. She is sure that her business administrations degree and accounting training will guide her to a successful future. 

EYF offers students something new

Two students doing a lab experiment

Deaf and hard-of-hearing students from all over the country attend Explore Your Furutre each year and enjoy hands-on experiences with various careers. This summer camp also gives participants a taste of college life and the opportunity to make new friends. On the final day of camp, a parent workshop offers families the chance to ask questions about admissions and financial aid as well as take a campus tour. More

RIT/NTID names Robert Pollard associate dean for research

Robert Pollard in button-down windowpane shirt and red patterned tie.

Robert Pollard has been named associate dean for research for the National Technical Institute for the Deaf at Rochester Institute of Technology.

Pollard will work with NTID President and RIT Vice President and Dean Gerry Buckley, and others, to further NTID’s position as the preeminent national and international center regarding evidence-based research in the field of deafness on teaching and learning; communication/language and literacy; communication technology/access and support services; and employment and adaptability to social change in the global workplace. In addition to providing leadership for research at NTID and playing a key role in shaping and expanding NTID’s emerging research agenda, Pollard actively will participate in obtaining and managing grants and serve as a member of NTID’s leadership team.

“I am honored to be embarking on this next step in my career at NTID, an institution where I’ve had many affiliations, and enjoyed the company of many colleagues, since I interned there in 1983 and 1984,” said Pollard. “As associate dean for research, I will devote all of the talents and resources at my disposal to facilitate continued growth and excellence of the broad research enterprise at NTID.”

Pollard comes to NTID from University of Rochester’s School of Medicine where he is a professor of psychiatry and serves as founder and director of the Department of Psychiatry’s Deaf Wellness Center. His work has been recognized with many national and international awards and honors, and he has been principal investigator on more than 50 federal, foundation, regional and local grants, totaling more than $6 million. He has published more than 90 articles and book chapters, and has produced 15 films in American Sign Language.

Pollard’s research interests include psychopathology, psychological testing, sign language interpreting, forensic evaluation, intimate partner violence, and public health issues affecting the deaf population. He is active in several national organizations, including the American Psychological Association where he founded a special interest section on deafness.

“Bob is a highly respected researcher who has performed truly impactful work with Rochester’s deaf community and beyond,” says Buckley. “We are looking forward to his collaboration with RIT/NTID researchers and students who continue to do remarkable work in their fields.” 

RIT included in “Fiske Guide to Colleges 2017”

Aerial photo of RIT's sustainability building, four stories high with a red brick and glass exterior

Rochester Institute of Technology has again been named in the “Fiske Guide to Colleges,” one of only 26 private and 21 public universities included in the 2017 edition. The guide highlights RIT’s position as a leader in providing access services for deaf and hard-of-hearing students through its National Technical Institute for the Deaf and its focus on career-oriented and technology-based academics. More.

New scholarship benefits deaf, hard-of-hearing students at RIT/NTID

Mike Lawson in dark suit and tie standing with mom on left in yellow top and plaid skirt and dad on right in brown suit and tie.

RIT’s National Technical Institute for the Deaf has announced the Michael E. Lawson Endowed Scholarship, which will be implemented for the 2016-17 academic year. Lawson was a former RIT men’s soccer standout and assistant coach who was inducted into the RIT Athletics Hall of Fame in 2012.
 
The Lawson scholarship will support deaf and hard-of-hearing students in the College of Liberal Arts and in NTID’s Master of Science in Secondary Education program. At minimum, two awards will be made annually, one to a student in each the College of Liberal Arts and the MSSE program. The Lawson family generously gifted the funds to establish the scholarship.
 
“I am extremely proud to be part of establishing this scholarship for deserving young deaf and hard-of-hearing men and women,” said Lawson, who is a teacher of deaf and hard-of-hearing students at Neptune Middle School in Neptune, NJ. “I hope that the scholarship will provide an opportunity for them to have the same kinds of positive experiences that I had as a student at RIT/NTID.” 
 
Named the RIT Senior Male Athlete of the Year in 2006, Lawson enjoyed an excellent career with the Tigers, starting all 71 games 2002-05, posting 40 points from his midfield position on 13 goals and 14 assists. Eleven of his 13 career goals were game-winners, fourth all-time at the university.
 
