RIT again named among the nation’s leading ‘green colleges’ in Princeton Review

Woman with long dark hair wearing black short-sleeved top and silver earring.

Rochester Institute of Technology is one of the most environmentally responsible colleges, according to The Princeton ReviewThe education services company, known for its test prep and tutoring services, books and college rankings, features RIT in the 2016 edition of its free downloadable book, The Princeton Review Guide to 361 Green Colleges.

The Princeton Review chose schools for this seventh-annual edition of its “green guide” based on data from the company’s 2015-2016 survey of hundreds of four-year colleges concerning the schools’ commitments to the environment and sustainability.

“I am pleased that RIT has once again been recognized by The Princeton Review for our commitment to sustainability,” said Enid Cardinal, senior sustainability adviser to the president. “We lead through example as shown by sustainability through our research, academics and operations here at RIT.”

“We strongly recommend Rochester Institute of Technology and the other fine colleges in this guide to the many environmentally minded students who seeks to study and live at green colleges,” said Robert Franek, senior VP and publisher, The Princeton Review.

Franek noted the growing interest the company has seen among college-bound students in green colleges. “Among more than 10,000 teens and parents who participated in our 2016 College Hopes & Worries Survey, 61 percent told us that having information about a school’s commitment to the environment would influence their decision to apply to attend the college.”

The profiles in The Princeton Review’s Guide to 361 Green Colleges provide information about each school’s admission requirements, cost and financial aid, and student body stats. They also include “Green Facts” about the schools with details on the availability of transportation alternatives and the percentage of the school food budgets spent on local/organic food.

RIT was recognized for the university’s availability of transportation alternatives, including bike storage, shower facilities and lockers for bicycle commuters as well as a telecommuting program for employees and a carpool/vanpool matching program. RIT also received high marks for programs encouraging employees to live close to campus.

The Princeton Review first published the guide in 2010. It chose schools based on “Green Rating” scores (from 60 to 99) that the company tallied this summer for 640 colleges using data from its 2015-16 survey of school administrators. The survey asked them to report on their school’s sustainability-related policies, practices and programs. More than 25 data points were weighted in the assessment. Schools with Green Ratings scores of 80 or higher made it into the guide. Most of the schools (350) are in the United States, while 10 are in Canada and one in Egypt.

The guide can be downloaded at http://www.princetonreview.com/green-guide.aspx.

Ways to Learn About Government Jobs

On Campus:  Good Ways to Learn About Government Jobs for Co-op and Full-time Work

by John Macko, Director, NTID Center on Employment


Workforce Recruitment Program

If your student needs to look for a summer co-op and wants to work for a government agency, one of the best ways is to apply for the Workforce Recruitment Program (WRP).

WRP connects government agencies with college students and recent graduates with disabilities who are looking for work. To be eligible, your student needs to be a U.S. citizen. Your student can be in any major at any degree level. Each year a number of RIT/NTID students find co-ops and full-time jobs through WRP.

Representatives from WRP will be conducting interviews remotely by telecommunications in the NCE office October 27 – November 18. Students should contact their NCE employment advisor to start the application process. The deadline to complete and submit applications is October 14.


The STAR Program

For several years, RIT/NTID has been a participant in the Department of Defense (DOD) Student Training and Academic Recruitment (STAR) Program. The NTID Center on Employment is the supervising department for this program, which allows NTID to hire a student to work part-time during the school year as a representative to help other students become more informed about the DOD and more aware of DOD’s various employment and scholarship opportunities.

This year’s representative is Kelly Jo Hilleshiem, a fourth-year student majoring in marketing with a concentration in public relations in RIT’s Saunders College of Business. Her job is to help students with their federal resumes; assist with navigating the federal job application system; and help search for scholarships, internships and job opportunities as well as provide information about other resources. Interested students can drop by the NTID Center on Employment Office in LBJ Hall, Building 60, Room 2806 to schedule an appointment with Kelly Jo.

RIT/NTID job fair will connect deaf students with employers across the country

Tall male student in a suit with cochlear implant discusses resume with male recruiter in red shirt with Harris display behind.

