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RIT baseball wins first Liberty League title

15 May

Baseball team members in uniform pose with Liberty League banner.

The RIT baseball team (33-7) won its first Liberty League Championship, defeating Clarkson University (18-18) 9-4 at Tiger Stadium on May 12. RIT earns an automatic berth into the 2017 NCAA Division III Baseball Championship, its first in the program’s 65-year history. More.

Young artists, writers win RIT/NTID’s digital arts, writing competitions

9 May

Artists image of a galloping horse in shades of browns, grays and whites

Rochester Institute of Technology’s National Technical Institute for the Deaf has announced the winners of the annual Digital Arts, Film and Animation Competition for Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing Students. The contest, in its 11th year, generated dozens of entries in graphic media, photo illustration and 3D animation.

The winners of each category, receiving a $250 prize, are:

  • Graphic Media: Gabriel Veit of Austin, Texas, a student at Texas School for the Deaf, for The Wind.
  • Photo Illustration: Zee Grant of Denver, Colo., a student at Rocky Mountain Deaf School, for Snow Life.
  • 3D Animation: Connor Switenky of Frederick, Md., a student at Maryland School for the Deaf, for Phantasma.

The runners-up were:

  • Graphic Media: Jeni Kim of Charleston, S.C., a student at Charleston County School of the Arts, for Color of Silence.
  • Photo Illustration: Samantha Suarez of Jacksonville, Fla., a student at Florida School for the Deaf and Blind, for No Matter What’s Inside, and Nydia Cooper of St. James, La., a student at Ascension Catholic High School, for The River Meets Bayou.

Honorable mentions were:

  • Interactive Media: Denali Thorn of Indianapolis, a student at Indiana School for the Deaf, for UFO Kid.
  • Graphic Media: Grace Kominsky of Mount Wolf, Pa., a student at Northeastern Senior High School, for Instrumental Elephantal Semblance.

The winning entries may be seen at www.rit.edu/ntid/dafac/winners.

High school students in 10th or 11th grades won prizes for the RIT/NTID SpiRIT Writing Contest for Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing Students. Winners have their choice of a scholarship and travel expenses to NTID’s Explore Your Future program, or a $500 cash prize.

Winners of the SpiRIT Writing Contest were Cecilia Gallagher of Bunker Hill, W.V., a student at Musselman High School, for Memories of the Fallen; and Hannah Van Sant of Sully, Iowa, a student at Pella Christian High School, for An Article Gone Awry. Honorable mentions were presented to Anna Kasper of St. Louis Park, Minn., a student at St. Louis Park High School, for Siddhartha’s Detachment; and Lillie Brown of Jacksonville, Ill., a student at Illinois School for the Deaf, for Sixteen is Way Too Young. Says Who?!

RIT business programs noted for excellence

9 May

Students with orange backpacks stand in front of brick building with metal awning and flanked with a wooden bench and plantings.

Rochester Institute of Technology’s graduate business programs continue to be noted for academic excellence globally among colleges and universities.

Eduniversal Masters Rankings 2017 cited six graduate business degree programs at RIT’s Saunders College of Business. The survey ranked the top universities within nine geographical zones. More.

 

Animation Career Review has named RIT the top game design school on the East Coast

5 May

Two people working on computer screens with animation on the screens and keyboards in front of them.

Animation Career Review has named Rochester Institute of Technology the top game design school on the East Coast. RIT also ranked third on the list of Top 50 Game Design Schools in the U.S.

The 2017 rankings were created by Animation Career Review, an online resource for aspiring animation, game design and development, graphic design and digital art professionals. The annual list also named RIT the top game design school in New York state and second best private school nationally.

“It’s great to be recognized for the hard work we put into our outstanding programs in games,” said David Schwartz, director of RIT’s School of Interactive Games and Media (IGM). “RIT stands out as a game design school because we provide opportunities for students and faculty to collaborate with others across the university—including RIT’s College of Imaging Arts and Sciences—and professionals in the industry.”

Animation Career Review noted that RIT offers several programs for aspiring game designers, including two bachelor’s degrees and one master’s. In fact, any student studying computing in RIT’s B. Thomas Golisano College of Computing and Information Sciences has the opportunity to minor in game design and development.

RIT’s Bachelor of Science in game design and development provides a broad-based undergraduate education in computing while exposing students to the breadth of game design and development processes. The bachelor’s program in new media interactive development also explores casual games, in addition to new technologies and experiences with web, wearable and mobile computing.

Students who pursue a master’s degree in game design and development at RIT focus on the technical roots in the computing and information sciences disciplines, while simultaneously covering the breadth of the development landscape through involvement in topics, including computer graphics, game engines, interactive narrative and game world design. The degree culminates with a capstone project in which students create their own games.

RIT game design students can also work with RIT’s MAGIC Center, a nonprofit university-wide research and development laboratory and a for-profit production studio that assists in efforts to bring digital media creations up to marketplace standards and commercialization. RIT’s MAGIC Spell Studios, which officially launched in November and will move into a new building in 2018, focuses on nurturing and growing new companies and publishing and distributing their projects.

The ranking also highlights RIT’s emphasis on cooperative education—full-time paid work experiences that provide students with an opportunity to learn on the job in real-world industry settings. With help from the co-op program, graduates of RIT’s game design and development programs go on to work at companies including Microsoft, Rockstar Games, Sony Interactive Entertainment, Valve Corp. and Walt Disney Interactive.

For the full game design school rankings, go to animationcareerreview.com/articles/2017-game-design-school-rankings.

RIT featured among “Colleges that Create Futures”

5 May

The words The Princeton Review shown in black letters with a red arrow swirling updards along the left hand side of the words

RIT is featured in the 2017 edition of The Princeton Review’s “Colleges That Create Futures: 50 Schools That Launch Careers by Going Beyond the Classroom.” Out of nearly 1,000 colleges that The Princeton Review considered for this book, the 50 schools that made the cut comprise only about 2 percent of the nation’s approximately 3,000 four-year colleges. More.