Lawson was a four-time All-Empire 8 selection, earning Player of the Year honors in 2004 and 2005. He was also league Rookie of the Year in 2002. Lawson helped guide the Tigers to the 2004 Empire 8 Championship and a berth in the NCAA Tournament. He was also a 2004 National Soccer Coaches Association of America Adidas First Team All-Region selection.
 
“The importance of scholarship support for deserving deaf and hard-of-hearing students at RIT/NTID cannot be overstated,” said Gerard Buckley, NTID president and RIT vice president and dean. “We are so grateful to the Lawson family for their generous gift in honor of their son, Michael, who continues to serve as a role model to our deaf and hard-of-hearing student-athletes.”
 
A three-year team captain, Lawson was a two-time NSCAA Scholar All-American in 2004 and 2005. As an undergraduate, Lawson, an NTID student, maintained a 3.64 grade point average as a social work major. In his graduate studies, he had a 3.90 GPA in deaf education.
 
Lawson served as an assistant coach for the RIT men’s soccer program under head coach Bill Garno 2006-08.
 
Please contact Bryan Hensel, NTID Development at Bryan.Hensel@rit.edu for information on how you can make a gift to the fund.

RIT/NTID’s Catherine Clark selected as finalist in 2016 Oticon Focus On People awards

headshot of Catherine Clark in light blue suit with white lace shirt and blue earrings.

Catherine Clark, audiologist and faculty member at Rochester Institute of Technology’s National Technical Institute for the Deaf, is among the outstanding hearing care professionals selected as a finalist in 2016 Oticon Focus on People Awards, a national competition that celebrates individuals who are helping to eliminate negative stereotypes of what it means to have a hearing loss. Clark is one of three outstanding individuals selected as a finalist in the Practitioner category. People can cast their vote for Clark at www.oticon.com. Total number of votes will help determine whether she is the first, second or third place winner in the national awards competition. 

Throughout her career, Clark has actively promoted and served as a positive role model for diversity, pluralism and inclusion. Her contributions to enhance the inclusiveness of deaf and hard-of-hearing people are significant. She established the Cochlear Implant program at RIT/NTID that is accessible to more than 430 students, working tirelessly to help students become advocates for their hearing needs.

In addition to providing free hearing screenings to the Urban Outreach Project, she has served with the Rochester Black Deaf Advocates and on the Executive Board of the Rochester School for the Deaf. She also volunteered as a Junior Achievement Educator.  Clark has published extensively and spoken at national and international conferences on inclusiveness, diversity and pluralism. She was recently honored by the non-profit Visions for her service trips to Ethiopia where she provides audiological service and hearing aids.

Website visitors are encouraged to read all of the stories from this year’s 12 finalists in four categories: Student, Adult, Advocacy and Practitioner. 

Voting closes on August 15. Winners will be announced in September.

RIT/NTID appoints Mary Karol Matchett as assistant vice president for student and academic services

Mary Karol Matchett with blonde hair pulled back and bangs, wearing glasses, necklace blue jacket and red shirt.

Mary Karol Matchett, of Brighton, N.Y., has been named assistant vice president for student and academic services at Rochester Institute of Technology’s National Technical Institute for the Deaf.

Matchett will provide direction and oversight for a number of NTID programs and services, including the Counseling and Academic Advising Services Department, Student Life Team, Summer Vestibule Program, First-Year Experiences and Career Exploration Studies programs, NTID Psychological Services and Substance and Alcohol Intervention Services for the Deaf, NTID’s Title IX deputy/liaison, and NTID Financial Services and Student Scholarships.

Matchett will also serve as a member of NTID’s senior leadership group, the NTID Administrative Council, and will report to NTID’s associate vice president for academic affairs. She will be responsible for ensuring that students receive appropriate academic support services through collaboration between faculty and staff across departments. She also will work closely with RIT’s vice president for student affairs to ensure that NTID student needs are represented across the university.

“Mary Karol’s experience as an RIT/NTID student, admissions counselor and parent makes her uniquely qualified to bridge our students’ academic and social success,” said Gerard Buckley, NTID president and RIT vice president and dean. “Her energy, enthusiasm and knowledge of the factors that contribute to the development of well-rounded students will be invaluable in this role.”

Matchett earned a bachelor’s degree in social work at RIT, Master of Social Work degree at Syracuse University and doctorate in executive leadership at St. John Fisher College. She previously served as interim chair of counseling and academic advising services at NTID and prior to that, as special assistant for student success, focusing on RIT/NTID retention efforts.