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RIT/NTID celebrates growing number of Ph.D. candidates

15 Jul

Madeline Beach in black cap and gown with pink lei around her neck standing next to Peter Hauser in blue cap and gown at podium

Rochester Institute of Technology’s National Technical Institute for the Deaf is honoring deaf and hard-of-hearing graduates who will continue on to earn doctoral degrees in science, technology, engineering or mathematics (STEM) disciplines.

Four RIT/NTID students were enrolled in the Rochester Bridges to the Doctorate program— in partnership with University of Rochester and funded by a grant from the National Institute for General Medical Science—that is helping to fill the gap that exists when it comes to deaf and hard-of-hearing students earning doctoral degrees in science disciplines.

Up to three graduate students are selected each year for entry into the Bridges program. Most of their tuition is paid, and they also earn experience—and a paycheck—working in laboratories at RIT and UR. Throughout the program, they meet regularly with mentors who help prepare them for the academic rigors of earning a doctorate, attend at least two professional conferences and complete three research rotations at UR laboratories.

“We are proud of the accomplishments of these students, who are advancing toward their doctoral degrees and making meaningful contributions to scholarly research,” said Dr. Gerard Buckley, NTID president and RIT vice president and dean. “They are role models for deaf and hard-of-hearing undergraduate students interested in STEM disciplines.”

            The students being honored through the Bridges to the Doctorate program:
            • Lorne Farovitch (Vancouver, Wash.), graduated with a master’s degree in environmental science and will attend University of Rochester Medical Center to earn a Ph.D. in translational biomedical science.
            • Madeline Beach (Aurora, Ill.), graduated with a master’s degree in applied statistics and will attend Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis to earn a Ph.D. in biostatistics.
            • Jessica Contreras (Eagle River, Alaska), graduated with a master’s degree in experimental psychology and will attend the University of Connecticut to earn a Ph.D. in developmental psychology.
            • Gloria Wink (Rochester, N.Y.) graduated with a master’s degree in environmental science and will attend University of Rochester Medical Center to earn a Ph.D. in epidemiology.

Other RIT/NTID graduates who are continuing on to earn advanced degrees:
            • Natalie Snyder (Rockville, Md.) graduated with a bachelor’s degree in biomedical science, with minors in exercise science and psychology, and will attend University of Maryland Eastern Shore to earn a Doctor of Physical Therapy degree.
            • Courtney Kellogg (Lake Waukomis, Mo.) graduated with a master’s degree in chemistry and will attend University of Rochester Medical Center to earn a Ph.D. in Pathways of Human Disease.
For more information about the Bridges to the Doctorate program, go to http://deafscientists.com/

RIT included in “Fiske Guide to Colleges 2017”

6 Jul

Aerial photo of RIT's sustainability building, four stories high with a red brick and glass exterior

Rochester Institute of Technology has again been named in the “Fiske Guide to Colleges,” one of only 26 private and 21 public universities included in the 2017 edition. The guide highlights RIT’s position as a leader in providing access services for deaf and hard-of-hearing students through its National Technical Institute for the Deaf and its focus on career-oriented and technology-based academics. More.

New scholarship benefits deaf, hard-of-hearing students at RIT/NTID

5 Jul

Mike Lawson in dark suit and tie standing with mom on left in yellow top and plaid skirt and dad on right in brown suit and tie.

RIT’s National Technical Institute for the Deaf has announced the Michael E. Lawson Endowed Scholarship, which will be implemented for the 2016-17 academic year. Lawson was a former RIT men’s soccer standout and assistant coach who was inducted into the RIT Athletics Hall of Fame in 2012.
 
The Lawson scholarship will support deaf and hard-of-hearing students in the College of Liberal Arts and in NTID’s Master of Science in Secondary Education program. At minimum, two awards will be made annually, one to a student in each the College of Liberal Arts and the MSSE program. The Lawson family generously gifted the funds to establish the scholarship.
 
“I am extremely proud to be part of establishing this scholarship for deserving young deaf and hard-of-hearing men and women,” said Lawson, who is a teacher of deaf and hard-of-hearing students at Neptune Middle School in Neptune, NJ. “I hope that the scholarship will provide an opportunity for them to have the same kinds of positive experiences that I had as a student at RIT/NTID.” 
 
Named the RIT Senior Male Athlete of the Year in 2006, Lawson enjoyed an excellent career with the Tigers, starting all 71 games 2002-05, posting 40 points from his midfield position on 13 goals and 14 assists. Eleven of his 13 career goals were game-winners, fourth all-time at the university.
 
Lawson was a four-time All-Empire 8 selection, earning Player of the Year honors in 2004 and 2005. He was also league Rookie of the Year in 2002. Lawson helped guide the Tigers to the 2004 Empire 8 Championship and a berth in the NCAA Tournament. He was also a 2004 National Soccer Coaches Association of America Adidas First Team All-Region selection.
 
“The importance of scholarship support for deserving deaf and hard-of-hearing students at RIT/NTID cannot be overstated,” said Gerard Buckley, NTID president and RIT vice president and dean. “We are so grateful to the Lawson family for their generous gift in honor of their son, Michael, who continues to serve as a role model to our deaf and hard-of-hearing student-athletes.”
 
A three-year team captain, Lawson was a two-time NSCAA Scholar All-American in 2004 and 2005. As an undergraduate, Lawson, an NTID student, maintained a 3.64 grade point average as a social work major. In his graduate studies, he had a 3.90 GPA in deaf education.
 
Lawson served as an assistant coach for the RIT men’s soccer program under head coach Bill Garno 2006-08.
 
Please contact Bryan Hensel, NTID Development at Bryan.Hensel@rit.edu for information on how you can make a gift to the fund.

RIT team wins first place in global challenge against terrorism

29 Jun

Female RIT student holding framed award certificate surrounded by her teammates, also women, all wearing black and white suits.

“It’s Time: ExOut Extremism,” a social media campaign created by Rochester Institute of Technology students, took top prize in a global challenge conducted by the U.S. State Department aimed at finding ways to counter terrorist propaganda online.

The RIT team was the only group from the United States to reach the finals of the P2P: Challenging Extremism competition held on June 27, 2016, and became the first U.S. team to win first place, defeating this year’s other finalist teams from Versalius College in Brussels and Khazar University in Baku, Azerbaijan. To reach the finals, RIT competed against 56 university teams from around the globe. More.

RIT students win award from Apple for game app

23 Jun

RIT students wearing blue t-shirts standing from left to right are Josh Deichmann, Erik Lydick and Patrick Pistor.

A game developed by three Rochester Institute of Technology students has been named one of the most well-designed apps of 2016, according to Apple.

The game app, called Dividr, took home an Apple Design Award on June 13 at the tech giant’s Worldwide Developer Conference in San Francisco. Apple gives out 12 Apple Design Awards each year—10 to professionally developed apps and two to student apps. The annual awards are meant to recognize independently developed apps that raise the bar in design, technology and innovation. More.