Raising and Educating a Deaf Child

International experts answer your questions about the choices, controversies, and decisions faced by the parents and educators of deaf and hard-of-hearing children.

Question from Z.D., South Africa

What is the role of a speech therapist in communication development of a 7-year-old deaf child using sign language?

Question from Z.D., South Africa. Posted October 27, 2011.
Response from Linda J. Spencer - New Mexico State University

The role of a speech therapist or the speech-language pathologist (SLP) in the case of a 7 year-old deaf child using sign language  is intrinsic and multi-faceted.  The clinician must be aware of the implications of the type of sign-language being used.  If the child is using American Sign Language (ASL) then there will be bilingual issues to be addressed when it comes to teaching reading, because the child must learn English to read.  The SLP can facilitate learning English Grammar forms in preparation for reading and writing in English whether the sign system used is a contrived system such as Signed English, or ASL.

There are also many things that can be done with both spoken phonology (sounds of the language) that can contribute to the ability to decode printed words (phonological awareness and phonological processing).  In fact, just because a child is using sign language, this does not rule out that using voice to communicate might be a goal.  The child may want to target high use words and phrases for speaking.   Children who are deaf also may need to target “pragmatics” or the practical use of language in social contexts. It is the proverbial “knowing what to say, how to say it, and when to say it – and how to “be” with other people.”  Because deaf children do not always “overhear” social niceties, they may need to be taught these things directly (e.g., we don’t typically ask grown-ups their age, or even if you do not care for a particuar gift you get it would be impolite to say “I don’t like this!” ).

Other areas the SLP may target is helping the child to increase vocabulary, (especially multiple meaning words), learning idiomatic language “put the lights out.” In summary one of the key elements to your question is the word “language. ”  The role of the SLP is to facilitate speech and language learning in all contexts and modalities appropriate for the individual.