Formal & Poster Presentations

Instructional Technology

& Education of the Deaf

Supporting Learners, K — College

An International Symposium

 

 

National Technical Institute for the Deaf

Rochester, NY

June 25-29, 2001

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Abstracts of Formal and Poster Presentations

 

This collection of abstracts is for your convenience in selecting particular presentations to attend during this three-day Symposium. The abstracts for Formal and Poster presentations are presented in the order they appear in the program, by the date and time. With few exceptions, they appear as they were received by the program committee.

The following is an alphabetical list of first authors/presenters as they appear in the program, together with links (*) to their abstract as it appears in this collection.

Araki, Tsutomu    *
Berent, Gerald    *
Brody, Joyce    *
Cammeron, Julie    *
Carlson, Beth    *
Carter, Ken    *
Clymer, E. William    *
Cooper, Susan    *
Craig, Paul    *
Cutcliffe, Alan    *
Daniele, Vince    *   *
DeCaro, James    *
DeCaro, Patricia    *
DiGiovanni, Barbara    *
Edge, Robert    *
Elliot, Ph.D., Lisa    *
Elliott, Lori    *   *
Ellsworth, Mary    *
Fifield, Bryce    *
Finton, Ken    *
Freed, Geoff    *   *
Gottermeier, Linda    *
Johnson, Ed.D, Leilani    *
Johnson, Harold    *
Juhas, Sherri    *
Keefe, Barbara    *
Kelly, Ronald    *
King, Ph.D., Cynthia    *
Klein, Diane    *
Kowalski, Luanne    *
Kurlychek, Ken    *
Lang, Harry    *
Lauria, Dino    *
Loeterman, Mardi    *   *
Mackall, Phil    *
Mallory, James    *   *   *   *
Mineck, Edward    *
Moseley, Brad    *
Mumford, Bonnie    *
Nash, Kenneth    *   *
Newell, Ph.D., William    *
Paine, Robert    *
Perez, Dana    *
Pitt, Brent    *
Pongor, Kathy    *
Poor, Geoffrey    *
Popson, Shelley    *
Potanovic, George    *
Reeves, June    *
Rust, Mark    *   *
Seago, Howie    *
Siple, Ph.D., Linda    *
Smith, Duane    *
Sorkin, Donna    *
Stifter, Rosemary *   *
Strassman, Barbara    *
Terry, Janet    *
Thompson, Ph.D., John    *
Ting, Simon    *   *
Updegraff, Melanie    *
Wallber, Josara    *
Warren, Denise    *
Wilcox Hsu, Debra    *
Yeh-Kennedy, Mei    *
Young, Marsha    *


A Redesign of Deaf Education Teacher Preparation Through Technological Innovations and Collaborative Activities (M10B)

Johnson, Harold Email: hjohnson@kent.edu

Kent State University

Dilka, Karen - Eastern Kentucky University

Mertens, Donna - Gallaudet University

Monday, June 25, 2001 — 10:00 AM

Location: LBJ [060] 2590

Type: Formal Audience: All

Strand: Online and Distance Education

In June of 1999 the Association of College Educators - Deaf/Hard-of-Hearing was awarded a $2.1 million PT3 Catalyst grant. The basic design of that grant is one in which the nation's 72 Deaf Education Teacher Preparation Programs, in collaboration with all of the major Deaf Education organizations, have agreed: 1) to establish local, regional and national networks of college professors, their preservice teachers, the existing teachers who provide field placements, the parents of deaf/hard-of-hearing (d/hh) students and d/Deaf adults; 2) to use those networks to support and recognize "technology proficient" preservice teachers and their faculty as they bridge the college-K-12 "realities gap" and as they produce new learning resources that serve to enhance instruction and improve learning; and 3) to use the resulting collaborative network to restructure Deaf Education Teacher Preparation through the incorporation of technology proficiency standards and through the establishment of a sustainable network of colleagues that will enable all d/hh students to meet high academic standards. This presentation will share the organizational structure, technological innovations, evaluation design and emerging products that the grant effort has thus far generated.


