Category Archives: Success Stories

Cool Co-op: La Shea Murray

Female student sitting and working at computer desk.

La Shea Murray from Feasterville, Pennsylvania is a design and imaging technology major working her co-op at RMS Graphics in Huntingdon Valley, Pennsylvania. In her position as a graphic design technician intern, she works with the art director to make, modify and produce designs for various commercial printed materials using Adobe software, and assists with putting together custom fulfillment kits.

Cool Co-ops: Samantha Abert

female student sitting at compuer with colorful Crayola products

Samantha Abert, a design and imaging technology major from Emmaus, Pennsylvania, is a graphic production intern at Crayloa, LLC, in Easton, Pennsylvania. She is part of a creative team that focuses on the development and use of creative tools like crayons, pencils, markers and clay. Part of her job is to research craft ideas and create artwork with Crayola products that the company could use on social media as examples of what consumers can make with those products. She also created concept sketches for colored pencils packaging.

RIT/NTID celebrates growing number of Ph.D. candidates

Madeline Beach in black cap and gown with pink lei around her neck standing next to Peter Hauser in blue cap and gown at podium

Rochester Institute of Technology’s National Technical Institute for the Deaf is honoring deaf and hard-of-hearing graduates who will continue on to earn doctoral degrees in science, technology, engineering or mathematics (STEM) disciplines.

Four RIT/NTID students were enrolled in the Rochester Bridges to the Doctorate program— in partnership with University of Rochester and funded by a grant from the National Institute for General Medical Science—that is helping to fill the gap that exists when it comes to deaf and hard-of-hearing students earning doctoral degrees in science disciplines.

Up to three graduate students are selected each year for entry into the Bridges program. Most of their tuition is paid, and they also earn experience—and a paycheck—working in laboratories at RIT and UR. Throughout the program, they meet regularly with mentors who help prepare them for the academic rigors of earning a doctorate, attend at least two professional conferences and complete three research rotations at UR laboratories.

“We are proud of the accomplishments of these students, who are advancing toward their doctoral degrees and making meaningful contributions to scholarly research,” said Dr. Gerard Buckley, NTID president and RIT vice president and dean. “They are role models for deaf and hard-of-hearing undergraduate students interested in STEM disciplines.”

            The students being honored through the Bridges to the Doctorate program:
            • Lorne Farovitch (Vancouver, Wash.), graduated with a master’s degree in environmental science and will attend University of Rochester Medical Center to earn a Ph.D. in translational biomedical science.
            • Madeline Beach (Aurora, Ill.), graduated with a master’s degree in applied statistics and will attend Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis to earn a Ph.D. in biostatistics.
            • Jessica Contreras (Eagle River, Alaska), graduated with a master’s degree in experimental psychology and will attend the University of Connecticut to earn a Ph.D. in developmental psychology.
            • Gloria Wink (Rochester, N.Y.) graduated with a master’s degree in environmental science and will attend University of Rochester Medical Center to earn a Ph.D. in epidemiology.

Other RIT/NTID graduates who are continuing on to earn advanced degrees:
            • Natalie Snyder (Rockville, Md.) graduated with a bachelor’s degree in biomedical science, with minors in exercise science and psychology, and will attend University of Maryland Eastern Shore to earn a Doctor of Physical Therapy degree.
            • Courtney Kellogg (Lake Waukomis, Mo.) graduated with a master’s degree in chemistry and will attend University of Rochester Medical Center to earn a Ph.D. in Pathways of Human Disease.
For more information about the Bridges to the Doctorate program, go to http://deafscientists.com/

Gaining Business Knowledge on Co-op

Female student with Caterpillar heavy equipment in the background

Marlet Mancera’s co-op experience as a corporate accounting intern at Caterpiller taught her many things among which are that employers value excellence, commitment and teamwork. Her RIT courses helped her develop skills in Microsoft Office, Excel and other software related to her business and accounting interests. She is sure that her business administrations degree and accounting training will guide her to a successful future. 

From co-op to career

Christopher Robinson wearing glasses, bright green golf shirt holding safety glasses standing with CNC machinery

Name:  Christopher Brown

Hometown

Baton Rouge, Louisiana

Degree programs

A.O.S., Computer Integrated Machining Technology, 2016

Year of graduation

2016

Place of employment

Place of employment Cyromech, Syracuse, New York

Job Title

Computer numeric control (CNC) operator

Work Responsibilities

Some of my responsibilities were to use blueprints to create precision products on the CNC machine. I set controls; inspected machines; and scheduled maintenance and repair to ensure operation, quality standards and correct specifications.

