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Meet RIT/NTID student-athlete Otto Kingstedt

15 Dec

Meet RIT/NTID student-athlete Otto Kingstedt, a member of the RIT men’s track and field team. Otto is a graphic design major from Stockholm, Sweden.

Alumnus gives RIT $50 million to foster entrepreneurship and cybersecurity

13 Dec

Left to right: RIT President Munson, Austin McChord and President Emeritus Destler.

A 2009 alumnus has given Rochester Institute of Technology $50 million, the largest donation ever made to the university and one of the largest ever in the region.

The unprecedented gift comes from Austin McChord, founder and CEO of Datto, a Connecticut-based data protection company with engineering and support offices in downtown Rochester.

“A gift of this magnitude will help propel RIT from excellence to preeminence,” said RIT President David Munson. “We are so proud of our alumnus Austin McChord. He was passionate about his idea and he turned it into a big success. This embodies the creative element that we want to further highlight at RIT. Every student can be involved in creating things that never before existed, and then putting the result into play. His investment in RIT will help our students and faculty make their mark on the world.”

McChord, an RIT trustee, said he was inspired to make the donation by former RIT President Bill Destler, with whom he has developed a friendship.

“My goal with this gift is two-fold,” said McChord. “First is to help make more resources available to students, alumni and the community at-large to create, build and innovate for the future. But it’s also to help recognize those who helped you along the way. My success today would not have been possible without my time at RIT.”

Destler, who retired as RIT president in June 2017, was in the audience at RIT’s Student Innovation Hall as McChord announced his gift.

“I am thrilled that Austin McChord has chosen to share his success with RIT in the form of this most generous gift,” said Destler. “It’s truly been a pleasure to get to know him and to watch his business grow internationally as well as right here in Rochester, and I’m excited to see what the future holds for him as well as for the programs and projects this gift will support.”

The gift is to be designated for use in two major areas:

  • $30 million to foster creativity and entrepreneurship at RIT, including $17.5 million to launch the Maker Library & Innovative Learning Complex of the Future. This will be a new facility connecting RIT’s Wallace Center and the Student Alumni Union. Additional funding will go toward purchasing equipment and endowing faculty positions and student scholarships, including new “Entrepreneurial Gap Year” fellowships to help students advance their concepts into businesses.
  • $20 million to advance RIT’s cybersecurity and artificial intelligence capabilities. This funding will be used to expand facilities, as well as to establish endowments to attract and retain exceptional faculty and graduate students, primarily in the B. Thomas Golisano College of Computing and Information Sciences, the largest of RIT’s nine colleges.

“On behalf of the Board of Trustees, we extend our sincere appreciation to fellow Trustee Austin McChord for this magnanimous gift,” said RIT Trustees Chair Christine Whitman. “This most generous gift will allow RIT to expand and enhance its programming in some areas that the university is noted for, as well as further fostering our environment of creativity and innovation.”

McChord has been an active alumnus of RIT, serving as a frequent keynote speaker at events, including Venture Creations graduation, the annual Entrepreneurship Conference and the 2017 Commencement. Datto sponsored events such as RIT48, an entrepreneurship competition, and hackathons, and McChord has given of his time as a mentor in RIT’s SummerStart program, an intense summer program aimed at assisting entrepreneurs/innovators in developing their business concepts to a point where they are ready to begin to seek angel investment.

McChord founded Datto, a global provider of Total Data Protection Solutions, in 2007. Starting with an idea he had while a student at RIT, McChord started the company in the basement of his father’s office building. His original goal of building basic back-up for small businesses across the country has expanded dramatically over the past 10 years. Datto has experienced exponential growth, appearing on the coveted Inc. 500 list of fastest growing private companies in 2012, 2013 and 2014, and has been recognized by the Connecticut Technology Council as one of the state’s fastest growing companies. The company has also received numerous industry awards for company growth, product excellence and customer support.

Datto was recently acquired by Vista Equity Partners and merged with Autotask Corp. McChord is CEO of the new company, which has about 1,400 employees with offices in nine countries. In 2015, the company became Connecticut’s most valuable start-up, with a valuation in excess of $1 billion.