PROJECT SOLVE: Web-based Guided Practice to Improve Math Word Problem Solving (M10C)

Kelly, Ronald Email: rrkncp@rit.edu

National Technical Institute for the Deaf

Lang, Harry G. — National Technical Institute for the Deaf

Mousley, Keith - National Technical Institute for the Deaf

Monday, June 25, 2001 — 10:00 AM

Location: LBJ [060] 3237

Type: Formal Audience: All

Strand: Using Technology to Support Learning

This innovative web-based problem-solving project is designed to help deaf high school and college students improve their word problem-solving skills through instruction and interactive guided practice with feedback. The practice environment with guided help is available 24 hours daily giving deaf students an accessible independent learning option. It provides practice with both problem solving exercises (a well-defined problem with one clearly correct answer) and true problem-solving situations (less well defined, requiring more effort to understand and accurately represent). The website also collects data on the students' problem-solving performance for evaluation purposes, thus offering the potential to develop a national database on deaf students for a wide range of problem-solving situations. The evaluation will include the students' problem-solving performance and learning progress, as well as the compilation of feedback on the perceived usefulness of these web-based problem solving learning activities from the collaborating teachers and participating students. The development and dissemination activities of this project are supported by a grant from the Fund for the Improvement of Postsecondary Education (FIPSE), US Department of Education.


The Design and Use of a Language Facility for the Instruction of Sign Language Interpreters (M10E)

Siple, Ph.D., Linda Email: LASNSS@rit.edu

National Technical Institute for the Deaf

Smith, Richard - National Technical Institute for the Deaf

Monday, June 25, 2001 — 10:00 AM

Location: LBJ [060] 3615

Type: Formal Audience: College

Strand: Using Technology to Support Learning

The task of sign language interpreting requires the interpreter to change a spoken English message into a signed message and a signed message into a spoken English message. When done well the interpreter's performance is deceptively effortless and uncomplicated. An interpreter's education includes achieving fluency in American Sign Language and English as well as mastery of several hundred sub-tasks. Given the audio and visual nature of the required tasks, the use of audio and video technology is central to the preparation of ASL-English interpreters.

A program designed to prepare ASL-English interpreters must have a language lab facility that is designed to simulate many different tasks. The minimal requirements for such a facility is to have each student's carrel equipped with a camera, videocassette playback/recorder, audiocassette playback/recorder, videotape monitor and headphones. In addition the equipment must be integrated in such a way as to maximize flexibility in function and ease of use for both students and instructors. At NTID we have successfully designed a language lab facility that provides a stimulating and creative environment for both students and instructors.

Some of the notable features include:

· Students can individually control a carrel or the instructor can control all of the carrels from the instructor's station.

· Students can watch a video tape of a deaf person signing and create another videotape of the deaf person signing with the student's voice interpretation recorded on the videotape.

· Students can listen to an audio taped lecture and create a video tape of their signed interpretation of the lecture.

· Instructors can simultaneously send the same stimulus material to 10 students.


Distance Learning Pilot: Physics and Mathematics (M10A)

Part I; Part II To Continue At 11:00

Distance Learning Team Email: vadntm@rit.edu

National Technical Institute for the Deaf

Rochester School for the Deaf

Daniele, Vince — RIT/NTID

Robinson, Vicki - RIT/NTID

Long, Gary - RIT/NTID

Aidala, Camille - RIT/NTID

Parrish, Rhonda - RSD

Conyer, Dave - NTID

Monday, June 25, 2001 — 10:00 AM

Location: LBJ [060] PANARA THEATRE

Type: Formal Audience: All

Strand: Using Technology to Support Learning

A panel presentation will report on the results of a collaborative distance-learning pilot between the Rochester School for the Deaf (RSD) and the National Technical Institute for the Deaf (NTID), focusing on Physics and Mathematics. Students participating in the pilot were high school seniors at advanced levels in RSD's curriculum, with participating teachers representing collaborative teams made up of RSD and NTID colleagues. Distance learning strategies represented an interweaving of videoconferencing, web-based support, locally installed simulation software, and on-site tutoring. Results and implications of the pilot will be presented and discussed in terms of pre/post-test results for students, qualitative assessment of participant experiences, the benefits and challenges of working collaboratively between two schools, and the costs, benefits, and drawbacks of applying these particular instructional technologies in support of deaf learners-from both technological and educational perspectives.

