RIT named by U.S. Dept. of Energy to lead new Manufacturing USA Institute on clean energy

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Rochester Institute of Technology’s Golisano Institute for Sustainability was selected by the U.S. Department of Energy, as part of its Manufacturing USA initiative, to lead its new Reducing Embodied-Energy and Decreasing Emissions (REMADE) Institute—a national coalition of leading universities and companies that will forge new clean energy initiatives deemed critical in keeping U.S. manufacturing competitive. More.

RIT ranked a ‘best value’ university

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Rochester Institute of Technology ranks among the country’s best values in private colleges, according to “Kiplinger’s Personal Finance’s Top 300 College Values of 2017.”

Kiplinger’s annual list ranks 300 private universities, liberal arts colleges and public colleges, as well as separate lists in each of those categories.

RIT ranked 85th out of 100 on the list of private universities, and 266th among all colleges. More.

The value of networking during break

The value of networking during break

by John Macko

Director, NTID Center on Employment

While RIT is on break until January 23, there are some things your student can do during that time to plan for the future, and one of them is networking to find a co-op or permanent job. It’s a fact that one of the best ways to find jobs is networking, as statistics show between 75 and 80 percent of jobs are found that way. Many jobs are not advertised to the general public and may only be known by the people working at the company. These jobs, called the hidden job market, are often found through networking.

Students should take advantage of winter break to make contacts. It’s the perfect opportunity to reach out to folks at home about connections they may have that are relevant to your son’s or daughter’s interests. And building their network now will help in the job search after graduation.

Here are a few ways you could be helpful to your student and become part of his or her network:

  1. Network with people you know to provide some leads for your student. Your contacts can be at work, at the athletic club or gym, or even friends and neighbors—whomever you think might be a possible employment contact.
  2.  Encourage your son or daughter to contact at least two people over break.

For information about networking strategies for your student, visit http://www.ntid.rit.edu/nce/students/networking.

Introducing RIT/NTID’s New Athlete Development Program

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A new program is underway, making the competitive world of collegiate sports even more accessible to all students.The RIT/NTID Athlete Development Program  provides support and training to improve quality of deaf and hard-of-hearing athletes’ experience as key members of their respective athletic programs. Skip Flangan, RIT/NTID’s athlete development coordinator, is working closely with RIT varsity coaches, NTID faculty and staff and, of course, the athletes themselves to help ensure greatness on and off the field, court or track. More.

RIT/NTID founding faculty member Robert Panara to be immortalized on postage stamp

Image of stamp of Bob Panara signing

Educator and icon Robert Panara, the first deaf faculty member of Rochester Institute of Technology’s National Technical Institute for the Deaf, is being honored by the U.S. Postal Service with a stamp.

The 16th stamp in the Distinguished Americans series features Panara, an influential professor and pioneer in the field of Deaf Studies and one of the founders of the National Theatre of the Deaf.

“I’m very proud to see my dad honored and Deaf culture recognized in this way, and I want to thank the personnel at the USPS Stamp Development Office for all their work in the design process,” said Panara’s son John, himself a faculty member at RIT/NTID.

The stamp features a photograph of Panara signing the word “respect” taken by RIT/NTID photographer Mark Benjamin and was designed by USPS art director Ethel Kessler.

During his teaching career, Panara inspired generations of students, and his powerful use of American Sign Language to convey Shakespeare and other works of literature, made him much beloved and respected by students and colleagues alike.

Panara was born hearing in Bronx, N.Y. At age 10, he contracted spinal meningitis, which left him profoundly deaf. He attended mainstream public schools and often relied on classmates to take notes for him or mouth words so he could lipread.

He graduated from DeWitt Clinton High School in New York City, learned sign language at the American School for the Deaf in Hartford, Conn., and then earned a bachelor’s degree at Gallaudet College (now University) in 1940, where he wrote several papers that established him as a leader in the field of deaf education. “The Significance of the Reading Problem” expressed his belief that “what the world needs today is more teaching that comes from the heart and soul and not of the coldly conservative and somewhat reticent mind.” This insight would form his teaching style.

Panara’s love of drama and theater made his classes some of the most sought after by both deaf and hearing students.

In 1965, he was invited by U.S. Secretary of Education John Gardner to serve on a national advisory board for the establishment of NTID. He began his career at NTID in 1967 and became its first deaf professor. He also established the English department at NTID where his son, John, currently teaches. Throughout the years, Panara won a number of awards and distinctions including the RIT Founders Award, the NTID Student Association Outstanding Staff Award and the RIT Eisenhart Award for Outstanding Teaching. He also holds honorary degrees from Gallaudet University and MacMurray College.

He founded the NTID Drama Club and was a founding member of the National Theatre of the Deaf, and has been honored by the World Federation of the Deaf for his contributions to education and culture.

Panara, who passed away in July 2014 at the age of 94, was an avid poet, lover of Shakespeare and theater, and fan of baseball and the Rochester Red Wings.

“Bob Panara’s contributions to the field of Deaf Studies, theater and education are indeed worthy of celebrating,” said Gerard J. Buckley, NTID president and RIT vice president and dean. “RIT/NTID and the entire Deaf community is justifiably proud that Bob is being honored in such a meaningful way.”

The formal Date of Issue will take place at a ceremony in April 2017 in Rochester, New York, home of RIT/NTID where Panara taught for 20 years. 

A Career in Biotechnology

Female student with wavy brown hair wearing a lab coat and smiling standing outside of a lab with lab tables and equipment in th

Michelle Mailhot, a lab science technology major from West Newfield, Maine, spent her summer on co-op at the Merck High-Throughput Screening Facility in North Wales, Pennsylvania. Her co-op, the LST program and all of the courses she has taken and the instrumentation skills she’s developed  will provide a strong foundation for her success in RIT’s College of Science.

The RIT Saunders College of Business unveils two new learning communities

Business Analytics lab contains workstations with orange chairs and laptops, and a S&P 100 Index Stock Market Ticker.

The RIT Saunders College of Business unveils two state-of-the-art collaborative learning environments for students that are unlike any other learning spaces at RIT.

The REDCOM Active Learning Collaboratory provides an interactive learning experience with self-contained student pods for collaboration, supported by digital and traditional displays and video conferencing capability for distributed teamwork.

The Business Analytics Lab is an 800-square-foot newly renovated space equipped with the latest in Bloomberg Financial Markets technology and other analytics software—complete with an S&P 100 Index stock market ticker and 16 work stations. More.