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RIT Recognized for High Number of Physics Graduates

23 Nov

RIT College of Science

Rochester Institute of Technology has been recognized for being among the universities conferring the largest number of undergraduate physics degrees, according to the American Institute of Physics.

The Physics program in RIT’s College of Science was ranked 20th, with an average of 16 graduates per year. This is the first year RIT has been recognized. Approximately 160 students are enrolled in RIT’s undergraduate Physics program. More.

RIT Offers New Major in Human-centered Computing

20 Nov

Photo by: Julia Prisaznuk

If you’re interested in technology and would like to work in a field that helps improve people’s experiences with technology, check out the new Human-centered Computing major being offered at Rochester Institute of Technology. The program will prepare graduates to advance the ways that people interact with technology.

The bachelor’s degree in Human-centered Computing will combine principles from computing, design and psychology to help students create interfaces to technology with a human focus from beginning to end.

The undergraduate program currently is accepting students and will bring in its first freshman class next fall. More.

Dyer Arts Center Hosts Two New Exhibits

18 Nov

Dyer Arts Center Hosts Two New Exhibits

The Joseph F. and Helen C. Dyer Arts Center at Rochester Institute of Technology’s National Technical Institute for the Deaf hosts two exhibits this fall and winter.

  • “Roots Out of a Dry Ground: The Life and Work of Andrew Foster,” which runs through Dec. 18, is a biographical exhibit of deaf missionary Andrew Foster, who lived and worked in Africa from 1956 until his death in 1987. In 1954, he became the first deaf African American to earn a bachelor’s degree from Gallaudet University and the first to earn a master’s degree from Eastern Michigan University. He founded Christian Mission for the Deaf African in 1956 and established the first school for the deaf in Africa in Ghana.
  • “Unfolding the Soul of Black Deaf Expressions”—a first-of-its-kind exhibit featuring more than 100 works of art from more than 30 Black Deaf artists runs Nov. 14 through Feb. 27. A two-day symposium will be held Feb. 26 and 27. Pieces stem from a variety of artistic media, including paintings, photography and drawings. More

Motivated to Succeed

3 Nov

Motivated to Succeed

Kim Hoang’s co-op at Eagle Ridge Institute provided her with work experience in her field. She hopes eventually to teach Graphic Design and feels confident she has the skills and is well-prepared for that career. More

Nearly 400 Students Attend RIT/NTID Job Fair

22 Oct

at left is a young man with cochlear implant signing to Sam Sandoval in red short with Harris corp. sign and display table

Representatives from more than 45 local and national corporations, federal agencies and non-profit organizations met with nearly 400 deaf and hard-of-hearing students—who are also prospective employees—at the 15th annual job fair on Oct. 21 at Rochester Institute of Technology’s National Technical Institute for the Deaf. The event was held in Lyndon Baines Johnson Hall on the RIT campus.

Company representatives conducted “on the spot” interviews with NTID students who are vying for cooperative education positions or full-time employment after graduation in fields such as business, finance, graphic design, engineering, computing, and more. Interpreters were available at each table, and in many cases, the company recruiters were NTID alumni. Companies included Microsoft Corp., Lockheed Martin, Defense Finance and Accounting Service, Central Intelligence Agency, U.S. Department of Defense, Dow Chemical Co., Excellus BlueCross Blue Shield, Harris Corp., The Learning Center for the Deaf, The Bank of New York Mellon Corp., and the University of Tennessee-Knoxville, among others. Employers also had the opportunity to participate in a panel discussion.

Maya Ariel, a 2012 business management graduate from RIT’s Saunders College of Business, attended the job fair as a recruiter for the Defense Finance and Accounting Service. As a former student, Ariel was selected shortly after graduation for the organization’s Leaders in Motion program, a development program in which participants rotate through four different departments at DFAS before being permanently placed. Today, she is a financial systems analyst and returned to NTID’s Job Fair to search for future employees in the accounting, finance, human resources or information technology fields.

“My advice for students is to keep all of their options open, take advantage of every opportunity they can, and get a foot in the door,” said Ariel. “I’m a proud RIT graduate and based on my experience, I know these students are well prepared to enter the job market.”

Joao Paulo, a second-year accounting technology student from Brazil, was searching for a co-op placement during the job fair. He said he was nervous at first, but was able to relax and put his best foot forward.

“I came to the job fair for the first time today and I didn’t know what to expect,” said Paulo. “I just tried to be myself and worked my way through it. I spoke with about seven different companies, including Prudential and The Hartford, which both seemed like good matches. I made my way through the tables and I tried really hard to make a good impression and be relaxed yet excited at the same time.”

Samuel Sandoval, a 2013 information technology graduate from Golisano College of Computing and Information Sciences, returned for the second time as a recruiter for Harris Corp. He told students to be persistent.

“The employees at Harris Corp. didn’t really have much exposure to deaf culture,” he said. “Now, in addition to my job as a software engineer, I teach a sign language class to the employees every Monday.”

NTID’s Center on Employment also recognized three companies who consistently hire deaf and hard-of-hearing individuals. One of this year’s local honorees was The Gleason Works.

Alicia Kalen, a human resources generalist at The Gleason Works, has worked with NTID computer integrated machining technology students as part of their summer internship program.

“This has been a very positive experience,” said Kalen. “We have established a relationship with NTID and our goal is to create a talent pipeline for advanced manufacturing positions at Gleason. The students are graduating with an excellent foundation in machining, blue print reading and geometric dimensioning and tolerancing. They learn how to work as a team—toward the same goal—and they have a good idea how a company is run. Today, I met students who are friends with five students who worked for Gleason last summer. The good word is spreading and Gleason is excited and happy to be here.”

Other companies recognized were Purple Communications, headquartered in Rocklin, Calif., and Seattle, Wash.; and University of California—San Diego (Moores Cancer Center).

“We have many deaf and hard-of-hearing alumni employer representatives who attended the job fair who are role models for our students and recent graduates,” said John Macko, director of NTID’s Center on Employment. “The NTID Job Fair allows these alumni to connect with our students and to demonstrate what it takes to be successful in the workplace. Employers continue to want highly qualified employees who bring the necessary skills and who will fit into the company culture and contribute to the company’s success.”