 


Popular Electronic Conferencing Use and Comparison (M11D)

Mallory, James Email: jrmnet@rit.edu

National Technical Institute for the Deaf

Rothman, Gail - National Technical Institute for the Deaf

Fassee, Richard - National Technical Institute for the Deaf

Monday, June 25, 2001 — 11:00 AM

Location: LBJ [060] 1510

Type: Formal Audience: All

Strand: Online and Distance Education

RIT's College of Applied Science and Technology (CAST) and the National Technical Institute for the Deaf (NTID) have been using interactive electronic conferencing software for many years with both deaf and hearing, on-campus and Distance Learning (DL) student populations. These two colleges have gained valuable experience with three electronic conferencing software products. These products include First Class™, Black Board™ and Prometheus™. This software was used within NTID's Applied Computer Technology department and CAST's Electrical/Telecommunications department in computer programming and Telecommunications courses. The wide variety of class demographics included all deaf, all hearing and deaf/hearing mainstreamed student audiences in both traditional and DL courses, with both traditional college students and adult learners. This paper will present the advantages of integrating electronic conferencing into the classroom in general, as well as reviewing the pros and cons of each of the above named products from a student perspective, a pedagogical perspective and from a user-friendly implementation perspective as an instructor. Our findings will be presented and then we will entertain an interactive discussion with the audience about our findings and experience. The audience will be invited to share their experiences related to this technology.


Gallaudet Online Learning Solutions: Portals, Course Tools, and Implementation (M11B)

King, Ph.D., Cynthia Email: cindy.king@gallaudet.edu

Gallaudet University

Monday, June 25, 2001 — 11:00 AM

Location: LBJ [060] 2590

Type: Formal Audience: All

Strand: Online and Distance Education

Gallaudet University was an early adopter of a formal online learning management system (LMS) in 1997. This presentation chronicles development over the past five years–including the evolution of our system, training for faculty, staff, and students, methods for exchanging information between our learning system and student information system (SIS), and plans for evolving our portal to connect the learning system, SIS, and other web resources. Gallaudet's online learning system is called GDOC (Gallaudet Dynamic Online Collaboration). A mini-portal is at http://courses.gallaudet.edu. There, students, faculty, and staff may login and get a personalized list of their online materials. The site also contains links to other campus resources. GDOC training is partially supported by a Mellon Foundation grant (http://learntech.gallaudet.edu/mellon). Instructional design support is provided by a team of faculty and staff. In Fall 2000, Gallaudet implemented a link between GDOC and the Peoplesoft Student Information System (SIS). This link automates the creation of course rosters and user profiles within the GDOC system. In the coming year, Gallaudet will evolve our online learning system to include new learning tools and an enhanced portal connecting our learning system, SIS, and traditional web resources. At the conference, we will describe goals and project plans.


Integrating Technology into Literacy: Digital Video Dictionary (M11C)

Stifter, Rosemary Email: rosemary.stifter@gallaudet.edu

Laurent Clerc National Deaf Education Center

Rangel, Francisca - Laurent Clerc National Deaf Education Center

Reed, Ruth - Laurent Clerc National Deaf Education Center

Monday, June 25, 2001 — 11:00 AM

Location: LBJ [060] 3237

Type: Formal Audience: K-12

Strand: Using Technology to Support Learning

Francisca Rangel, a 3-4-5 teacher/researcher at the Laurent Clerc National Deaf Education Center saw the need to teach her largely ESL class basic vocabulary words while improving reading and writing skills. After collaboration with the technology specialist and ASL specialist, the digital video dictionary project was born. The process in creating this dictionary is very structured but is not difficult and can be done with a few extra pieces of equipment. The class dictionary is created in PowerPoint and includes text, graphics and video clips. Each student participates in creating the dictionary on the computer using the SMART board. Since the project has begun the students are recognizing words they have learned from the class dictionary in their dialogue journals. This type of literacy project could not be possible without the use of technology. It is the technology that gets the students excited about the project and they don't realize how much they are learning. The presentation will emphasize how this project aids in making the connection between sign and print, decreasing the anxiety of reading and writing in the classroom, improving communication skills, and increasing student and teacher confidence in using technology.

 


Distance Learning Pilot: Physics and Mathematics (M11A)

Part II; A Continuation of Presentation M10A

Distance Learning Team Email: vadntm@rit.edu

National Technical Institute for the Deaf

Rochester School for the Deaf

Daniele, Vince - NTID

Carr, Joan - NTID

Spiecker, Patti - RSD

Long, Gary — NTID

Camille Aidala - NTID

Rhonda Parrish - RSD

Dave Conyer - NTID

Monday, June 25, 2001 — 11:00 AM

Location: LBJ [060] PANARA THEATRE

Type: Formal Audience: All

Strand: Using Technology to Support Learning

A panel presentation will report on the results of a collaborative distance-learning pilot between the Rochester School for the Deaf (RSD) and the National Technical Institute for the Deaf (NTID), focusing on Physics and Mathematics. Students participating in the pilot were high school seniors at advanced levels in RSD's curriculum, with participating teachers representing collaborative teams made up of RSD and NTID colleagues. Distance learning strategies represented an interweaving of videoconferencing, web-based support, locally installed simulation software, and on-site tutoring. Results and implications of the pilot will be presented and discussed in terms of pre/post-test results for students, qualitative assessment of participant experiences, the benefits and challenges of working collaboratively between two schools, and the costs, benefits, and drawbacks of applying these particular instructional technologies in support of deaf learners-from both technological and educational perspectives.

