For Instructors

The student has no Disability Service Agreement (DSA) and said they had special services in high school, how do I respond?

 

The student has no Disability Services Agreement (DSA), should I make allowances anyway?

 

How can I invite dialogue with students who have additional disabilities?

 

I suspect a student has a possible disability, can I ask them?

 

What are "appropriate" accommodations?

 

Do I have to modify my expectations for a student with an additional disability?

 

What if a student presents their DSA many weeks into the quarter/semester?

 

What if a student requests accommodation the day of the test?

 

There is a problem with the note taker, the quality of notes, the close vision/tactile interpreter, or scribe in my classroom?

 

 

 

 

 

The student has no Disability Service Agreement (DSA) and said they had special services in high school, how do I respond?

 

Refer them to their NTID counselor or to the Disability Services Office to discuss how to request and determine if they might be eligible for accommodations.

 

 

The student has no Disability Services Agreement (DSA), should I make allowances anyway?

 

It is not recommended that you offer accommodations without a Disability Service Agreement (DSA) from the student.

 

 

How can I invite dialogue with students who have additional disabilities?

 

Ideally, on the first day of class or again during the quarter/semester as needed, you can make an announcement to your class and post in your syllabus, "RIT is committed to providing reasonable accommodations to students with disabilities. If you would like to request accommodations such as test modifications due to a disability, contact the Disability Services Office. It is located in the Student Alumni Union, Room 1150. After you are approved for accommodations or if you already have a DSA (Disability Service Agreement), please see me during office hours to discuss your accommodations."

 

 

I suspect a student has a possible disability, can I ask them?

 

Students have the right to keep their disability information confidential; they only need to discuss their accommodations with you and how to implement them in your classroom.

 

Note: Some students may have a disability and have approved accommodations but may choose not to request those accommodations for your class.

 

 

What are "appropriate" accommodations?

 

You are only required to follow accommodations listed on the Disability Services Agreement (DSA). You’re not required to be a special education teacher in terms of teaching a person how to read, or modifying the content and the curriculum to fit a student with additional disabilities. If you have a group of students without additional disabilities in your class, with a low reading level for example, you might choose different materials or write up your assignments or testing in a different manner. That is just good teaching.

 

 

Do I have to modify my expectations for a student with an additional disability?

 

No. The student has to be otherwise qualified, which means disability or not, they have to be able to do the work. They should be able to do the work with their accommodations.

 

 

What if a student presents their DSA many weeks into the quarter/semester?

 

This could happen if they never requested accommodations until that time or never completed all the paperwork until then. You are obligated to offer the accommodations listed on the DSA at any time during the quarter/semester, as long as the request allows you a reasonable amount of time to make required arrangements as needed.

 

 

What if a student requests accommodation the day of the test?

 

If a student comes to you that morning and the test is in one hour and says that they need accommodations, you will have to decide if it is reasonable, given that short notice. If you can do it, fine, if not, tell them that the logistics of this is not going to work today and you can make these accommodations for the next test. That might be difficult to say but it is reasonable and realistic given the situation. You can try to be accommodating, but sometimes it is not realistic.

 

 

There is a problem with the note taker, the quality of notes, the close vision/tactite interpreter, or scribe in my classroom?

 

Share your concern with the student. The student can go to http://myaccess.rit.edu and report the problem and/or contact the Disability Services Office.

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Phone: 585-475-6400 Last updated on Feb 26, 2014