How my career relates to my degree from RIT/NTID

I learned much about blueprints, following directions, working on several products at once and how to use a variety of other machines: HASS lathe, manual lathe and mill and turning machines. My co-op gave me relevant work experience and helped me develop my knowledge and skills. At RIT/NTID, I learned time management, assertiveness, persistence and to work with deadlines. These skills helped me to succeed on co-op and will help me succeed in life as well. I appreciate the experience I got on the CNC mill machine because that was really valuable on my co-op. And, I have accepted a full-time job with Cryomech for after graduation.

Advice

Be responsible, be prepared, be assertive, be persistent and don’t give up. Fight for what you believe in and don’t let anything or anyone get you down. Maintain a positive attitude and stay motivated. Stay safe and avoid risky behavior. Most of all, grab your opportunity.

2016 Leadership Award winners

Leadership Award winners

Elizabeth MacLaren is the recipient of the Joseph T. Ferraro Memorial Scholarship, and Jonathan Roman received the Alfred L. and Ruby C. Davis Leadership Award, which also includes a scholarship. Students must be nominated for these awards, which are given annually in the spring. Award recipients have a passion for their work, are involved in campus life and demonstrate leadership skills in their various activities.

RIT/NTID program encourages students to pursue doctoral degrees

Lorne Farovitch with lab coat, gloves and glasses holding bottle with other bottles around him.

A new program at RIT’s National Technical Institute for the Deaf is helping fill the gap that exists when it comes to deaf and hard-of-hearing students earning doctoral degrees in science disciplines.

The Rochester Bridges to the Doctorate program, in partnership with University of Rochester and funded by a grant from the National Institute for General Medical Science, helps eligible students enrolled in master’s programs at RIT prepare and apply for doctoral programs in behavioral or biomedical science.

Up to three graduate students are selected each year for entry into the Bridges program. Most of their tuition is paid, and they also gain experience—and earn a paycheck—working in laboratories at RIT and UR. Throughout the program, they meet regularly with mentors who help prepare them for the academic rigors of earning a doctorate, attend at least two professional conferences and complete three research rotations at UR laboratories. Currently, there are six students enrolled in the Bridges program, and potential students are encouraged to apply.

“This is an amazing opportunity for aspiring deaf and hard-of-hearing scholars who have long been underserved and under-recognized,” said Peter Hauser, principal investigator for RIT and director of the Deaf Studies Laboratory at NTID. “To date, this is the first educational program specifically tailored to deaf and hard-of-hearing scholars who want to pursue advanced degrees. We are proud to have started this program in Rochester, a community characterized by a well-educated and large deaf population, with a unique and collaborative atmosphere.”

Lorne Farovitch, an environmental science master’s degree candidate from Tucson, Ariz., is completing his second year in the Bridges program at RIT/NTID. While he always knew that he wanted to earn his Ph.D., he needed expert advice to help him home in on his specialty.

“Before I entered the Bridges program, I enjoyed internship experiences in polymer science, neuroscience and marine biology,” said Farovitch. “But I was able to find my passion for microbiology and immunology through the Bridges program. I worked with Professor Martin Zand at UR to study lymphocytes and their capability to migrate through the body. My research with Professor Jeff Lodge at RIT allowed me to analyze water samples from Lake Ontario to determine pollution levels from medications that are distributed through open water. I studied how pathogens in water help spread disease, and how these diseases impact our health. My eyes were opened to a variety of skills, all of my questions were answered, and I was able to determine the path that I wanted to take.”

Scott Smith is a research associate professor at NTID and the Bridges program science mentorship director.

“Our Bridges students realize that deaf scholars can be scientists and work successfully with their hearing counterparts,” said Smith. “From professional development and training opportunities to support-group discussions with their peers and mentors, this program provides a personalized education plan to lead them on the path to earning that coveted doctoral degree. We’re teaching them how to become professional scientists.”

For more information on the Rochester Bridges to the Doctorate program, visit: http://deafscientists.com

RIT School of Film and Animation ranked nationally

RIT School of Film and Animation among best in country.

Rochester Institute of Technology’s School of Film and Animation is once again among the top film schools in the country as ranked by Animation Career Review, a leading online source of information for aspiring animation and game design professionals. It received high marks for academic reputation; admission selectivity; the program’s depth, breadth and faculty; value as it relates to tuition; and geographic location. SOFA program offerings include a BFA and MFA in film and animation, and a BS degree in motion picture science, giving RIT one of the broadest curriculum choices in the country. More.