 


Exploring Career Opportunities Using Technology (M130D)

Kowalski, Luanne Email: luanne.kowalski@gallaudet.edu

Laurent Clerc National Deaf Education Center

Monday, June 25, 2001 — 1:30 PM

Location: LBJ [060] 1510

Type: Formal Audience: K-12

Strand: Transition to Workplace

Team 11 at the Clerc Center began exploring career opportunities in a new way - utilizing technology. Students were asked to select potential career interests, research those careers on the Internet, develop PowerPoint or Inspiration presentations, and share those presentations with their peers. This session will explain the process used, share Internet sites that were found and will show some examples of the presentations developed by students. Websites have been entered into a Web link resource library (http://academic.gallaudet.edu/PCNMPlibraries/TEAM11.nsf?opendatabase) to facilitate sharing among teachers and transition specialists around the nation. Sample student presentations will be shared.


Project Inclusion (M130B)

DeCaro, Patricia Email: padnod@rit.edu

National Technical Institute for the Deaf

Nash, Kenneth R. - National Technical Institute for the Deaf

Foster, Susan - National Technical Institute for the Deaf

Monday, June 25, 2001 — 1:30 PM

Location: LBJ [060] 2590

Type: Formal Audience: All

Strand: Using Technology to Support Learning

The ultimate objective of Project Inclusion is to assist people who are deaf to realize equality of opportunity in education and society. Project Inclusion will identify "universal" design principles, effective policies and practical programs related to the inclusion of deaf people within each partner country (Greece, Holland, Sweden and the USA). This information will be organized into the first-ever course on the subject of comparative deaf education. The course will be delivered by web technology, and complemented by an intensive Capping Experience offered on a rotating basis among the partner countries. Students will be future educators of the deaf.

Project Inclusion WWW Site: http://www.rit.edu/~624www/fipse/


Technology Used to Support Sign and Spoken Language Development (M130E)

Mumford, Bonnie Email: bsm5558@rit.edu

National Technical Institute for the Deaf

Sims, Donald G. Ph.D. - National Technical Institute for the Deaf

Newell, William J. Ph.D. - National Technical Institute for the Deaf

Monday, June 25, 2001 — 1:30 PM

Location: LBJ [060] 3205 [SIL]

Type: Formal Audience: All

Strand: Using Technology to Support Learning

The NTID Self-Instruction Lab was established to support signed and spoken language communication. The lab serves as an environment for both expressive and receptive practice of these activities within a self-instruction format.

For purposes of developing their sign and spoken language communication skills, learners have access to sixteen state-of-the-art instructional carrels. Learners can use instructional materials in videotape, videodisc, CD ROM and audio tape formats.

The presentation will show examples of the different technologies that can be used to support spoken and sign language practice. The following technology will be demonstrated:

· Basic Sign Language videotape for sign language practice

· DAVID videodisc to support speechreading practice

· Optical Finishing CD for spoken and sign language practice

· ASL Dictionary and Inflection Guide on CD ROM for sign language practice

· Flex cam for expressive practice utilizing videotape and CD ROM technology

Handouts will include a description of the equipment in one of the new carrels in the lab as well as a listing of the materials available to support sign language practice.


A Study of Current Models of Online Learning for Deaf Learners (M130C)

Yeh-Kennedy, Mei Email: mei@eyestudios.com

Gallaudet University

Monday, June 25, 2001 — 1:30 PM

Location: LBJ [060] 3237

Type: Formal Audience: All

Strand: Online and Distance Education

The proposed paper will compare current models of online learning within three years for Deaf learners of any age. The focus of the paper is to report on survey-based data gathered from current online learning projects including the purpose they serve. The study will also address whether there are interface design issues creating a unique need to the design for Deaf learners.

Those are the questions that the paper will address. What are the benefits and challenges of online learning for the community? What techniques are being used to better accommodate Deaf learners? Will the universal design (www.cast.org) be effective and/or sufficient for Deaf learners online?