In August 2014, Datto opened a branch in downtown Rochester on the fourth floor of RIT’s Downtown Center, at 40 Franklin St., becoming the first company in the region to join that state’s START-UP NY program. Initial plans called for Datto to add 70 workers within the next 18 months, but Datto has already grown to more than 200 employees in Rochester. McChord has said he expects the company’s Rochester operations, which also has offices on multiple floors of The Metropolitan (former Chase Tower), to continue to grow.

McChord’s business success has earned him several honors. The holder of several patents, McChord was named to the Forbes 30 Under 30 list in 2015 as a leader in Enterprise Technology and won the Ernst & Young Entrepreneur of the Year New York Region Award in 2016.

RIT named one of the Top 200 Colleges for Native Americans by ‘Winds of Change’ magazine

11 Dec

Native American woman with long dark hair wearing a white cardigan hands a student a craft item.

“Winds of Change” magazine recognized Rochester Institute of Technology as one of the Top 200 Colleges for Native American Students. This marks the eighth time RIT made the annual list, published by American Indian Science and Engineering Society. The magazine ranked top universities in the United States “where American Indians are going to school in significant numbers and where the community, Native programs and support are strong enough for these students to enjoy college and stay on to graduate.” There are 180 Native American students pursuing their degrees at RIT, including 12 who are deaf or hard of hearing. More.

RIT’s College of Science, NTID develop new articulation agreement

5 Dec

Light skinned man wearing white lab coat, safety goggles and blue gloves works with science lab equipment.

Qualified deaf and hard-of-hearing students at Rochester Institute of Technology’s National Technical Institute for the Deaf now have additional opportunities to continue their studies toward bachelor’s degrees in the sciences at RIT.

 

Thanks to an articulation agreement between NTID’s Department of Science and Mathematics and RIT’s College of Science Thomas H. Gosnell School of Life Sciences, qualified deaf and hard-of-hearing students completing the associate of applied science (AAS) degree in Laboratory Science Technology can seamlessly transfer into bachelor’s degree programs in Biology, Environmental Science and Biotechnology & Molecular Bioscience. A majority of the credit earned toward the LST degree will apply to the bachelor’s degrees in these majors.

The Laboratory Science Technology major, with its foundation of course sequences in chemistry, biology and instrumental analysis, was developed primarily from an industry perspective to prepare students for employment as laboratory technicians. The major has several significant factors that set it apart, including the application of real-world analyses and state-of-the-art classrooms and instrumentation laboratories. Graduates are prepared to work in a broad range of fields, including chemical, biological, biotechnical, pharmaceutical, environmental, industrial, forensic and food analysis.

Students earning an associate degree have the option of finding employment or continuing to work toward a baccalaureate degree.

“NTID is committed to increasing the number of deaf scientists in our country, and has programs that encourage students from middle and high school through post doctorate programs” says Gerry Buckley, NTID president and RIT vice president and dean. “This articulation agreement is designed to encourage academic cooperation and the exchange of information between NTID and the College of Science, and will go a long way toward meeting our goal of adding deaf representation to science labs throughout the country.”

The LST program has an existing articulation agreement with the School of Chemistry and Materials Science in RIT’s College of Science where students can work towards a bachelor’s degree in chemistry or biochemistry. This new articulation agreement expands the options within the College of Science.

Student spotlight on Louis Albano

2 Dec

Male with short dark hair shown with and without makeup.

Louis Albano is a fourth-year marketing major from Carmel, New York, but on Instagram and in the online beauty community, Albano goes by the persona of Louis Jenson. Through Instagram, Facebook Live and YouTube, Albano shares his creativity by making videos and posting photos of his different makeup looks. Using makeup is a fun and creative outlet for him, but Albano is also passionate about making the beauty community and industry more accessible for all people, particularly the deaf community. He says that his goal isn’t to gain internet fame, he simply wants to raise awareness of different accessibility issues and help provide the proper resources to those who may need them.

Albano is going to be featured in a Yahoo Lifestyle video and article celebrating International Day of Persons with Disabilities, set to be released on December 3. More.