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RIT included in 2018 ‘Fiske Guide to Colleges’

18 Jul

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Rochester Institute of Technology is among the universities included in the 2018 edition of the “Fiske Guide to Colleges.” The guide is a selective, subjective and systematic look at more than 300 colleges and universities in the U.S., Canada and Great Britain aimed at selecting “the best and most interesting.”

The 2018 edition of the guide highlights RIT’s “spotlight on undergraduates,” and says “students seeking up-to-date technological preparation will be at home at RIT, and those who are geared up and ready to ‘go professional’ will be more than satisfied with its extensive co-op program.” The guide also cites RIT as “a leader in providing access and support services for deaf and hard-of-hearing students.” More.

Sports Journalism

18 Jul

Male with checked shirt holds pad and pen in a clothing store

Jamaal Brown parlays his writing skills and his passion for being a reporter into a job in digital media for sports business. More

NIH grants $1 million to RIT/NTID scientists-in-training program for deaf and hard-of-hearing undergraduates

14 Jul

Young man with red hair and beard wearing safety glasses and white lab coat works with lab instruments.

The National Institutes of Health’s National Institute of General Medical Sciences has awarded a grant to Rochester Institute of Technology’s National Technical Institute for the Deaf to provide $1.025 million in funding over five years to develop a scientists-in-training program for deaf and hard-of-hearing undergraduates. 

Funded through the Research Initiative for Scientific Enhancement (RISE) program, the grant is designed to increase the number of underrepresented students who enter Ph.D. programs in the biomedical and behavioral sciences. The RIT-RISE program is the first RISE program to specifically serve deaf and hard-of-hearing students.

The program will offer a suite of scientific enrichment workshops, presentations, and activities that are tailored to the needs of deaf-and-hard of hearing scientists and open to the entire university. These events are expected to attract students who wish to enrich their research skills, stay abreast of hot topics in biomedical and behavioral fields, sharpen their presentation skills, or get help applying to graduate schools. RIT-RISE also will provide faculty workshops to share best practices for promoting effective communication between hearing and deaf researchers in lab settings.   

Selected RISE scholars will receive intensive training and wage support for working in research laboratories with RIT researchers and, eventually, in the laboratory of a mentor from another institution.  The RIT-RISE leadership team will help match supported scholars with participating research mentors in their fields of interest. Scholars also will attend local and national conferences, present papers and posters and publish or co-publish their work. 

Scott R. Smith, a medical doctor, health scientist and research faculty member at RIT/NTID, who is deaf, will lead this program assisted by Paul Craig, a chemistry professor and the head of RIT’s School of Chemistry and Material Science, and Vincent Samar, an RIT/NTID cognitive science professor with many years of experience working with deaf and hard-of-hearing students. In addition, more than 40 deaf and hearing members of the RIT faculty have volunteered to serve as science mentors, and 15 deaf and hearing external mentors have already been identified for the summer research experiences that will take place after scholars complete their junior year.

RISE scholars will be selected from deaf and hard-of-hearing students in RIT baccalaureate programs that include biochemistry, bioinformatics, biology, biomedical engineering, biomedical sciences, biotechnology & molecular bioscience, chemistry, computing and information technologies, computer science, computing security, game design & development, human-centered computing, new media interactive development, psychology, and web and mobile computing.

RIT’s National Technical Institute for the Deaf is leading the RIT-RISE cross-college partnership that includes RIT’s College of Science, College of Health Science and Technology, College of Liberal Arts, Golisano College of Computing and Information Sciences, and the Kate Gleason College of Engineering. 

Smith cited the partnership among RIT colleges as one of the keys to receiving NIH support. 

“The strength of the mentor pool helped to distinguish the RIT application, and we are very grateful for faculty enthusiasm for this program,” he said. “We expect the RIT-RISE program to provide even greater opportunities so that deaf and hard-of-hearing students can engage in robust undergraduate research experiences that will enable them to become successful scientists.”  

Gerard Buckley, NTID president and RIT vice president and dean, praised RIT’s commitment to the program. 

“This is a historic development for deaf and hard-of-hearing scholars and for RIT,” said Buckley. “RIT is becoming known as the destination school for deaf and hard-of-hearing scholars who want to prepare for careers in biomedical and behavioral research.”    

The RIT-RISE program expands the Rochester training pipeline for deaf and hard-of-hearing scientists by connecting undergraduate research training with preexisting NTID-supported ‘Explore Your Future’ and ‘Health Care Career Exploration’ camps for high school students, the Rochester Bridges to the Doctorate Program for graduate students, and the Rochester Postdoctoral Partnership Program for postdoctoral fellows.  

EYF: Hands-on Career Exploration

13 Jul

Four students, two with EYF t-shirts, gathered around a computer working on a project

Students enrolled in RIT/NTID’s Explore Your Future program have the opportunity to try hands-on activities related to different careers and get a taste of what those careers might be like. More

 

 

EYF 2017: Exploring Careers

6 Jul

Two male students in lab coats with at a table with bottles of chemicals, tweezers and different powders.

Explore Your Future (EYF), a six day summer career exploration camp, offers deaf and hard-of-hearing high school sophomores and juniors the opportunity to think about careers and make new friends from all over the country. More