Representatives from more than 40 local and national corporations, federal agencies and nonprofit organizations will meet with hundreds of deaf and hard-of-hearing students—who are also prospective employees—at the 16th annual job fair, 12:30–4 p.m. on Wednesday, Oct. 19, at Rochester Institute of Technology’s National Technical Institute for the Deaf. The event will be held in Lyndon Baines Johnson Hall on the RIT campus.

“Employers will have the opportunity to recruit talented deaf and hard-of-hearing students in associate and bachelor’s degree programs such as business, finance, graphic design, engineering, computing and more,” said John Macko, director of NTID’s Center on Employment.

Interpreters will be available at each table, and in many cases, the company recruiters are NTID alumni. Companies include Aetna, Baxter Health Care, Central Intelligence Agency, Defense Finance and Accounting Service, Dow Chemical Co., Excellus BlueCross BlueShield, Harris Corp., Internal Revenue Service, The Learning Center for the Deaf, Lockheed Martin, and the U.S. Department of Defense, among others.

NTID’s Center on Employment will also recognize companies who consistently hire deaf and hard-of-hearing individuals. This year’s honorees are Solar Turbines based in San Diego, and Ohio Health Corporation based in Columbus, Ohio.

“Employers continue to want highly qualified employees who bring the necessary skills and who will fit into the company culture and contribute to the company’s success,” said Macko. “Our students are well trained and can hit the ground running at companies right here in Rochester and all over the country.”

There are a few openings available for employers who want to participate. For more information, email Mary Ellen Tait or call 585-475-6426.

Alumni tailgate gathering for Brick City Homecoming and Family Weekend

Stylized drawing of RIT buildings in shades of orange, red and brown with Brick City logo to its right.

From 4:30 to 6 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 15, join fellow RIT/NTID alumni, NTID faculty/staff and other friends for a pre-hockey game tailgate gathering at the Stock Exchange, which is walking distance from the Blue Cross Arena. This event is always a big draw – don’t miss it this year! Complimentary finger foods and beverages will be provided for you to enjoy. Get pumped up with some Tiger spirit before our RIT Tigers take to the ice.

*This event is primarily for those alumni and friends affiliated with NTID. Short program and speakers will be using American Sign Language.

Visit the event webpage to register.

Enjoying a Challenge

A student in a white shirt with beard and glasses sits by a computer with the screen off and other equipment.

Benjamin Polstra from Noblesville, Indiana, completed a summer co-op at GEICO in Chevy Chase, Maryland, that turned into a fulltime job. Polstra, who will graduate in sping 2016 with a bachelor’s degree in information technology, worked as a GEICO summer intern.

Polstra was responsible for a significant information technology (IT) business project—bigger than any project he had ever worked on before, and to complete it, he had to learn different tools and concepts along the way. He used his information technology skills on individual assignments and team projects, attended meetings and gave presentations. He was able to reach out to and receive mentoring from  team members and members of the IT management team. By the end of the summer, Polstra felt he had become a better developer with the increased confidence that came from handling a project of that size. He also learned how an insurance company runs and how they practice customer service.

He says that taking courses that taught the fundamental and advanced level of object-oriented programming, such as Java or C#, was valuable. The courses he took that teach client and server programming were necessary as well. The software design, principles and patterns, organizational behavior and apps development practices courses all were greatly helpful in his summer responsibilities, and taking on a leadership role gave him valuable experience in how to work with a team. He also learned that no matter where you work, asking a lot of questions is a must-have skill.

Polstra believes his degree will open doors to many opportunities. The coursework associated with it has prepared the fundamental bedrock, which he can use to demonstrate his knowledge of the IT field, and to work confidently with new concepts and ideas. He says that GEICO is the manifestation of how he’s been preparing himself; it has been changing, abandoning old traditions and embracing new ideas. The company has expanded its IT department rapidly to enable their growth spurt. That’s how he sees himself—growing rapidly to become not only a better IT person, but a more accomplished software developer.

Polstra offers the following advice for other students. “Don’t just work hard; play with what you like to do. If you are majoring in photography, play around with a camera.If computer science is your major, play around with a computer. Share with your friends and find mentors who can help you grow. You shouldn’t be discouraged by a challenge. Just try hard, and when you are successful, you will end up enjoying your success a lot more. Don’t think about grades so much because you will already excel at what you do, if you enjoy whatever you are doing.”

