RIT Building New Clinical Health Sciences Center

RIT is building the new Clinical Health Sciences Center, which will be home to the College of Health Sciences and Technology, a primary care clinic—to be run by Rochester General Hospital—and the recently announced Wegmans School of Health and Nutrition.

“The Clinical Health Sciences Center will be more than a beautiful addition to the campus,” said RIT President Bill Destler. “It will move the RIT & RGHS Alliance forward in its goal to impact the future of health care.”

Construction began in April on the 45,000-square-foot facility expansion at the north end of the Louise M. Slaughter Hall. The Clinical Health Sciences Center is scheduled to open in fall 2015. 

Health Care Employment Panel

Health Care Employment Panel

Often when the topic of jobs in health care comes up, people immediately think of traditional occupations such doctors and nurses. But it’s important for students to realize there are many other options for working in the  health care field. On November 12, the NTID Outreach Consortium and the NTID Center on Employment hosted a panel of four RIT/NTID alumni who shared their paths to careers in health care in non-medical occupations.

Nearly 50 students filled NTID’s Student Development Center to learn about employment options in the fast-growing field of health care. Students learned about the growing need due to the expansion of the health care industry as the U.S. population ages. It’s estimated that by 2022, there will be 5,000,000 jobs in the healthcare field.

Garth Arnold, applications integration programmer at the University of Rochester Medical Center here in Rochester; Aaron Bosley, application developer at Highmark in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania; Shentara Cobb, administrative assistant at St. Mary and Elizabeth Hospital in Louisville, Kentucky; and Camille Ouellette, lecturer in the Department of Science and Mathematics here at NTID, all shared information about their majors, co-ops, job searches and employment experiences with students and other visitors.

In terms of getting a job in this, or any field, and being successful, the panel offered these suggestions:

  • When at work, be a team player.
  • Network, network, network to get to the job you want.
  • Cultivate relationships with professors on campus; they can connect you with valuable resources.

For more information about health care careers for the deaf and hard-of-hearing community, visit http://www.rit.edu/ntid/healthcare/education.

 

 

RIT/NTID Student Changes Statewide Testing, Earns National Girl Scout Award

A second-year RIT/NTID student is receiving national recognition this week as one of 10 Girl Scout USA 2014 Young Women of Distinction at a national convention in Salt Lake City.

Anna Krauss of Manorville, N.Y., has been a Girl Scout since age 5, when she joined as a Daisy Scout. Now that she is in college, she’s an Ambassador Scout and majoring in biotechnology and molecular bioscience. She regularly makes the Dean’s List at RIT.

Born deaf in one ear, Krauss lost her hearing in her other ear at age 9. Since then, she has relied on a sign language interpreter in her school classes.

In 2011, two years before she’d graduate from high school, Krauss was taking state-required tests. A portion of the test was a listening passage, given orally. Being profoundly deaf, Krauss had to rely on her interpreter to help her understand what the teacher was saying.

“I always dreaded the state tests for their listening portions,” she said. “Sometimes things get lost in translation,” Krauss said. She ended up with a test score of 80. “I started to cry if I got below a 90 in school,” she said. “It was ridiculous.”

For her Gold Award project, similar to the projects Boy Scouts must complete to become Eagle Scouts, Krauss decided to try to change the way those mandated listening portions of state tests are given to deaf and hard-of-hearing students in New York.

“I picked that because I felt very strongly about it,” she said. Krauss started lobbying state officials and as a result, the state now allows deaf and hard-of-hearing students across the state to use a written transcript during oral portions of examinations.

“It took three years for me to fight for that accommodation,” she said.

She doesn’t plan to attend the Girl Scout Convention in Salt Lake City because she doesn’t want to miss any classes. This summer, she traveled to the Girl Scouts of USA headquarters in New York City and met Anna Maria Chavez, the CEO of the Girls Scouts of the USA. Chavez presented Krauss with a $5,000 check that came with her award, which Krauss will use for college.

After college, she’s considering becoming a researcher or a science teacher, perhaps at RIT’s National Technical Institute for the Deaf.

But Krauss hopes to stay connected with the Girl Scouts as an alumnus so they can continue to empower girls like her. “I do want to continue in some way, to talk with younger troops to tell them how much they can do by staying with Girl Scouts and going all the way,” Krauss said. “It starts with cookie sales and ends with changing the world.”