All posts by Kathy Johncox

Kathy is the editor and writer for Parent News. She is a Communications, Marketing & Multimedia Services Specialist at RIT/NTID.

RIT/NTID researchers study safety of electronic cigarette flavorings

RIT/NTID part of team studying effects of flavorings used in e-cigarettes.

RIT/NTID faculty and student researchers are developing methods to analyze the effects of flavorings used in electronic cigarettes. In partnership with RIT’s Kate Gleason College of Engineering and the University of Rochester Medical Center, RIT/NTID, the world’s first and largest technological college for deaf and hard-of-hearing students, is part of the team that has received a grant from the National Institutes of Health to conduct the study. More.

RIT gets high marks for return on investment

RIT featured in Princeton Review book, ‘Colleges That Pay You Back: 2016 Edition’

Rochester Institute of Technology is being recognized by The Princeton Review for being one of the nation’s best colleges for students seeking a superb education with great career preparation and at an affordable price. According to the summary, “Employers trust the RIT brand implicitly, and the school stresses experiential learning and creativity as a part of every curriculum. Although RIT is a larger private school, it feels much smaller than it is because of its tight-knit community, and students are afforded many opportunities to branch out, work with other majors, and pursue non-technical interests.” More.

RIT points of pride

A world leader in education and access for deaf and hard-of-hearing students.

Rochester Institute of Technology is emerging as one of the world’s most innovative, agile, diverse and forward-thinking universities. At RIT, we forge greatness by being different. We are a world leader in education and access for deaf and hard-of-hearing students. We have students who improve HIV medications in Africa, conduct remote sensing on volcanoes in Iceland, help select the Mars 2020 rover landing site, and win national cyber-defense competitions. And we have faculty who invent wearable technologies that protect soldiers, who work on the nation’s top advanced manufacturing initiatives, and are named U.S. Professor of the Year.

This is just a start. Check out the RIT Points of Pride website.

Presentation on Deaf culture in Vietnam

Vietnamese presenter pointing at projection screen with ASL interpreter looking on

For the past four summers a group of faculty from RIT/NTID’s American Sign Language and Intpreting Education Department have been working in Bien Hoa, Vietnam, providing interpreter education for deaf and hearing teachers of the deaf. The Vietnamese teachers have been on campus in January sharing language, culture and the Deaf experience in Vietnam. RIT/NTID faculty involved include Lyn Finton, Ken Finton, Kevin Williams and Kathleen Holcombe.

The Vietnamese teachers are part of the Educational Interpreter Project at the Center for Studying and Promoting Deaf Culture at Dong Nai University in Dong Nai, Vietnam, and the project is sponsored by NTID’s Pre-college Education Network, funded by the Nippon Foundation of Japan. 

Johnston named to RIT/NTID faculty

Lisa Johnston in white t-shirt.

Lisa Johnston has joined the faculty at Rochester Institute of Technology’s National Technical Institute for the Deaf as a member of the American Sign Language & Interpreting Education Department.

Johnston holds a bachelor’s degree in business administration from Gallaudet University and a master’s degree in sign language studies from the University of Arizona, focusing on signed language and deaf studies, curriculum development and pedagogy, and American Sign Language. Her thesis focused on the process of acquiring ASL as a second language for teachers of deaf students in academic settings.

Her major academic interests are literature, Deaf culture, teaching ASL as a first and second language, linguistics of signed language, ASL assessment and diagnostics, curriculum development and pedagogy, and first and second language acquisition. She has taught courses in all levels of ASL, as well as “Narrative and Poetic Styles in ASL,” “Current Trends in Deaf-related Careers” and others.

She holds professional certification from the American Sign Language Teachers Association (ASLTA), and serves as an ASLTA evaluator. She is a former board member of Deaf Women of Rochester, served on ASLTA’s Greater Rochester chapter, and served on the education/training subcommittee of the National Center for Deaf Health Research at the University of Rochester.

Prior to joining the faculty, Johnston was a faculty member teaching American Sign Language at RIT, the University of Rochester, Gallaudet University, Riverside Community College in Riverside, California, and the University of Arizona, Tucson.

She enjoys travel and water-related activities. Her two children are being raised in combined Deaf, Greek, and American cultures.

RIT presidential spotlight: faculty achievement

RIT faculty make learning, research and innovation come alive

Excelling in teaching and in research, RIT faculty members are passionate about their disciplines and their roles, both in the classroom and the lab. They engage students in the process of discovery and the contribution of new knowledge to their fields. RIT faculty enjoy interacting with students, and they push the boundaries of both personal and professional potential, both for themselves and their students. Their commitment, drive and student-centered focus are hallmarks of this great university.

Hartman named to RIT/NTID faculty

laural hartman with curly hair wearing black and white print top with black sweater

Laural Hartman has joined the faculty at Rochester Institute of Technology’s National Technical Institute for the Deaf a lecturer in the Visual Communication Studies Department, teaching core courses such as Drawing and Principles of Design and Color. 

