Category Archives: Campus Events

Opening events for academic year 2016-2017

Four students in brown t-shirts with an orange RIT imprint pose for a

Join the RIT community for opening events for the 2016-2017 academic year.

The Convocation for New Students and Families begins 2 p.m. Wednesday, August 17 in the Gordon Field House and Activities Center. This event provides new students with a traditional induction into RIT’s intellectual community. The Convocation for New Students and Families features an academic procession, recognition of faculty, welcoming remarks by Dr. Sandra Johnson, senior vice president for Student Affairs, and Andrea Shaver, president of Student Government. Dr. Leslie Kate Wright, associate professor, Thomas H. Gosnell School of Life Sciences, College of Science, and a recipient of the 2015-2016 Eisenhart Award for Outstanding Teaching, will serve as keynote speaker. In his remarks, Dr. Destler will provide the overall acceptance of the new class and our commitment to their livelihood and academic growth.

Participants in the Tiger Walk, which precedes the Convocation, will greet new students beginning at 1:30 p.m. The Tiger Walk has become a tradition where alumni, faculty, and staff enthusiastically greet the incoming class as they enter the Field House. 

President Destler’s Address to the Community will be 9 a.m. Friday, August 19  in the Gordon Field House and Activities Center. The chairs of Academic Senate and Staff Council, the president of Student Government, and the interim vice president and associate provost for Diversity and Inclusion will each welcome us to the new academic year and briefly share their plans for the upcoming year. Dr. Destler will then deliver his address. A coffee hour will precede the President’s Address, beginning at 8 a.m. on the second floor of the Gordon Field House.

All members of the RIT community are invited and encouraged to attend of these events. Mark your calendars now for the Tiger Walk at 1:30 p.m. and the Convocation for New Students and Families at 2 p.m. on Wednesday, August 17, and the President’s Address to the Community at 9 a.m. on Friday, August 19.

Brick City Homecoming and Family Weekend – Oct. 14-16

graphic representation of RIT buildings with Brick City Homecoming & Family Weekend typed below

Brick City Homecoming and Family Weekend will take place Oct. 14-16, 2016 on the RIT campus. Featured events include RIT Hockey, Presidents’ Alumni Ball and SG Horton Distinguished Speaker Series featuring Brandon Stanton (Humans of New York). Registration opens in late July. Visit the Brick City website or text BRICKCITY to 888777 to receive alerts as soon as registration opens. #BrickCity2016

RIT/NTID receives Motorola Solutions Foundation Innovation Generation Grant

Two smiling female students, one with dark hair and the other light hair and glasses holding a toy robotics vehicle.

Rochester Institute of Technology’s National Technical Institute for the Deaf today announced it has received a grant for $30,000 as part of the “Innovation Generation Grant” program from the Motorola Solutions Foundation, the charitable arm of Motorola Solutions, Inc. Through the grant, RIT/NTID will fund their Tech Girlz and Tech Boyz outreach programs.

The Innovation Generation program provides awards to organizations that foster and support science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) initiatives for teachers and students (U.S. preschool through university level) — especially girls and underrepresented minorities.

Tech Girlz and Tech Boyz are week-long summer camps offered to deaf and hard-of-hearing students entering 7th, 8th and 9th grades who are interested in science, technology, engineering and math. They are taught in English and sign language and offer participants hands-on opportunities to explore technology, build robots and personal computers, and more.

“We are grateful for Motorola Solutions Foundation’s generous support of our outreach tech programs,” said Dr. Gerard Buckley, NTID president and RIT vice president and dean. “These camps provide opportunities for young deaf and hard-of-hearing students to explore careers that they may not have realized were available to them.”

Motorola has been a leader in supporting RIT/NTID’s academic and outreach programs, and this is the fourth time they have helped fund the Tech Girlz and Tech Boyz programs. Since 1984, Motorola Solutions has provided more than $1,000,000 in funding to various RIT and NTID programs.

The Motorola Solutions Foundation grant program overall will impact about 1 million students and teachers this year, each receiving an average of 120 programming hours from partner non-profit organizations and institutions. Programs support special populations, including girls and women; underrepresented minorities; the lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender community; people with disabilities; and the military. 

