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NTID Students Construct 3D Printers ‘From the Ground Up’

29 Apr

Boxfuls of nuts, bolts and wires provided the inspiration for an Imagine RIT exhibit created by a class of NTID students. “Making 3D Printers to Learn New Technology” will be featured at the May 2 festival to show visitors how 3D printers are built from scratch using logic, programming knowledge, troubleshooting skills—and plenty of patience.

The students, who are enrolled in an elective course in the information and computing studies program, will also produce small souvenirs for visitors using the four printers they’ve built from the ground up.

“The printers don’t come with instructions, so this project is purely research based,” said Matthew Ward, a Center for Multidisciplinary Studies student from Newark, Del. “We’re working with very complicated wiring—always plugging and unplugging. We have researched which software programs are the best for print running and we work on programming the code. When an error message comes up, we fix it. It’s all about experimentation, troubleshooting. Sometimes, it’s frustrating, but moving past that is all part of the process.”

Tom Simpson, a faculty member in the information and computing studies program, believes the project has inspired them to believe that they can do anything. “As the students built the printers, they learned about science, technology, engineering, art and mathematics,” he said. “This project required lots of concentration and patience on their part. They’re excited to talk with the visitors about the whole process.”

Lance Ward, an applied computer technology major from Monroe, N.H., is looking forward to using what he’s learned in a future career. “This experience has been just as valuable as co-op or internship. For the past 11 weeks have really been immersed in writing code, upgrading programs. Actually seeing the results and being able to show them to the Imagine RIT visitors will make it all worthwhile.”

RIT/NTID Student Wins Fulbright Scholarship

29 Apr

History Estill-Varner, an ASL-English Interpreting and Global Studies undergraduate double major from Independence, Missouri, is the proud winner of a Fulbright Scholarship for the 2015-2016 academic year.

Since it was established in 1946, the Fulbright Scholar Program has administered highly competitive grants to foster international exchanges in education.

Estill-Varner will travel to the Dominican Republic to collaborate with the country’s National Association of the Deaf and the National Interpreting Association to build a sustainable Interpreter Training Program and assessment model to ensure that interpreters of Dominican Sign Language, LESDOM, are consistent and proficient, thus ensuring quality support services for deaf Dominicans.

The Fulbright U.S. Student Program is the largest exchange program in the country and provides funds for American students to live in another country for one year to teach English, conduct research or earn a graduate degree. Similarly, 40 international students from 25 countries attended RIT this year through the Fulbright Foreign Student Program.

Co-op Provides Biomedical Engineering Student With Valuable Work Experience

4 Mar

Photo by: Mark Mulville, Buffalo News

Photo by: Mark Mulville, Buffalo News

Lauren Samar, a third-year RIT/NTID student majoring in Biomedical Engineering, is featured in The Buffalo News for her development of a tool for surgery on cancer patients. During her co-op at Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Samar took her idea and developed it into a full concept, and now officals at Roswell Park Cancer Institute have applied for a provisional patent on the idea. More.

Snyder Breaks RIT Diving Record

24 Feb

RIT/NTID student Natalie Snyder placed second in the 11-dive championship round at the 2015 Upper New York State Collegiate Swimming Association Championships held Febuary 19-21 at the Webster Aquatic Center, Webster, N.Y. She also broke RIT's record in the 1-meter six-dive session. Snyder is a Biomedical Sciences major from Rockville, Md. More.

RIT/NTID Student Changes Statewide Testing, Earns National Girl Scout Award

16 Oct

A second-year RIT/NTID student is receiving national recognition this week as one of 10 Girl Scout USA 2014 Young Women of Distinction at a national convention in Salt Lake City.

Anna Krauss of Manorville, N.Y., has been a Girl Scout since age 5, when she joined as a Daisy Scout. Now that she is in college, she’s an Ambassador Scout and majoring in biotechnology and molecular bioscience. She regularly makes the Dean’s List at RIT.

Born deaf in one ear, Krauss lost her hearing in her other ear at age 9. Since then, she has relied on a sign language interpreter in her school classes.

In 2011, two years before she’d graduate from high school, Krauss was taking state-required tests. A portion of the test was a listening passage, given orally. Being profoundly deaf, Krauss had to rely on her interpreter to help her understand what the teacher was saying.

“I always dreaded the state tests for their listening portions,” she said. “Sometimes things get lost in translation,” Krauss said. She ended up with a test score of 80. “I started to cry if I got below a 90 in school,” she said. “It was ridiculous.”

For her Gold Award project, similar to the projects Boy Scouts must complete to become Eagle Scouts, Krauss decided to try to change the way those mandated listening portions of state tests are given to deaf and hard-of-hearing students in New York.

“I picked that because I felt very strongly about it,” she said. Krauss started lobbying state officials and as a result, the state now allows deaf and hard-of-hearing students across the state to use a written transcript during oral portions of examinations.

“It took three years for me to fight for that accommodation,” she said.

She doesn’t plan to attend the Girl Scout Convention in Salt Lake City because she doesn’t want to miss any classes. This summer, she traveled to the Girl Scouts of USA headquarters in New York City and met Anna Maria Chavez, the CEO of the Girls Scouts of the USA. Chavez presented Krauss with a $5,000 check that came with her award, which Krauss will use for college.

After college, she’s considering becoming a researcher or a science teacher, perhaps at RIT’s National Technical Institute for the Deaf.

But Krauss hopes to stay connected with the Girl Scouts as an alumnus so they can continue to empower girls like her. “I do want to continue in some way, to talk with younger troops to tell them how much they can do by staying with Girl Scouts and going all the way,” Krauss said. “It starts with cookie sales and ends with changing the world.”