Raising and Educating a Deaf Child

International experts answer your questions about the choices, controversies, and decisions faced by the parents and educators of deaf and hard-of-hearing children.

Question from G.R. – Somewhere USA

I have a 6 year old daughter who has a severe loss, and who identifies as Deaf. She is being declassified as deaf for being at grade level. That is, she currently has an interpreter during the school day except at lunch and has been getting 80 minutes a day instruction (pull out) from a teacher of the deaf and speech therapy 2 days a week speech individually and 1 day a week in a group. The school now wants her to receive only 40 minutes a day from the teacher of the deaf and speech therapy in a group once a week. My daughter works very hard to be at grade level, and the school won’t take in account that this is why she is doing so well. How do we make them understand that she still needs services. Perhaps some kind of assessments can help with this? We’ve already had speech, learning and psychological assessments.

Question from G.R. – Somewhere USA. Posted October 8, 2015.
Response from Jennifer Lukomski - Rochester Institute of Technology

It sounds like the school is not declassifying the your daughter but decreasing services. Yes, they can do that if they have data that indicates that she is currently successful in learning. It sounds like they what to see if she can be successful with 40 hours instead of 80 hours of ToD services. Unfortunately, IDEA is not in place to ensure that all children excel. Instead, IDEA’s role is to ensure a free and appropriate education, which means to ensure that the student has the opportunity passes and does not fail. At this point the school will need to monitor your daughter’s progress carefully. Her services may nor may not increase based on the progress she makes. Perhaps an outside evaluator who specializes in deaf and hard-of-hearing issues can build a case for additional services.

Although you do not indicate anything about the results of the assessments that already have been conducted, the implication is that they have not supported the case you are trying to make. That may give the school support for a “trial” with reduced services. However, the test or assessment is only as good as the person who is administering and interpreting the results. If this was not the case previously, perhaps it would help to find a person in the area who specializes in deaf and hard-of-hearing issues – the School for the Deaf in your state likely offers such services or can provide recommendations. The point is that a specialist in the field of deaf and hard-of-hearing issues will be able to place the findings in context and build a rationale for the services that are necessary. For example, memory is an important component of any assessment with regards to reading. The other piece that is important as mentioned is progress monitoring. Does the school have a Response to Intervention system set-up? Do they use Dibels or AimsWeb to track the child’s progress. It may turn out that these changes do not affect your daughter’s performance, but if you can’t prevent the change, you need to ensure that the school is carefully monitoring progress.