“The Motorola Solutions Foundation created the Innovation Generation Grant program nine years ago to support educational experiences that spark students to turn their dreams into innovations that will shape our society’s future,” said Matt Blakely, executive director of the Motorola Solutions Foundation. “Organizations like RIT/NTID are teaching tomorrow’s leaders that careers in engineering and technology are both fun and within their reach.”

For additional information on the Motorola Solutions Foundation grants programs, visit: http://responsibility.motorolasolutions.com/index.php/solutions-for-community/ and for more information on RIT/NTID please visit www.ntid.rit.edu

EYF offers students something new

Two students doing a lab experiment

Deaf and hard-of-hearing students from all over the country attend Explore Your Furutre each year and enjoy hands-on experiences with various careers. This summer camp also gives participants a taste of college life and the opportunity to make new friends. On the final day of camp, a parent workshop offers families the chance to ask questions about admissions and financial aid as well as take a campus tour. More

Brick City Speaker Announced

Young man in blue t-shirt backward baseball cap stand on NY street

Brandon Stanton, the man who created the popular Humans of New York blog and books depicting portraits of life and individuals in New York City, will be this year’s Student Government Horton Distinguished Speaker during Rochester Institute of Technology’s Brick City Homecoming & Family Weekend, Oct. 14-16.

Stanton’s Humans of New York, which has more than 22.5 million followers on Facebook and Instagram, said it all began as a photography project in 2010, with a goal to photograph 10,000 New Yorkers on the street as a catalog of the city’s residents.

Stanton’s talk will be 2-3 p.m. on Saturday, Oct. 15, at the Gordon Field House. Tickets are $5 for RIT students; $10 for RIT faculty, staff, alumni and families; and $15 for the public. Tickets are available at the Brick City Homecoming website, https://www.rit.edu/brickcity/ or at University Arenas Box Office.

The weekend typically draws 17,000 participants to RIT’s campus and the Rochester area. It features more than 100 events during three days, including notable speakers and men and women’s hockey games.

“We have a plethora of new and exciting activities planned for everyone at this year’s family weekend,” said Lynn Rowoth, assistant vice president of special events and director of Brick City Homecoming. “With a wide array of speakers, tours, reunions, athletic events and so much more, the appeal is broad to intrigue and attract our students, parents, families, alumni, staff, faculty and guests.”

Visit the Brick City Homecoming & Family Weekend website for updates.

RIT/NTID students graduate with accolades

eight students with President Buckley holding award plaques.

Several students at Rochester Institute of Technology’s National Technical Institute for the Deaf were honored with their families and friends at an academic awards ceremony May 20. NTID President and RIT Vice President and Dean Gerry Buckley hosted the ceremony.

The graduates who received awards are:

·         Marissa Woodruff, an applied liberal arts major from Binghamton, N.Y., received the Academic Achievement Award for students earning an associate degree.

·         Nathan Scott, an applied arts and science major from Schenectady N.Y., received the Academic Achievement Award for students earning a bachelor’s degree.

·         Kyle Murbach, a computing security major from Wheaton, Ill., received the Academic Achievement Award for students earning a master’s degree.

·         Caitlyn Alana Lacerra, a business technology major from Marlborough, Mass., and Leslie Williams, a laboratory science technology major from Harwood Heights, Ill., received the Outstanding Graduate Award for students earning associate degrees.

·         Natalie Snyder, a biomedical sciences major from Rockville, Md., received the Outstanding Graduate Award for students earning a bachelor’s degree.

·         Courtney Kellogg, a graduate student in chemistry from Lake Waukomis, Mo., received the Outstanding Graduate Award for students earning a master’s degree.

·         Hunter Ekberg, an ASL-English interpreting major from Coon Rapids, Minn., received the Outstanding Graduate Award for interpreting students earning a bachelor’s degree.

·         Leslie Williams, a laboratory science technology major from Harwood Heights, Ill., is the 2016 NTID college delegate for undergraduate students.

·         Chloe Ho, a graduate student from Hong Kong enrolled in the secondary education of students who are deaf or hard of hearing program, is the 2016 NTID college delegate for graduate students.