Born and raised in the Los Angeles area where she attended TRIPOD, Hartman graduated from RIT/NTID in 2005 with a BFA in Illustration and went on to earn a master’s degree in NTID’s Master of Science program in Secondary Education of Students Who are Deaf or Hard of Hearing in 2007. Her husband, Jeff is a fellow RIT/NTID alumnus who works as a systems administrator for Convo Communications. They have a one-year-old son named Holden.

After graduating from RIT/NTID, Hartman moved to San Francisco where she bought an antique press and established her own letterpress shop, Dirty Beard Press. Prior to moving back to Rochester, she taught high school at The Learning Center for the Deaf (now Marie Philips School) in Framingham, Massachusetts.  She continues to run Dirty Beard Press on weekends.

Her custom work has been exhibited at The Berkeley Art Center, the Minna Gallery in San Francisco and the Delaplaine Gallery in Frederick, Maryland. 

“We are fortunate to have another talented member of our alumni community back on campus as part of the faculty,” said Dr. Gerry Buckley, NTID president and RIT vice president and dean. “Laural brings a wealth of knowledge and experience to our students and serves as a role model for them.”

 

Allen named to RIT/NTID faculty

Alesia Allen wearing glasses, white shirt and necklace

Alesia Nicole Allen has joined the faculty at Rochester Institute of Technology’s National Technical Institute for the Deaf as a visiting assistant professor in the Department of Liberal Studies.

Allen teaches introductory courses in Psychology and Abnormal Psychology.

A native of Ohio, Allen attended RIT/NTID and earned a bachelor’s degree in Psychology in 2004. She earned a master’s degree in Clinical Psychology from Gallaudet University, and expects to defend her dissertation in 2016 and earn a Ph.D. from Gallaudet in Clinical Psychology.  

She is the recipient of the Dwight David Eisenhower Transportation Fellowship Program Achievement Award, Officer Appreciation Award and Outstanding Advocacy Award presented by NTID’s Student Government for advocating the needs of deaf and hard-of-hearing people on campus. She also was honored for her service to the Philadelphia community for providing services for deaf and hard-of-hearing individuals with mental health concerns.

“In my opinion, teaching goes beyond the classroom and also consists of advising and mentoring,” Allen said. “This is critical because I believe effective teaching involves building rapport and being sensitive to students’ needs.  Another important responsibility involves scholarship and staying up to date with research trends in the field. Currently, I am working on completing my dissertation which focuses primarily on hard-of-hearing individuals and their overall psychological well-being. I encourage students to get involved in research and provide support to them in their efforts. Finally, there’s a service component of my job. Service initiatives may include getting involved on committees to help provide feedback on improving goals of the department, mentoring students, or getting involved in some efforts to help Rochester community.” 

“We are pleased to have Alesia back at RIT/NTID as a member of our faculty,” said Dr. Gerry Buckley, NTID president and RIT vice president and dean. “She is an outstanding example of all that is possible with an RIT/NTID education, and is a true role model for our students.”

 

RIT’s national Carnegie Classification changed to “Doctoral University”

students in 'clean suits' with heads and faces covered in a lab looking at a monitor

It’s official: Rochester Institute of Technology is now considered a “doctoral university” by the leading national classification of U.S. colleges and universities.

The Carnegie Classification of Institutions of Higher Education has changed RIT from “Masters – Comprehensive” to “Doctoral University – Limited Research Activity.” This change occurs when a university graduates more than 20 Ph.D. degrees per year, a figure that RIT has exceeded in recent years. In May 2015, RIT awarded 33 doctoral degrees in seven Ph.D. programs, the most in its history.

“We have been expecting this change, and it reflects the rapid upward momentum of RIT over the last several decades,” said RIT President Bill Destler. “The movement of RIT into the ranks of the nation’s finest colleges and universities is a remarkable story.”

The Carnegie Classification has been the leading framework for recognizing and describing institutional diversity in U.S. higher education for the past 46 years. The Carnegie Commission on Higher Education developed a classification of colleges and universities to support its program of research and policy analysis in 1970. This framework has been widely used in the study of higher education, both as a way to represent and control for institutional differences, and also in the design of research studies to ensure adequate representation of sampled institutions, students, or faculty.

RIT began its first doctoral program in 1990 in imaging science, the first in the nation. In the 2000s, RIT added six more in the areas of astrophysics, color science, computing and information sciences, engineering, microsystems engineering, and sustainability. Several interdisciplinary doctoral programs are in the planning stages.

RIT sponsored research grew by 18 percent in 2015, reaching a record $62 million in funding. RIT received 356 new awards from a variety of state, federal, corporate, and foundation sponsors. Federal funding was at an all-time high with the National Science Foundation providing $13 million and the National Institutes of Health providing $3 million.

The Carnegie Classification change also means that RIT will likely soon be ranked among the “National Universities” by U.S. News & World Report, rather than among the top “Regional Universities – North” as has been the case since the magazine began its annual rankings in 1983.

For the first time in the university’s 187-year history, the word “research” was incorporated into the vision statement of RIT’s 2015-2025 strategic plan “Greatness Through Difference.” The vision statement reads: “RIT will be a great world university whose academic portfolio, research agenda, and educational model align with the shifting needs of a complex planet.”