Category Archives: Employers

RIT/NTID job fair connects deaf students with employers across the country

Light skinned man on left with cochlear implant wearing suit chats with darker skinned man on right in red golf shirt, tan pants

Representatives from more than 40 local and national corporations, federal agencies and nonprofit organizations will meet with hundreds of deaf and hard-of-hearing students at the 17th annual job fair, 12:30–4 p.m. on Wednesday, Oct. 18, at Rochester Institute of Technology’s National Technical Institute for the Deaf. The event will be held in Lyndon Baines Johnson Hall on the RIT campus.

“Employers will have the opportunity to recruit talented deaf and hard-of-hearing students in associate and bachelor’s degree programs such as business, finance, graphic design, engineering, computing and more,” said John Macko, director of NTID’s Center on Employment.

Interpreters will be available, and in many cases, the company recruiters are RIT/NTID alumni. Companies registered to attend the fair include Caterpillar, Communication Service for the Deaf, Defense Finance and Accounting Service, FDIC, Ingalls Shipbuilding, Merck, Naval Supply Systems Command Weapon Systems Support, Prudential and Texas Instruments, among others. 

“Employers continue to want highly qualified employees who bring the necessary skills and who will fit into the company culture and contribute to the company’s success,” added Macko. “Our students are well-trained and can hit the ground running at companies right here in Rochester and all over the country.”

There are a few openings available for employers who want to participate. For more information, email Mary Ellen Tait or call 585-475-6426. 

What: 17th annual NTID Job Fair
Where: Lyndon Baines Johnson Hall, Rochester Institute of Technology

When: 12:30-4 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 18

Details: More than 40 local and national corporations, federal agencies and nonprofit organizations will be on campus to recruit deaf and hard-of-hearing students and graduates for co-op and full-time positions.

RIT/NTID and EPA ink development of cooperative program

A woman and two men sit facing a large monitor screen. An interpreter is to the screen's right. the screen shows people at desk.

Deaf and hard-of-hearing students attending Rochester Institute of Technology’s National Technical Institute for the Deaf will benefit from enhanced educational and career opportunities in the environmental sciences, thanks to a memorandum of understanding (MOU) between the college and the Environmental Protection Agency.

The MOU was formalized during a “virtual” signing ceremony Sept. 12, with representatives from both RIT/NTID and the EPA connecting through live video conferencing.

The purpose of the MOU is to increase cooperation between RIT/NTID and the EPA in areas of mutual interest, including promoting equal opportunity in higher education, contributing to RIT/NTID’s capacity to provide high-quality education, and encouraging the participation of RIT/NTID in EPA programs.

Activities being considered as part of this partnership include:

  • Inviting RIT/NTID faculty and student participation in public policy forums, presentations, seminars and other events at the EPA.
  • The EPA participating in career fairs and other outreach to RIT/NTID students, faculty and alumni regarding EPA employment opportunities.
  • The EPA providing assistance to RIT/NTID for the advancement of environmental education by distance learning technology.
  • EPA representatives participating in lectures, webinars, conferences and other events at RIT/NTID.

“The federal government has been a strong advocate for equal employment opportunities for all individuals, including deaf and hard-of-hearing Americans,” said Gerry Buckley, NTID president and RIT vice president and dean. “We are so pleased to be partnering with the EPA on behalf of our students.”

The parties plan to establish a program committee consisting of representatives of RIT/NTID and the EPA to manage implementation of the memorandum. The EPA has designated EPA Region 2, headquartered in New York City, to administer the MOU on behalf of the EPA, working with other EPA offices, regions and laboratories as appropriate. RIT/NTID’s Center on Employment will administer on behalf of the college.

Representatives participating in the signing were, from the EPA: Bisa Cunningham, director, Diversity, Recruitment & Employee Services Division; Richard J. Manna, assistant regional administrator, EPA Region 2; Jon Gabry, branch chief, Division of Environmental Science and Assessment, Hazardous Waste Support Branch, EPA Region 2; Colin “Mark” Oldland, disability employment program manager, Office of Policy and Management, EPA Region 2; Christopher Emanuel, EEO manager/Disability Employment Program, Office of Civil Rights, Affirmative Employment, Analysis and Accountability; Johahna Johnson, Civil Rights and Finance Law Office, Office of General Counsel; Tania L. Allen, chief, Diversity & Recruitment Branch Diversity, Recruitment & Employee Services Division; and Anthony Napoli, diversity and inclusion program manager of the Diversity, Recruitment & Employee Services Division. Gerard Buckley, NTID president and RIT vice president and dean; John Macko, director of RIT/NTID’s Center on Employment; and Shyrl Scalice, assistant director and employment adviser, RIT/NTID’s Center on Employment, represented the college.