 

Other students who had recent achievements include: Chelsea Behrens, an ASL-English interpreting major from West Islip, N.Y.; Eliza Fowler, an ASL-English interpreting major from Hyde Park, Vt.; Rebecca Lucas, an ASL-English interpreting major from Schenectady, N.Y.; and Hunter Ekberg, an ASL-English interpreting major from Coon Rapids, Minn., were all named RIT Outstanding Undergraduate Scholars.

RIT’s President Destler announces 2017 retirement

RIT President Destler in brown suit and orange striped tie standing in front of podium with RIT seal and microphones.

William W. Destler, Rochester Institute of Technology’s ninth president, announced today (May 9, 2016) that he will retire at the end of the 2016-2017 academic year. Destler’s career in higher education has spanned more than 40 years, with his last decade serving as RIT’s leader.

“It has been a privilege to lead RIT alongside such great students, faculty, staff and alumni,” Destler said. “I credit RIT’s transformation into one of the world’s great universities to them. I am proud to have been along for the ride.”

A nationwide search for a successor will begin immediately.

Under Destler’s leadership, RIT’s enrollment has reached record levels, selectivity and diversity have improved, the value of research awards has skyrocketed and geographic draw continues to widen across the U.S. and overseas.

Destler accomplished his vision of turning RIT into one of the most innovative universities in the world. The Imagine RIT: Innovation and Creativity Festival has attracted more than 250,000 visitors to campus since it launched in 2008, and RIT can boast about award-winning programs in a host of uncommon disciplines, including packaging science, computational astrophysics, sustainability and interactive games and media.

During his tenure, the Carnegie Classification of Institutions of Higher Education reclassified RIT as a doctoral university, reflecting the rapid increase in the number of Ph.D. degrees the university grants each year; RIT’s ninth college, the College of Health Sciences and Technology, launched; the Vignelli Center for Design Studies opened; the Golisano Institute for Sustainability created the world’s first Ph.D. program focused on sustainable production; and RIT was among the first universities in the country to create a department dedicated to computing security.

Destler also helped make RIT a greener campus. Since 2008, RIT has opened three LEED certified buildings, including the first building in Monroe County to be certified LEED Platinum by the U.S. Green Building Council and a state-of-the-art green facility for the Golisano Institute for Sustainability. Last year, RIT took another step toward carbon neutrality by opening a massive solar energy farm.

Destler, who became president of RIT on July 1, 2007, and his spouse, Rebecca Johnson, expanded RIT’s relationship with the community. Destler and Johnson created the Rochester City Scholars program, which gives Rochester City School District graduates who meet certain requirements free full tuition to attend RIT. RIT also partnered with Uncommon Schools to develop a charter high school in Rochester.

“Rebecca and I have been proud to make Rochester our home,” Destler said. “This has been an amazing journey for both of us.”

In a memo to the RIT community, Destler added: “These years at RIT have been the most fulfilling of my professional career. To all of you, I offer my heartfelt thanks for your friendship, for your ideas, and for your steadfast service to RIT and our students.”

Christine Whitman, chairman of the RIT Board of Trustees, said Destler has positioned RIT well for the future and that growth will continue as the 2015-2025 strategic plan is deployed.

“RIT is leading the way in preparing our diverse student body for the rewarding jobs of the future while equipping them with the skills to become good citizens of our world,” Whitman said. “Under Dr. Destler’s leadership, every measurable indicator is up. RIT is having high impact and is recognized both nationally and internationally.”

Destler came to RIT from the University of Maryland at College Park, where he spent more than 30 years, rising from the ranks of research associate and assistant professor of electrical engineering to senior vice president for academic affairs and provost.

He is an international authority on high-power microwave sources and advanced accelerator concepts and one of the world’s foremost collectors of antique banjos.

