Raising and Educating a Deaf Child

International experts answer your questions about the choices, controversies, and decisions faced by the parents and educators of deaf and hard-of-hearing children.

Question from M.M., Massachussetts

How do I get public school to pay for an outside comprehensive evaluation for my 5 year old hard-of-hearing child. Her three-year IEP is coming up. The school does not have personnel trained on hearing loss to do the testing, but they argue that they have the right to do their own testing. Please advise.

Question from M.M., Massachussetts. Posted April 23, 2014.
Response from Louis Abbate - President Emeritus, Willie Ross School for the Deaf

In order for an appropriate IEP to be developed there must be evaluations conducted by the school district using licensed or approved staff. I would suggest that you put your request in writing and include that the fact that because the district does not employ staff trained to conduct such an evaluation for a child with a hearing loss an outside evaluation is needed.  Remember that your child is entitled to an Independent Evaluation (known as an IEE ) and the district must comply. Include in your request the particular evaluations that you wish to be conducted outside the district.

As for payment, there are different avenues for you to consider. First, you may, but are not required to, share the cost with the district. This option would mean that you would have to share financial information with the district. Second, if you are income eligible, the district will cover the full cost of having the evaluation conducted. Third, you can agree to pay for it yourself.

While it is hard to imagine how a three-year review could be conducted without this information, I would recommend that you make clear in your request that in order for your child’s services to be developed, evaluations must be conducted by qualified staff and, as it is a three-year review, the evaluations must produce the needed information to develop the new IEP.

Parent rights for IEEs are detailed in the federal special education law known as The Individuals with Disabilities Education Act, and those rights along with your state provides for parents can be accessed on the Department of Education’s web site in the state where you live. Finally, if the initial evaluation conducted on your child included an evaluation by an audiologist and your child uses assistive listening equipment, it is not likely that an appropriate IEP can be developed without having this type of evaluation being conducted as well.