Category Archives: Employers

Nearly 400 Students Attend RIT/NTID Job Fair

at left is a young man with cochlear implant signing to Sam Sandoval in red short with Harris corp. sign and display table

Representatives from more than 45 local and national corporations, federal agencies and non-profit organizations met with nearly 400 deaf and hard-of-hearing students—who are also prospective employees—at the 15th annual job fair on Oct. 21 at Rochester Institute of Technology’s National Technical Institute for the Deaf. The event was held in Lyndon Baines Johnson Hall on the RIT campus.

Company representatives conducted “on the spot” interviews with NTID students who are vying for cooperative education positions or full-time employment after graduation in fields such as business, finance, graphic design, engineering, computing, and more. Interpreters were available at each table, and in many cases, the company recruiters were NTID alumni. Companies included Microsoft Corp., Lockheed Martin, Defense Finance and Accounting Service, Central Intelligence Agency, U.S. Department of Defense, Dow Chemical Co., Excellus BlueCross Blue Shield, Harris Corp., The Learning Center for the Deaf, The Bank of New York Mellon Corp., and the University of Tennessee-Knoxville, among others. Employers also had the opportunity to participate in a panel discussion.

Maya Ariel, a 2012 business management graduate from RIT’s Saunders College of Business, attended the job fair as a recruiter for the Defense Finance and Accounting Service. As a former student, Ariel was selected shortly after graduation for the organization’s Leaders in Motion program, a development program in which participants rotate through four different departments at DFAS before being permanently placed. Today, she is a financial systems analyst and returned to NTID’s Job Fair to search for future employees in the accounting, finance, human resources or information technology fields.

“My advice for students is to keep all of their options open, take advantage of every opportunity they can, and get a foot in the door,” said Ariel. “I’m a proud RIT graduate and based on my experience, I know these students are well prepared to enter the job market.”

Joao Paulo, a second-year accounting technology student from Brazil, was searching for a co-op placement during the job fair. He said he was nervous at first, but was able to relax and put his best foot forward.

“I came to the job fair for the first time today and I didn’t know what to expect,” said Paulo. “I just tried to be myself and worked my way through it. I spoke with about seven different companies, including Prudential and The Hartford, which both seemed like good matches. I made my way through the tables and I tried really hard to make a good impression and be relaxed yet excited at the same time.”

Samuel Sandoval, a 2013 information technology graduate from Golisano College of Computing and Information Sciences, returned for the second time as a recruiter for Harris Corp. He told students to be persistent.

“The employees at Harris Corp. didn’t really have much exposure to deaf culture,” he said. “Now, in addition to my job as a software engineer, I teach a sign language class to the employees every Monday.”

NTID’s Center on Employment also recognized three companies who consistently hire deaf and hard-of-hearing individuals. One of this year’s local honorees was The Gleason Works.

Alicia Kalen, a human resources generalist at The Gleason Works, has worked with NTID computer integrated machining technology students as part of their summer internship program.

“This has been a very positive experience,” said Kalen. “We have established a relationship with NTID and our goal is to create a talent pipeline for advanced manufacturing positions at Gleason. The students are graduating with an excellent foundation in machining, blue print reading and geometric dimensioning and tolerancing. They learn how to work as a team—toward the same goal—and they have a good idea how a company is run. Today, I met students who are friends with five students who worked for Gleason last summer. The good word is spreading and Gleason is excited and happy to be here.”

Other companies recognized were Purple Communications, headquartered in Rocklin, Calif., and Seattle, Wash.; and University of California—San Diego (Moores Cancer Center).

“We have many deaf and hard-of-hearing alumni employer representatives who attended the job fair who are role models for our students and recent graduates,” said John Macko, director of NTID’s Center on Employment. “The NTID Job Fair allows these alumni to connect with our students and to demonstrate what it takes to be successful in the workplace. Employers continue to want highly qualified employees who bring the necessary skills and who will fit into the company culture and contribute to the company’s success.”

RIT Part of Consortium that Wins Bid for Multi-Million Dollar Photonics Center

A New York-based consortium, led by SUNY Polytechnic, Rochester Institute of Technology and the University of Rochester, has been awarded a multimillion-dollar federal investment to create a national photonics center. The new institute will be called AIM, short for American Institute for Manufacturing Integrated Photonics.

Photonics is the use of light, more specifically photons, to do many of the things that now use electrical circuits. It’s a field closely related to optics which involves the generation, detection and modulation of light.

Ryne Raffaelle, RIT vice president for research and associate provost, said advanced developments in integrated photonics are essential to the nation’s manufacturing capabilities in such areas as high-speed data and telecommunications. He said technologies developed at this national center would allow for more information to be transmitted far more efficiently.

Raffaelle said RIT is expected to support the institute’s work through workforce development, including short continuing education courses that use the university’s laboratories as well as its undergraduate and graduate programs, including a bachelor’s and master’s programs in microelectronic engineering, master’s programs in manufacturing and mechanical systems integration, telecommunications engineering technology, electrical engineering, computer engineering and imaging sciences, as well as its Ph.D. in microsystems engineering. More

RIT Announces Investments in Magic Spell Studios

Gov. Andrew Cuomo came to RIT to announce that the state will contribute $12 million toward construction of MAGIC Spell Studios, adding to $3 million from Dell and $12.4 million from Cisco Systems for the project.

Rochester Institute of Technology is at the epicenter of a public-private partnership that could catapult the region as a leader in the rapidly growing digital media industry. The college announced $12 million in funding from New York state, $3 million from Dell and $12.4 million from Cisco Systems Inc. that will be used to grow MAGIC Spell Studios, a university program that will link RIT’s internationally ranked academic programs with high-tech facilities needed to commercialize computer gaming, film and animation, graphic design and imaging sciences projects. That money will be added to the $1.5 million RIT has already received through the Finger Lakes Regional Economic Development Council, which named MAGIC Spell Studios as a priority project. More.

RIT/NTID Engineering Students Create 3D Printed Parts for a Drone

A collaboration between Steven Forney, an alumnus working as a research associate at University of Alabama at Huntsville and Gary Behm, one of his former professors at RIT resulted in Behm’s Manufacturing Processes class of RIT/NTID engineering students experiencing an exciting real-world work experience.

Steven Forney, began a 3D CAD venture with the students to benefit an on-going project he has developed—taking a drone with him to demonstrate the engineering technology at schools and other colleges. Forney needed to assemble and disassemble the drone each time he traveled with it—a tedious process. Behm saw an opportunity for his class to work with Forney as an actual customer, on an engineering project. The expected outcome was that the drone could be changed from a ready-to-fly mode to a travel-accessible mode in a significantly less amount of time than currently was required.

Behm and Forney set up the project so that Forney and the students could meet via Skype. There, Forney outlined his real-world work requirements—writing a technical document, understanding the customer’s requirements, and understanding the scope of the project. Each team sketched three different designs relating to a travel-friendly retractable and/or quick disconnect system for the drone. After Forney’s approval on one design for each team, the students began sketching with the 3D computer aided drafting technology and created actual plastic parts using the 3D printer in the Department of Engineering Studies for the drone that would make it more easily transportable for Forney. Wendy Dannels, who teaches the 3D CAD course, supported the students with their 3D drawings.

“Each team will deliver their prototype adaptor, engineering documents and poster at the semester’s end,” says Behm. 

Forney is pleased with the work on a solution to his travel woes. “Also, I was happy that the student teams were excited about the project and excited that they got to keep their 3D printed parts,” says Forney. He will use the students’ prototype solutions to assist him in building a final adapter for his drone.