Working Together marks a milestone of 1,000th workshop

John Macko stands in front of a u-shaped desk surrounded by people. Interpreter at the center. In foreground computer screen.

Working Together: Deaf and Hearing People, an interactive workshop to help employers integrate deaf and hard-of-hearing employees, has reached a milestone, celebrating 33 years and 1,000 workshop presentations.

The program, created by the Center on Employment at the National Technical Institute for the Deaf, was designed to offer customizable training to help employers feel comfortable hiring deaf and hard-of-hearing individuals. The sessions also give hearing participants information and hands-on experience to build their own strategies for working with deaf employees and being sensitive to their needs.

Workshop topics are offered to supervisors, human resource professionals and co-workers of deaf and hard-of-hearing employees. They include communication strategies, safety in the workplace, particularly in science-based or manufacturing companies, and a review of accommodations that might be necessary for employees.

According to center Director John Macko, there has been an increase in requests for workshops about new technologies that are available for deaf and hard-of-hearing employees and their co-workers.

“Much has changed over the past 30 years when it comes to working and communicating with deaf people,” said Macko. “Today there are so many technologies and devices that facilitate communication and make it easier for hearing people to communicate with deaf and hard-of-hearing people, and vice versa. Our program is unique because we can tailor it to fully address the needs of the employers we serve.”

Workshop presentation teams—usually consisting of one hearing person and one deaf person—also teach employers about deaf culture and use hearing-loss simulation demonstrations and listening exercises to give participants a sense of what it’s like to be deaf.

Macko said the center coordinates about 30 workshops each year throughout the country, and team members visit companies of varying sizes, including Walt Disney Co., JP Morgan Chase, Huntington Ingalls Industries, Lockheed Martin, Merck, Tiffany and Co., Proctor and Gamble, and others. The 1,000th workshop was held at the Portsmouth Naval Shipyard in Maine.

This program also has a positive impact on these employers for hiring NTID students and graduates for co-op and full time positions, Macko said. The workshops also help establish valuable relationships with companies, many of which return to NTID to recruit at the annual job fair.

“When we visit these companies to present our workshops, we also talk with them about the quality of our NTID students—tout their interpersonal skills, their motivation and dedication and the overall high employability of our students and graduates. We have the kind of students that employers want to hire.”

Knowing the Basics Pays Off

Student with baseball cap, mustache and blue shirt posing at Job Fair

Connor Fitzgerald, a student from from Lennon, Michigan, had a co-op as a machinist at Gleason Works in Rochester, New York. He had learned the basics and more in his Computer Intergrated Machining Technology classes and was able to apply his knowledge to the job right away. Connor was offered a full-time job at Gleason Works, which he accepted and he's on his way to a bright future. more

RIT named by U.S. Dept. of Energy to lead new Manufacturing USA Institute on clean energy

Image of four-story building illuminated at dusk.

Rochester Institute of Technology’s Golisano Institute for Sustainability was selected by the U.S. Department of Energy, as part of its Manufacturing USA initiative, to lead its new Reducing Embodied-Energy and Decreasing Emissions (REMADE) Institute—a national coalition of leading universities and companies that will forge new clean energy initiatives deemed critical in keeping U.S. manufacturing competitive. More.

The value of networking during break

The value of networking during break

by John Macko

Director, NTID Center on Employment

While RIT is on break until January 23, there are some things your student can do during that time to plan for the future, and one of them is networking to find a co-op or permanent job. It’s a fact that one of the best ways to find jobs is networking, as statistics show between 75 and 80 percent of jobs are found that way. Many jobs are not advertised to the general public and may only be known by the people working at the company. These jobs, called the hidden job market, are often found through networking.

Students should take advantage of winter break to make contacts. It’s the perfect opportunity to reach out to folks at home about connections they may have that are relevant to your son’s or daughter’s interests. And building their network now will help in the job search after graduation.

Here are a few ways you could be helpful to your student and become part of his or her network:

  1. Network with people you know to provide some leads for your student. Your contacts can be at work, at the athletic club or gym, or even friends and neighbors—whomever you think might be a possible employment contact.
  2.  Encourage your son or daughter to contact at least two people over break.

For information about networking strategies for your student, visit http://www.ntid.rit.edu/nce/students/networking.

A Career in Biotechnology

Female student with wavy brown hair wearing a lab coat and smiling standing outside of a lab with lab tables and equipment in th

Michelle Mailhot, a lab science technology major from West Newfield, Maine, spent her summer on co-op at the Merck High-Throughput Screening Facility in North Wales, Pennsylvania. Her co-op, the LST program and all of the courses she has taken and the instrumentation skills she’s developed  will provide a strong foundation for her success in RIT’s College of Science.