NIH grant provides postdoctoral research, teaching experience for deaf scholars

Sarah in dark grey top and Wyatte in light grey shirt with mult-gray tie standing in front of staircase

A nearly $4 million grant from the National Institutes of Health will help advance research, teaching experiences and career preparation in the biomedical and behavioral sciences fields for deaf and hard-of-hearing postdoctoral scholars.

A program, known as the Rochester Postdoc Partnership (RPP), serves as a national model that allows deaf and hard-of-hearing individuals who have earned advanced degrees to create mentored teaching experiences and do postdoctoral research at Rochester Institute of Technology’s National Technical Institute for the Deaf and University of Rochester.

“What sets this research postdoctoral experience apart from traditional postdoctoral research is the emphasis on teaching scholars ‘how to teach’ and design new courses at RIT/NTID in full-inclusion classroom settings for deaf, hard-of-hearing and hearing undergraduates,” said Peter Hauser, director of the NTID Center on Cognition and Language and the Rochester Bridges to Doctorate Program. “People who are deaf, like myself, are underrepresented in life science disciplines and few are applying for biomedical or behavioral science research grants. This program is helping to rectify that circumstance.”

The program, which received five years of funding from the National Institute of General Medical Sciences through the Institutional Research and Academic Career Development Award, is now in its second year.

Two postdoctoral scholars currently are participating in the program.

Sarah Latchney, Ph.D., from Victor, N.Y., earned her doctoral degree in molecular toxicology at University of Rochester Medical Center and has performed postdoctoral research in neuroscience at University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center. Latchney is now at the Wilmot Cancer Institute at URMC performing postdoctoral research on the cellular and molecular mechanisms affecting bone marrow hematopoietic stem cell biology in normal and pathological conditions. Latchney said she joined the RPP to take advantage of the unique training focus to enhance her academic research portfolio with the added dimension of acquiring skills in teaching pedagogy, designing course curriculum and teaching new classes at RIT/NTID and URMC.

Wyatte Hall, Ph.D., from Albany, N.Y., earned his doctoral degree in clinical psychology at Gallaudet University and performed one year of postdoctoral research in clinical psychology at University of Massachusetts. His research in the RPP program at URMC focuses on the lifelong consequences of language deprivation in deaf children and the developmental impact of early-language experiences on health literacy and outcomes in prenatal care and reproductive health of deaf females. Hall is starting his second year in the program and has gained teaching experience, research skills and training in grant writing to develop his future independent academic research and teaching program.

“It’s exciting to see the program taking off and impacting the careers of deaf and hard-of-hearing scholars, who are extremely underrepresented in science careers beyond a master’s degree,” said Gerard Buckley, NTID president and RIT vice president and dean.

Rochester has built a global reputation as a center for deaf and hard-of-hearing culture and education. In the last decade, collaborations between RIT, NTID, UR and the deaf community have led to a number of unique programs designed to support the growth of deaf and hard-of-hearing scientists.

The program is seeking additional deaf and hard-of-hearing postdoc scholars. For more information, go towww.urmc.rochester.edu/academic-research-careers-deaf-scholars/about-the-program.aspx.

Flanagan named RIT/NTID athlete development coordinator

Skip Flanagan in maroon plaid button down with black t-shirt carrying book bag over his right shoulder

Alumnus and baseball standout Sean “Skip” Flanagan has been named athletic development coordinator for Rochester Institute of Technology’s National Technical Institute for the Deaf. In this role, Flanagan will work in tandem with the RIT Center for Intercollegiate Athletics, RIT varsity and club coaches and NTID faculty and staff to support the participation of deaf and hard-of-hearing student-athletes on varsity and club teams. 

Flanagan, of Framingham, Massachusetts, earned a bachelor’s degree in psychology with a minor in exercise science from RIT’s College of Liberal Arts and currently is working on a master’s degree in educational leadership-intercollegiate athletic leadership at the University of Washington in Seattle.  He previously was RIT/NTID’s student-athlete liaison, a student ambassador for NTID, and played professional baseball.            