The significant of this study is to produce a better understanding among designers and educators of the effect of design on Deaf learners. I am currently experiencing online learning firsthand and being a deaf individual I am intrigued by the opportunity to enhance online learning for Deaf learners.


Online Learning: A Learning Medium for Everyone (M130A)

Thompson, Ph.D., John Email: thompsjt@bscmail.buffalostate.edu

Buffalo State College

Monday, June 25, 2001 — 1:30 PM

Location: LBJ [060] PANARA THEATRE

Type: Formal Audience: All

Strand: Online and Distance Education

Online learning, or distance learning using the Internet, provides a medium that allows deaf and hard of hearing students in K-12 and higher education an equal footing in their classes without an interpreter "in the middle of the communication." With the text-based medium of such online platforms as Blackboard.com, deaf and hard of hearing students can compete strictly on their own.

Using a PowerPoint presentation, the presenter will discuss his online teaching experiences using Blackboard.com and the Internet to web-enhance traditional face-to-face (f2f) courses. The presenter also will offer his thoughts on his experience teaching classes totally relying on online instruction over the Internet in place of f2f classes.

Using the Internet and Internet-based instructional platforms such as Blackboard.com, classes can be taught without using paper or verbal communication. Instructors can post announcements, assignments, course documents (such as PowerPoint presentations) and grades for asynchronous access and use by their students. Both real-time discussions (using virtual chat) and asynchronous discussions (using discussion board forums) within Blackboard can play an extended role in the class. Assigning readings can be assigned from selected Internet sites or using other Internet-based measures as XanEdu's electronic CoursePacks. Students can submit their work through the written communication, using e-mail and bulletin board-like discussion board forums in Blackboard.

With the addition of online learning, K-12 and higher education classrooms morph into interactive experiences in which deaf and hard of hearing learners become "24-7" learners.

 


Cornerstones Approach to Literacy Development (M230D)

Loeterman, Mardi Email: mardi_loeterman@wgbh.org

CPB/WGBH National Center for Accessible Media

Paul, Peter Ph.D. - Ohio State University, College of Ed.

Monday, June 25, 2001 — 2:30 PM

Location: LBJ [060] 1510

Type: Formal Audience: K-12

Strand: Using Technology to Support Learning

The presenters will discuss an approach to literacy development that aims to improve reading and writing skills of deaf and hard-of-hearing children in the early elementary grades. Children must learn to identify a large number of words in print, develop in-depth knowledge about the words, and develop adequate background knowledge in order to comprehend a story in print. Each literacy unit has a story on video (produced for a general audience), and offers a wide variety of materials, both high- and low-tech, to keep children engaged and motivated to work intensively on the story for nearly two weeks. Additional materials include versions of the story in American Sign Language and manual forms of English, a hypertext version of the story, activities related to the story, clip art and other materials for word study, and computer games. Teachers receive a teachers guide which highlights instructional practices that can maximize the use of the materials toward a rigorous set of literacy objectives. We field-tested one unit in six classrooms and gathered evidence on effectiveness in improving literacy and feasibility in the classroom. Children learned a significant number of new words and gained word knowledge. The presenters will describe the literacy approach, demonstrate materials, and discuss implications for literacy instruction with deaf children.


IdeaTools: Rapid Development Tools for Creating Interactive Multimedia - Enabled Courses on the Web (M230B)

Ting, Simon Email: sktnmp@rit.edu

National Technical Institute for the Deaf

Pitoniak, Jason - National Technical Institute for the Deaf

Clarke, Cathy - National Technical Institute for the Deaf

Monday, June 25, 2001 — 2:30 PM

Location: LBJ [060] 2590

Type: Formal Audience: All

Strand: Online and Distance Education

The presenters will outline a methodology for developing interactive Web sites to deliver instruction to learners over the Web. They will describe IdeaTools, a Web-based instructional development application that they created to help non-technically inclined faculty and instructional developers to create their own interactive Web sites for instructional purposes. They will discuss their experiences in using IdeaTools to create Web sites that incorporates course readings, handouts, online quizzes, electronic homework assignments and labs, as well as group e-mail, online class forums and chat rooms to support classroom teaching and Web-based distance learning in a wide range of content areas, such as reading and writing, social studies, meteorology, astronomy, environmental studies, chemistry and biochemistry, Web design, and computer programming. They will discuss how instructors can take advantage of existing materials, in the form of Word documents, PDF files, PowerPoint presentations, graphics, Web animations, and videos, to cut down development time. The presenters will outline their plans to disseminate IdeaTools for general use. They will demonstrate the IdeaTools tutorial Web site where interested beta users can sign up for free accounts and receive online instruction so that they can learn to utilize IdeaTools to create their own Web-based classroom and Web-based distance learning solutions.