RIT ranked among top national universities by ‘U.S. News & World Report’

Male in white labcoat stands and holds a cable, 2nd male in red tshirt and shorts wears headphones and virtual reality eyemask.

Rochester Institute of Technology is being recognized as a top tier national university for the first time in the 34-year history of “U.S. News & World Report” rankings. The change is a result of the university’s reclassification in becoming a “doctoral university” this year due to its rapid increase in research and Ph.D. graduates.

The 2017 edition ofU.S. News & World Report Best Colleges” ranked RIT 107th in the “National Universities” category. These top universities—a grouping of 310 schools— “offer a full range of undergraduate majors, plus master’s and Ph.D. programs, and emphasize faculty research,” according to “U.S. News.” RIT had previously been listed among “Regional Universities.” Overall, “U.S. News” cites 1,374 four-year colleges and universities in various categories.

“The movement of RIT into the ranks of the nation’s finest colleges and universities is a remarkable story,” said RIT President Bill Destler. “We are not trying to emulate some of the nation’s great universities. We will do what RIT does so well, and that is by being different and capitalizing on that difference to make a truly unique experience for our students and for our communities. We have nearly a dozen programs that are ranked in the top 10 nationally,beyond U.S News. And these programs are in non-traditional academic areas such as interactive games and media, industrial design, imaging science, sustainable manufacturing and packaging science.”

RIT also ranked 33rd among best value schools—“Great Schools, Great Prices.” The calculation compares a school’s academic quality to the net cost of attendance for a student who receives the average level of financial aid. “The higher the quality of the program and the lower the cost, the better the deal,” according to “U.S. News.” In other rankings, RIT also was recognized for excellence in its business and engineering colleges, its cooperative education program, and its benefits for military veterans.

The move to the top tier national category was triggered earlier this year when RIT was listed as a “doctoral university” by the leading classification of U.S. colleges and universities. The Carnegie Classification of Institutions of Higher Education changed RIT from “Masters – Comprehensive” to “Doctoral University” This change occurs when a university graduates more than 20 Ph.D. degrees per year, a figure that RIT has exceeded in recent years. In May, RIT awarded 35 doctoral degrees in seven Ph.D. programs, the most in its history.

RIT has seven doctoral programs: astrophysics, color science, computing and information sciences, engineering, microsystems engineering, imaging science and sustainability. A Ph.D. in mathematical modeling begins in fall 2017.

“In previous ‘U.S. News’ rankings, RIT historically received high marks in peer review with other universities,” Destler noted. “We are extremely pleased to see our peer assessment scores did well with other presidents, provosts, deans of admissions and high school counselors in the top tier research grouping.” Here, RIT rated 66th among its peer universities and 49th with the counselors.

In further rankings:

  • RIT was among 22 universities recognized for excellent cooperative learning and internship programs.
  • RIT ranked 69th among “Best Colleges for Veterans.” “U.S. News” aims to provide military veterans and active duty service members with data on which top-ranked schools offer benefits that can help make a college education affordable.
  • RIT’s Kate Gleason College of Engineering ranked No. 65 nationally for undergraduate engineering programs among universities where the highest degree is a doctorate.
  • RIT’s Saunders College of Business was ranked No. 77 nationally among best programs for undergraduate business education.

Go to rit.edu/news/story.php?id=56877 for a list of frequently asked questions about the rankings and RIT’s reclassification.

NTID Center on Employment here for your student

Employment counselor in blue shirt works with student in pink shirt to create resume on computer

The NTID Center on Employment (NCE) is here for your student.

by John Macko, Director, NTID Center on Employment

The role of the NTID Center on Employment team is to assist current students and graduates with the search for co-ops or full-time jobs. The key is to make sure your student enlists our support. After their second year, most students are required to do a co-op, so encourage your students to take advantage of some or all of the services we offer. Below are a few of the ways we can help. The NCE website lists many more.