As athletic development coordinator, Flanagan will meet periodically with coaches of all RIT varsity teams, attend practices and meet with teams to provide educational seminars to improve team dynamics, as well as meet regularly with individual athletes to develop relationships, provide mentoring, support and problem-solving strategies. He will serve as representative of NTID at RIT athletic department staff meetings and functions.


“We are pleased to have Skip return to his alma mater in a role that takes full advantage of his experience both in the classroom and on the field,” said Dr. Gerard Buckley, NTID president and RIT vice president and dean. “He will serve as a role model to young deaf and hard-of-hearing student-athletes who attend RIT/NTID as well as those considering their college options.”

RIT/NTID receives Motorola Solutions Foundation Innovation Generation Grant

Two smiling female students, one with dark hair and the other light hair and glasses holding a toy robotics vehicle.

Rochester Institute of Technology’s National Technical Institute for the Deaf today announced it has received a grant for $30,000 as part of the “Innovation Generation Grant” program from the Motorola Solutions Foundation, the charitable arm of Motorola Solutions, Inc. Through the grant, RIT/NTID will fund their Tech Girlz and Tech Boyz outreach programs.

The Innovation Generation program provides awards to organizations that foster and support science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) initiatives for teachers and students (U.S. preschool through university level) — especially girls and underrepresented minorities.

Tech Girlz and Tech Boyz are week-long summer camps offered to deaf and hard-of-hearing students entering 7th, 8th and 9th grades who are interested in science, technology, engineering and math. They are taught in English and sign language and offer participants hands-on opportunities to explore technology, build robots and personal computers, and more.

“We are grateful for Motorola Solutions Foundation’s generous support of our outreach tech programs,” said Dr. Gerard Buckley, NTID president and RIT vice president and dean. “These camps provide opportunities for young deaf and hard-of-hearing students to explore careers that they may not have realized were available to them.”

Motorola has been a leader in supporting RIT/NTID’s academic and outreach programs, and this is the fourth time they have helped fund the Tech Girlz and Tech Boyz programs. Since 1984, Motorola Solutions has provided more than $1,000,000 in funding to various RIT and NTID programs.

The Motorola Solutions Foundation grant program overall will impact about 1 million students and teachers this year, each receiving an average of 120 programming hours from partner non-profit organizations and institutions. Programs support special populations, including girls and women; underrepresented minorities; the lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender community; people with disabilities; and the military. 

“The Motorola Solutions Foundation created the Innovation Generation Grant program nine years ago to support educational experiences that spark students to turn their dreams into innovations that will shape our society’s future,” said Matt Blakely, executive director of the Motorola Solutions Foundation. “Organizations like RIT/NTID are teaching tomorrow’s leaders that careers in engineering and technology are both fun and within their reach.”

For additional information on the Motorola Solutions Foundation grants programs, visit: http://responsibility.motorolasolutions.com/index.php/solutions-for-community/ and for more information on RIT/NTID please visit www.ntid.rit.edu

RIT/NTID celebrates growing number of Ph.D. candidates

Madeline Beach in black cap and gown with pink lei around her neck standing next to Peter Hauser in blue cap and gown at podium

Rochester Institute of Technology’s National Technical Institute for the Deaf is honoring deaf and hard-of-hearing graduates who will continue on to earn doctoral degrees in science, technology, engineering or mathematics (STEM) disciplines.

Four RIT/NTID students were enrolled in the Rochester Bridges to the Doctorate program— in partnership with University of Rochester and funded by a grant from the National Institute for General Medical Science—that is helping to fill the gap that exists when it comes to deaf and hard-of-hearing students earning doctoral degrees in science disciplines.

Up to three graduate students are selected each year for entry into the Bridges program. Most of their tuition is paid, and they also earn experience—and a paycheck—working in laboratories at RIT and UR. Throughout the program, they meet regularly with mentors who help prepare them for the academic rigors of earning a doctorate, attend at least two professional conferences and complete three research rotations at UR laboratories.

“We are proud of the accomplishments of these students, who are advancing toward their doctoral degrees and making meaningful contributions to scholarly research,” said Dr. Gerard Buckley, NTID president and RIT vice president and dean. “They are role models for deaf and hard-of-hearing undergraduate students interested in STEM disciplines.”

