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RIT students prepare for annual career fair

3 Oct

Students dressed in professional attire stand in line to meet company recruiters. recruiters

More than 250 employing organizations and nearly 900 recruiter representatives seeking Rochester Institute of Technology students and graduates are attending the RIT Fall 2017 Career Fair on Oct. 4. It will be the largest career fair RIT has hosted. Employers are attending from 30 states, including many from the West Coast. Among the companies attending are General Electric, Bank of America, Microsoft, Cisco, IBM, Amazon, Bose Corp., U.S. Central Intelligence Agency, GEICO, Johnson & Johnson, Lockheed Martin, Paypal, Toyota, Volvo and Xerox. More.

 

 

 

Health Care Careers Camp 2017

26 Jul

Two female students sit behind a model of the human heart with lab instructor and two more students in the background

More than 40 deaf and hard-of-hearing students came to campus with the future in mind to experience different health care related careers. More

EYF: Hands-on Career Exploration

13 Jul

Four students, two with EYF t-shirts, gathered around a computer working on a project

Students enrolled in RIT/NTID’s Explore Your Future program have the opportunity to try hands-on activities related to different careers and get a taste of what those careers might be like. More

 

 

EYF 2017: Exploring Careers

6 Jul

Two male students in lab coats with at a table with bottles of chemicals, tweezers and different powders.

Explore Your Future (EYF), a six day summer career exploration camp, offers deaf and hard-of-hearing high school sophomores and juniors the opportunity to think about careers and make new friends from all over the country. More

Young artists, writers win RIT/NTID’s digital arts, writing competitions

9 May

Artists image of a galloping horse in shades of browns, grays and whites

Rochester Institute of Technology’s National Technical Institute for the Deaf has announced the winners of the annual Digital Arts, Film and Animation Competition for Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing Students. The contest, in its 11th year, generated dozens of entries in graphic media, photo illustration and 3D animation.

The winners of each category, receiving a $250 prize, are:

  • Graphic Media: Gabriel Veit of Austin, Texas, a student at Texas School for the Deaf, for The Wind.
  • Photo Illustration: Zee Grant of Denver, Colo., a student at Rocky Mountain Deaf School, for Snow Life.
  • 3D Animation: Connor Switenky of Frederick, Md., a student at Maryland School for the Deaf, for Phantasma.

The runners-up were:

  • Graphic Media: Jeni Kim of Charleston, S.C., a student at Charleston County School of the Arts, for Color of Silence.
  • Photo Illustration: Samantha Suarez of Jacksonville, Fla., a student at Florida School for the Deaf and Blind, for No Matter What’s Inside, and Nydia Cooper of St. James, La., a student at Ascension Catholic High School, for The River Meets Bayou.

Honorable mentions were:

  • Interactive Media: Denali Thorn of Indianapolis, a student at Indiana School for the Deaf, for UFO Kid.
  • Graphic Media: Grace Kominsky of Mount Wolf, Pa., a student at Northeastern Senior High School, for Instrumental Elephantal Semblance.

The winning entries may be seen at www.rit.edu/ntid/dafac/winners.

High school students in 10th or 11th grades won prizes for the RIT/NTID SpiRIT Writing Contest for Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing Students. Winners have their choice of a scholarship and travel expenses to NTID’s Explore Your Future program, or a $500 cash prize.

Winners of the SpiRIT Writing Contest were Cecilia Gallagher of Bunker Hill, W.V., a student at Musselman High School, for Memories of the Fallen; and Hannah Van Sant of Sully, Iowa, a student at Pella Christian High School, for An Article Gone Awry. Honorable mentions were presented to Anna Kasper of St. Louis Park, Minn., a student at St. Louis Park High School, for Siddhartha’s Detachment; and Lillie Brown of Jacksonville, Ill., a student at Illinois School for the Deaf, for Sixteen is Way Too Young. Says Who?!