Job Search Assistance

When your student arrives on campus, he or she is assigned an NCE employment advisor based on his or her major. NCE employment advisors provide job search tutoring that can help your student:

  • Write or improve resumes and cover letters
  • Complete a job application
  • Put together a list of references and a portfolio
  • Use books and web resources to find employers to contact about possible jobs
  • Find job announcements on the web and apply
  • Consider different ways to approach employers
  • Prepare for interviews and follow up with employers
  • Understand the various communication strategies and accommodations in the workplace
  • Get ready for the working world

Networking Guidance

We advise students that one of the best ways to find employment opportunities is through networking—asking people they know to help them with their search. Many jobs are not advertised to the general public and may only be known by the people working at the company. These jobs, called the hidden job market, are often found through networking. We can guide your student with some good networking strategies. Their network can help them find job openings and make contact with employers.

Liaison with an Employer Network

Every year, NCE staff travel all around the country to meet with employers and develop relationships that encourage them to hire deaf and hard-of-hearing students who are well trained and ready to hit the ground running. Some of the employers NCE has developed relationships with are: BNY Mellon, Defense Finance and Accounting Service, DOW Chemical Company, FBI, General Electric, Google, IBM, Merck, Microsoft, NASA, National Security Agency, Naval Supply Systems Command, Ohio Health, Sprint, Texas Instruments, Toyota, U.S. Bureau of Printing and Engraving, University of San Diego and many more.

If you have questions or concerns about anything in the area of employment, or would like to find out who your student’s employment advisor is, please feel free to contact us at by email at ntidcoe@rit.edu, by phone at 585-475-6219 or by videophone at 585-286-4544.

RIT to become first university to publish video game on Xbox One platform

Rochester Institute of Technology will become the first university to publish a video game on the Xbox One gaming platform when Hack, Slash & Backstab is officially launched on Wednesday, Aug. 31. The game, which will be available for purchase, will also debut simultaneously on the Steam platform and be available for sale through the digital storefront Humble.

Hack, Slash & Backstab was produced in residence at RIT in a studio course offered through RIT’s internationally ranked School of Interactive Games and Media, and the RIT Center for Media, Arts, Games, Interaction and Creativity (MAGIC).

The game won third place in the Best Visual Quality category of the 2016 Intel University Games Showcase in March as part of the 2016 Game Developers Conference in San Francisco.

RIT’s game design and development program was recently ranked third at the undergraduate level and seventh at the graduate level according to the new 2016 international rankings from “The Princeton Review.” More.

RIT/NTID team wins National Association of the Deaf College Bowl for the sixth time

Gerry Buckley in orange RIT golf shirt cheering w/four team members and two coaches in black RIT shirts holding trophy.

A student team from Rochester Institute of Technology’s National Technical Institute for the Deaf has won the National Association of the Deaf College Bowl academic competition for the third consecutive year, and earned its sixth victory overall.

Held at the biennial NAD conference since 1988, the College Bowl is a four-day question-and-answer academic competition with topics as varied as literature, science, mathematics, history and current events. The event, which brings together deaf contestants from top colleges and universities serving deaf and hard-of-hearing students, regularly draws more than 1,000 audience members to the finals.

Teams of four students from each school vie for the trophy and scholarships for their respective colleges. In addition to RIT/NTID, teams at this year’s competition held in Phoenix were from California State University-Northridge, Gallaudet University and the University of Minnesota.

The winning RIT/NTID team members are Lauren Berger, a psychology major from Rochester, N.Y.; Eric Epstein, a software engineering major from Tucson, Ariz.; Asher Kirschbaum, a mechanical engineering major from Washington Grove, Md.; and Emmanuel Perrodin-Njoku, a biomedical sciences major from Washington, D.C.

“The weekly practice throughout the year paid off big time,” said Epstein. “I am so proud of my teammates for their yearlong efforts in studying. I look forward to the next generation of Tigers who will undoubtedly defend the bowl.”

The team worked with co-coaches and RIT/NTID faculty members Christopher Kurz and Gary Behm to prepare for the competition.

“The entire RIT/NTID community is so proud of our College Bowl team for bringing the trophy back to campus for another two years,” said Gerry Buckley, NTID president and RIT vice president and dean. “Lauren, Eric, Asher and Emmanuel did an extraordinary job against fierce competition. They are carrying on a great tradition, and it was wonderful to have so many of our students, faculty, staff and alumni in the audience cheering on our students.”