            The students being honored through the Bridges to the Doctorate program:
            • Lorne Farovitch (Vancouver, Wash.), graduated with a master’s degree in environmental science and will attend University of Rochester Medical Center to earn a Ph.D. in translational biomedical science.
            • Madeline Beach (Aurora, Ill.), graduated with a master’s degree in applied statistics and will attend Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis to earn a Ph.D. in biostatistics.
            • Jessica Contreras (Eagle River, Alaska), graduated with a master’s degree in experimental psychology and will attend the University of Connecticut to earn a Ph.D. in developmental psychology.
            • Gloria Wink (Rochester, N.Y.) graduated with a master’s degree in environmental science and will attend University of Rochester Medical Center to earn a Ph.D. in epidemiology.

Other RIT/NTID graduates who are continuing on to earn advanced degrees:
            • Natalie Snyder (Rockville, Md.) graduated with a bachelor’s degree in biomedical science, with minors in exercise science and psychology, and will attend University of Maryland Eastern Shore to earn a Doctor of Physical Therapy degree.
            • Courtney Kellogg (Lake Waukomis, Mo.) graduated with a master’s degree in chemistry and will attend University of Rochester Medical Center to earn a Ph.D. in Pathways of Human Disease.
For more information about the Bridges to the Doctorate program, go to http://deafscientists.com/

Gaining Business Knowledge on Co-op

Female student with Caterpillar heavy equipment in the background

Marlet Mancera’s co-op experience as a corporate accounting intern at Caterpiller taught her many things among which are that employers value excellence, commitment and teamwork. Her RIT courses helped her develop skills in Microsoft Office, Excel and other software related to her business and accounting interests. She is sure that her business administrations degree and accounting training will guide her to a successful future. 

Brick City Speaker Announced

Young man in blue t-shirt backward baseball cap stand on NY street

Brandon Stanton, the man who created the popular Humans of New York blog and books depicting portraits of life and individuals in New York City, will be this year’s Student Government Horton Distinguished Speaker during Rochester Institute of Technology’s Brick City Homecoming & Family Weekend, Oct. 14-16.

Stanton’s Humans of New York, which has more than 22.5 million followers on Facebook and Instagram, said it all began as a photography project in 2010, with a goal to photograph 10,000 New Yorkers on the street as a catalog of the city’s residents.

Stanton’s talk will be 2-3 p.m. on Saturday, Oct. 15, at the Gordon Field House. Tickets are $5 for RIT students; $10 for RIT faculty, staff, alumni and families; and $15 for the public. Tickets are available at the Brick City Homecoming website, https://www.rit.edu/brickcity/ or at University Arenas Box Office.

The weekend typically draws 17,000 participants to RIT’s campus and the Rochester area. It features more than 100 events during three days, including notable speakers and men and women’s hockey games.

“We have a plethora of new and exciting activities planned for everyone at this year’s family weekend,” said Lynn Rowoth, assistant vice president of special events and director of Brick City Homecoming. “With a wide array of speakers, tours, reunions, athletic events and so much more, the appeal is broad to intrigue and attract our students, parents, families, alumni, staff, faculty and guests.”

Visit the Brick City Homecoming & Family Weekend website for updates.

EYF offers students something new

Two students doing a lab experiment

Deaf and hard-of-hearing students from all over the country attend Explore Your Furutre each year and enjoy hands-on experiences with various careers. This summer camp also gives participants a taste of college life and the opportunity to make new friends. On the final day of camp, a parent workshop offers families the chance to ask questions about admissions and financial aid as well as take a campus tour. More

RIT included in “Fiske Guide to Colleges 2017”

Aerial photo of RIT's sustainability building, four stories high with a red brick and glass exterior

Rochester Institute of Technology has again been named in the “Fiske Guide to Colleges,” one of only 26 private and 21 public universities included in the 2017 edition. The guide highlights RIT’s position as a leader in providing access services for deaf and hard-of-hearing students through its National Technical Institute for the Deaf and its focus on career-oriented and technology-based academics. More.

New scholarship benefits deaf, hard-of-hearing students at RIT/NTID

Mike Lawson in dark suit and tie standing with mom on left in yellow top and plaid skirt and dad on right in brown suit and tie.