RIT Presidents:

Carleton B. Gibson: 1910-1916

James F. Barker: 1916-1919

Royal B. Farnum: 1919-1921

John A. Randall: 1922-1936

Mark Ellingson: 1936-1969

Paul A. Miller: 1969-1979

M. Richard Rose: 1979-1992

Albert J. Simone: 1992-2007

William W. Destler: 2007-2017

Winners of the Next Big Idea 2-16

Winners of The Next Big Idea 2016

Update

On Wednesday, May 4, judges from ZVRS, sponsor of The Next Big Idea Competition, reviewed projects of the six finalists, asked questions and selected the folloing winners:

$5,000  First Place:      Team Ugyo; Ethan Young and Nicole Dugan

$3,000  Second Place   Team Dalmation; Adam Brodak, Keith Delk and Jefrey Spinale

$2,000  Third Place       Team ANOVA; Musab Al-Smadi, Michelle Chi, Steven McClusky, Radhika Mehra

 

_______________________________________________

Six teams of deaf and hard-of-hearing students from Rochester Institute of Technology’s National Technical Institute for the Deaf will go head-to-head May 4 during The Next Big Idea competition.

The contest—6:30 to 10 p.m. in NTID’s Panara Theatre, Lyndon Baines Johnson Hall—is an annual event where teams of students combine skills related to their individual majors to create products, technology or businesses that will be useful to the deaf and hard-of-hearing community. Teams work with mentors on their projects and compete before judges for cash prizes. The event is sponsored by ZVRS, a video relay company.

This year marks the fifth anniversary of The Next Big Idea.

Student teams are:

  • Anova— a voice-to-text translation system for deaf and hard-of-hearing individuals that uses a mini processor and microphone.
  • Asymtotic—incorporates microphones, tactile feedback, pulsation and sound filters that vibrate to engage the wearer in important situations.
  • Dalmation—a software service that focuses on providing jobs, volunteering opportunities, networking and resources for the American Sign Language community.
  • Douror—a service app for deaf and hard-of-hearing patrons that helps with placing food orders.
  • Echo—a speech-therapy mobile app that allows users to practice speech and give instantaneous feedback to speech therapists.
  • Ugyo—an access-technology prototype for deaf-blind people with Usher Syndrome to improve communication with peers during meetings or other interactive settings.

“Every year the excitement around this competition builds,” said Gerry Buckley, NTID president and RIT vice president and dean. “Amazing projects are presented and some of them move quickly into the marketplace. We thank ZVRS for their support, and are grateful for the belief they have in our students.”

The event—free and open to the public—will be fully accessible for both deaf and hearing audiences. For more information, contact ntidoutreach@rit.edu.

RIT/NTID teams to compete for the chance to call their inventions ‘The Next Big Idea’

students presenting in front of large audience with two large display screens behind them.

Six teams of deaf and hard-of-hearing students from Rochester Institute of Technology’s National Technical Institute for the Deaf will go head-to-head May 4 during The Next Big Idea competition.

The contest—6:30 to 10 p.m. in NTID’s Panara Theatre, Lyndon Baines Johnson Hall—is an annual event where teams of students combine skills related to their individual majors to create products, technology or businesses that will be useful to the deaf and hard-of-hearing community. Teams work with mentors on their projects and compete before judges for cash prizes. The event is sponsored by ZVRS, a video relay company.

This year marks the fifth anniversary of The Next Big Idea.

Student teams are:

  • Anova— a voice-to-text translation system for deaf and hard-of-hearing individuals that uses a mini processor and microphone.
  • Asymtotic—incorporates microphones, tactile feedback, pulsation and sound filters that vibrate to engage the wearer in important situations.
  • Dalmation—a software service that focuses on providing jobs, volunteering opportunities, networking and resources for the American Sign Language community.
  • Douror—a service app for deaf and hard-of-hearing patrons that helps with placing food orders.
  • Echo—a speech-therapy mobile app that allows users to practice speech and give instantaneous feedback to speech therapists.
  • Ugyo—an access-technology prototype for deaf-blind people with Usher Syndrome to improve communication with peers during meetings or other interactive settings.

“Every year the excitement around this competition builds,” said Gerry Buckley, NTID president and RIT vice president and dean. “Amazing projects are presented and some of them move quickly into the marketplace. We thank ZVRS for their support, and are grateful for the belief they have in our students.”

The event—free and open to the public—will be fully accessible for both deaf and hearing audiences. For more information, contact ntidoutreach@rit.edu.