Using C-Print to Support Learning in Secondary and Postsecondary Settings (M230C)

Elliot, Ph.D., Lisa Email: lbenrd@rit.edu

National Technical Institute for the Deaf

Stinson, Michael - National Technical Institute for the Deaf

McKee, Barbara - National Technical Institute for the Deaf

Francis, Pam - National Technical Institute for the Deaf

Monday, June 25, 2001 — 2:30 PM

Location: LBJ [060] 3237

Type: Formal Audience: All

Strand: Using Technology to Support Learning

C-Print is a real-time speech-to-text transcription system that was developed to meet the information access needs of students in mainstream classes while addressing constraints such as cost and availability of support services. Mainstreamed students often have diverse communication needs and may have difficulty fully comprehending information in class. Traditional support services of interpreting and note-taking serve many students adequately. However, alternative forms of support may provide the best access to communication for other students.

C-Print's development resulted from years of research to create a new real-time speech-to-text system. It is a system which addresses the need for real-time and notetaking supports with more complete information than can usually be provided by a student notetaker while providing such information in a cost efficient way. At present, over 250 people have been trained as C-Print captionists throughout the United States and the system is currently used as a support service in high schools and colleges across the nation. The proposed presentation will address the following topics related to C-Print: The development and evaluation of the C-Print system. Ways in which C-Print supports individual learners within the mainstream classroom setting. How schools across the country are implementing the C-Print's system.


Adequate Testing and Evaluation of On-Line Learners (M230A)

Mallory, James Email: jrmnet@rit.edu

National Technical Institute for the Deaf

Monday, June 25, 2001 — 2:30 PM

Location: LBJ [060] PANARA THEATRE

Type: Formal Audience: All

Strand: Online and Distance Education

One logistical and pedagogical challenge with on-line or remote teaching is evaluating the learner's knowledge in a fair, secure and efficient manner. At NTID, we have been teaching Distance Learning courses to deaf and hearing students for the past six years and have implemented means for remotely evaluating students in C++ and Visual Basic computer programming classes. The three methods used were remote proctoring, on-line testing with multiple choice and fill in questions, and downloading and uploading answers using electronic conferencing software. When implementing a testing method, security, ease and timeliness for data collection, ease of use by the students, turn-around time, feedback to the students, flexibility of how the testing is done, and administration/implementation are but a few of the issues to consider. Each method has its strengths and weaknesses in these different areas. In this session we will present the findings of the three different testing methods as well as the advantages and disadvantages of each from an administrative, teacher and student perspective. This presentation will end with an interactive discussion with the audience regarding which testing systems are best for which content areas and learners.


Innovative Technologies Applied in an Integrated-Curriculum Unit (M330D)

Popson, Shelley Email: Popson_s@popmail.firn.edu

Resource Materials & Technology Center: Deaf/Hard of Hearing

Ezzell, Kay - Resource Materials & Technology Center: Deaf/Hard of Hearing

Monday, June 25, 2001 — 3:30 PM

Location: LBJ [060] 1510

Type: Formal Audience: All

Strand: Using Technology to Support Learning

Technology is interwoven into our daily lives providing access to information and other people. Technology benefits us with an increased level of independence through use of email and automated, text-based applications. Students must be technology literate, information literate, and English literate to be successful in this "Digital Age." Innovative technologies can be used to provide access to digital information and to increase student motivation and achievement. This presentation will demonstrate a cross-curricular unit that integrates innovative technologies and the Internet. Resources and explanations will be provided related to "Information Literacy" and integrating technology into methods of learning. The use of technology tools as learning tools will be demonstrated: Internet to present and gather information; Inspiration and/or Kidspiration to manipulate and organize information; PowerPoint, HyperStudio, and/or AppleWorks to author and present; and SigningAvatar and SEE Interactive to support and assist in language development. This approach was successfully implemented in a Technology Literacy Challenge Grant involving classrooms with deaf/hard-of-hearing students throughout the state of Florida. Participants will leave with knowledge about and resources (including demonstration CD-ROMs and tutorials) for some of the most effective and innovative technologies. Participants will also receive a rubric for multimedia projects and an example Teacher Technology IEP.


