Raising and Educating a Deaf Child

International experts answer your questions about the choices, controversies, and decisions faced by the parents and educators of deaf and hard-of-hearing children.

Question from U.D., India

My 8 yr old daughter has sensorineural profound deafness. She’s using hearing aids and is at par with her hearing friends in mainstream education. She’s a bright child with immense understanding and grasping power. English has been her second language here, her first language was her mother tongue.
We are relocating to USA this year. Her language skills in English are comparatively low, say 30-40% of a hearing child in US. I would like to know the basic expectations of school from her so that I can make her understand the needs and prepare her accordingly. Likewise, what will be the process to take her admission in mainstream education school?

Question from U.D., India. Posted May 18, 2016.
Response from Jessica Trussell - NTID

Depending on where you move in the United States, there are two services I would seek. First, the staff at the school will need to meet with you to decide if your daughter is eligible for special education services. During that meeting, the school will review your child’s hearing levels from her audiogram and her school performance up to this point. If they request to do any testing, ask them to complete the testing in her first language and in English. This will give the school team an idea of how to proceed with her education. If you believe that support from a teacher who specializes in working with children who have a hearing loss would benefit your daughter, let the school know that you want a teacher of the deaf and hard of hearing at the meetings. A teacher of the deaf and hard of hearing has been trained to work with children who have different types of hearing loss and who communicate in different ways. This teacher can work with the school and the classroom teacher to make sure that your daughter is getting the education she has a right to under the US law. Second, I would ask the school for access to a teacher who specializes in teaching students who are learning English as another language. This teacher will have been trained specifically to work with students who have first languages other than English. This teacher along with the teacher of the deaf and hard of hearing can work with the mainstream or general education classroom teacher to make sure that your daughter’s education is optimized. In my personal opinion, this team of teachers bringing their knowledge together would be a great start for your child.