RIT’s National Technical Institute for the Deaf has announced the Michael E. Lawson Endowed Scholarship, which will be implemented for the 2016-17 academic year. Lawson was a former RIT men’s soccer standout and assistant coach who was inducted into the RIT Athletics Hall of Fame in 2012.
 
The Lawson scholarship will support deaf and hard-of-hearing students in the College of Liberal Arts and in NTID’s Master of Science in Secondary Education program. At minimum, two awards will be made annually, one to a student in each the College of Liberal Arts and the MSSE program. The Lawson family generously gifted the funds to establish the scholarship.
 
“I am extremely proud to be part of establishing this scholarship for deserving young deaf and hard-of-hearing men and women,” said Lawson, who is a teacher of deaf and hard-of-hearing students at Neptune Middle School in Neptune, NJ. “I hope that the scholarship will provide an opportunity for them to have the same kinds of positive experiences that I had as a student at RIT/NTID.” 
 
Named the RIT Senior Male Athlete of the Year in 2006, Lawson enjoyed an excellent career with the Tigers, starting all 71 games 2002-05, posting 40 points from his midfield position on 13 goals and 14 assists. Eleven of his 13 career goals were game-winners, fourth all-time at the university.
 
Lawson was a four-time All-Empire 8 selection, earning Player of the Year honors in 2004 and 2005. He was also league Rookie of the Year in 2002. Lawson helped guide the Tigers to the 2004 Empire 8 Championship and a berth in the NCAA Tournament. He was also a 2004 National Soccer Coaches Association of America Adidas First Team All-Region selection.
 
“The importance of scholarship support for deserving deaf and hard-of-hearing students at RIT/NTID cannot be overstated,” said Gerard Buckley, NTID president and RIT vice president and dean. “We are so grateful to the Lawson family for their generous gift in honor of their son, Michael, who continues to serve as a role model to our deaf and hard-of-hearing student-athletes.”
 
A three-year team captain, Lawson was a two-time NSCAA Scholar All-American in 2004 and 2005. As an undergraduate, Lawson, an NTID student, maintained a 3.64 grade point average as a social work major. In his graduate studies, he had a 3.90 GPA in deaf education.
 
Lawson served as an assistant coach for the RIT men’s soccer program under head coach Bill Garno 2006-08.
 
Please contact Bryan Hensel, NTID Development at Bryan.Hensel@rit.edu for information on how you can make a gift to the fund.

RIT/NTID appoints Mary Karol Matchett as assistant vice president for student and academic services

Mary Karol Matchett with blonde hair pulled back and bangs, wearing glasses, necklace blue jacket and red shirt.

Mary Karol Matchett, of Brighton, N.Y., has been named assistant vice president for student and academic services at Rochester Institute of Technology’s National Technical Institute for the Deaf.

Matchett will provide direction and oversight for a number of NTID programs and services, including the Counseling and Academic Advising Services Department, Student Life Team, Summer Vestibule Program, First-Year Experiences and Career Exploration Studies programs, NTID Psychological Services and Substance and Alcohol Intervention Services for the Deaf, NTID’s Title IX deputy/liaison, and NTID Financial Services and Student Scholarships.

Matchett will also serve as a member of NTID’s senior leadership group, the NTID Administrative Council, and will report to NTID’s associate vice president for academic affairs. She will be responsible for ensuring that students receive appropriate academic support services through collaboration between faculty and staff across departments. She also will work closely with RIT’s vice president for student affairs to ensure that NTID student needs are represented across the university.

“Mary Karol’s experience as an RIT/NTID student, admissions counselor and parent makes her uniquely qualified to bridge our students’ academic and social success,” said Gerard Buckley, NTID president and RIT vice president and dean. “Her energy, enthusiasm and knowledge of the factors that contribute to the development of well-rounded students will be invaluable in this role.”

Matchett earned a bachelor’s degree in social work at RIT, Master of Social Work degree at Syracuse University and doctorate in executive leadership at St. John Fisher College. She previously served as interim chair of counseling and academic advising services at NTID and prior to that, as special assistant for student success, focusing on RIT/NTID retention efforts.