Web-based Curriculum Development for the Social Sciences (M330B)

Cammeron, Julie Email: jjcnla@rit.edu

National Technical Institute for the Deaf

Ting, Simon - National Technical Institute for the Deaf

Monday, June 25, 2001 — 3:30 PM

Location: LBJ [060] 2590

Type: Formal Audience: All

Strand: Online and Distance Education

This presentation will focus on technological tools that enable faculty to more efficiently and effectively teach and work with students. In particular, this presentation will describe the advantages and disadvantages of Web-based curricula and special features of Web-based teaching that make the teaching/learning process more enjoyable and productive for both faculty and students. Advantages of Web teaching include material availability, electronic announcements, the ability to edit and update materials on a regular basis, and the provision of academic links for enrichment. Other features that are extremely important are an electronic homework system, an on-line grade database and a tailor-made pop-up glossary that is available for use in each course. Disadvantages of Web teaching include the substantial time and effort required to put course materials on line, the need for highly skilled technical support people and the necessity for students to have access to a computer. The presenters will describe how they save development time by using IdeaTools, a combined authoring/course management system at RIT/NTID that non-technically inclined faculty can take advantage of to create their own interactive Web sites for instructional purposes. The process used in the development of new courses and the type of materials available from faculty at other institutions will also be discussed.


Shared Texts, Negotiated Meanings: Perspectives on the Computer Mediated Communication of Postsecondary Students Who are Deaf (M330C)

Carlson, Beth Email: carlsonbeth@spjc.edu

Saint Petersburg Junior College

Monday, June 25, 2001 — 3:30 PM

Location: LBJ [060] 3237

Type: Formal Audience: College

Strand: Strategies for Assessing the Impact of Technology in Teaching/Learning Process

Because the last thirty years have brought about dramatic changes in the ways that languages are taught, providing comprehensible input is now a pedagogical imperative. Computer mediated communication and the use of the Internet to deliver instruction is quickly becoming the norm rather than the exception. This new literacy which is situated on the on the computer network, challenges students to use language in new ways. Traditional forums where classrooms consist of group-centered discussion, lectures, teacher-student conferences, and written assignments, are giving way to interaction patterns that disrupt the teacher-centered authority and reflect a polar shift from structural to communicative practices.

In computer-mediated communication, importing shared knowledge and scaffolding in the process of dialogic participation contributes to meaningful problem solving tasks in language. From a modeling view, interaction provides an opportunity for students to observe and take as their own, language, skills, and behaviors of teachers or more experienced peers. This is a particularly compelling aspect of networked based language for deaf students in the process of acquiring English. In the case of synchronous and asynchronous interaction tools, the concern is to evaluate whether and how this communication context affects the process of acquiring a second language and to determine the linguistic relevance of such communication. This presentation will focus on the theoretical aspects of second language acquisition in networked based language environments and apply these concepts to practice in English language classrooms with students who are deaf.


Integrating Your Social Studies Lesson Plans Using Technology in the Classroom (M330A)

DiGiovanni, Barbara Email: Boingo111@aol.com

Rochester School for the Deaf

DiVincenzo, Gene - Rochester School for the Deaf

Monday, June 25, 2001 — 3:30 PM

Location: LBJ [060] PANARA THEATRE

Type: Formal Audience: K-12

Strand: Using Technology to Support Learning

Various web sites with useful background information that relate to Social Studies abound in the World Wide Web. A sub goal of this topic is to develop lesson plans that allow Deaf students working independently or cooperative settings use of technical information tools. Tips on the development of teacher-made student activity sheets that the samples will be shared in the presentation. An additional goal is to have Deaf students examine primary sources using web sites, digital movie and CD-ROMs; to see history not just as names, dates, and events to be memorized, but as a fascinating web of connections. The students will take on the role of historians as they examine primary sources directly through a process of inquiry, observation, analysis, and synthesis. The presenters will discuss sets of practical tools for making the most of the Web in an educational environment. A common fear shared among the teachers for the deaf about incorporating of such technology in the classroom today is the limited amount of time available to make such applications. Ideas will be provided on how to give teachers as well as students a quick and easy access for each activity to the Web so as not to detract from valuable instructional time.


Learning Geography via Virtual Travel (M14P)

Brody, Joyce Email: jbrody@mail.sandi.net

Madison High School

Monday, June 25, 2001 — 4:30 PM

Location: LBJ [060] LBJ STREET

Type: Poster Audience: K-12

Strand: Using Technology to Support Learning

Teach Geography through interactive technology and research with a purpose. Students utilize the Internet to take a "dream vacation". Students are given a "budget" of $2,000 to spend on a two week vacation. They must select a place where they have never been. Students compare the costs and advantages of each mode of transportation; airplane, train, boat, bus or car. They must research special events, weather, natural disasters, agricultural products, manufactured products, tourist attractions, sports, historical events, and Deaf Community information for the city/location of their choice. Students create a "virtual travel journal" to record what they might do during their two week visit. They must find a place or places to stay, and go to one classy restaurant. They are required to include "visits" to six of the tourist attractions below: National Park, museum, zoo or aquarium, mall or downtown area, sports stadium, amusement park or other leisure activity location, hiking or natural resource activity, theatre or show, and Deaf Community event (required). Students compile this information into a notebook for presentation to the class. They must create a 3 to 5 minute presentation for the class, complete with graphics and/or Power Point presentation and a bibliography.


Web-Based Curriculum Development for Chemistry and Biochemistry Using IdeaTools (M12P)

Craig, Paul Email: pacsch@rit.edu

Rochester Institute of Technology

Monday, June 25, 2001 — 4:30 PM

Location: LBJ [060] LBJ STREET

Type: Poster Audience: All

Strand: Online and Distance Education

IdeaTools is a combined Web authoring/course management system developed at NTID. It is being used by several NTID faculty to create interactive multimedia-enabled Web sites to support classroom teaching and Web-based distance learning. Simon Ting and coworkers developed IdeaTools' general Web authoring/course management functionality. Paul Craig and Simon have worked together to incorporate additional features that are specific for chemistry and biochemistry. Paul will demonstrate new IdeaTools functionality for authoring chemistry and biochemistry courses. Among the new tools demonstrated will be:

· Chime, for visualization of proteins

· Chemsketch, for chemical drawing

· WebEQ, for preparation and submission of chemical and mathematical equations on-line.

Existing features of IdeaTools have also been adapted for laboratory science course. This enables students to participate in discussions with each other and their instructor, and also to submit lab reports on-line. The on-line lab reports can contain text and attached files, such as spreadsheets and chemical drawings.


 

Use of Graphic Design Principles to Enhance the Learning Process (M3P)

Cutcliffe, Alan Email: abcnmp@rit.edu

National Technical Institute for the Deaf

Monday, June 25, 2001 — 4:30 PM

Location: LBJ [060] LBJ STREET

Type: Poster Audience: All

Strand: Using Technology to Support Learning

The effective visual presentation of course materials can help students' initial acceptance and ensuing participation in the learning process. Students in today's society are visually sophisticated consumers of all sorts of information. Whether or not they are consciously aware of it, students meet visual materials in every medium with jaded eyes, sparking potential interest or boredom.

This poster session will demonstrate that the tools of graphic design used in NTID's development of educational and marketing projects greatly enhance their effective delivery. CD-ROMS, websites, and print materials all present sophisticated hierarchies of information that require easy access and clear paths to understanding. A display of posters of recently completed projects, juxtaposed in 'before and after' versions, will demonstrate the effectiveness and necessity of general graphic design principles in achieving such goals. In addition, these projects will demonstrate techniques used to meet particular access issues for the Deaf and hard-of-hearing community. These projects will include the American Sign Language CD-ROM; the David Speechreading Program CD-ROM; the American Sign Language Dictionary and Inflection Guide CD-ROM; the Master of Science in Secondary Education website; the NTID Admissions Department CD-ROM; as well as a variety of additional printed materials.

Descriptions of graphic design principles will accompany each poster, and a more complete printed handout of guidelines will be available to symposium participants as reminders for later implementation in their own materials. Principles addressed in these posters include typography, color, legibility, readability, information hierarchy, and layout.

Also on display, and available for use, will be two computer stations so that symposium participants can explore several completed websites and CD-ROMs.


Postsecondary Education Network International Project (M10P)

DeCaro, James Email: jjd8074@rit.edu

National Technical Institute for the Deaf

Clymer, E. William - National Technical Institute for the Deaf

Araki, Tsutomu - Tsukuba College of Technology

Monday, June 25, 2001 — 4:30 PM

Location: LBJ [060] LBJ STREET

Type: Poster Audience: All

Strand: Using Technology to Support Learning

The Nippon Foundation of Japan is partnering with NTID/RIT and Japan's Tsukuba College of Technology (TCT) to establish a worldwide university network serving deaf students, entitled the Postsecondary Education Network International (PEN-International). This project is the first step in a multiyear partnership to technologically link universities around the world that serve deaf and hard-of-hearing people. PEN-International is undertaken to help universities apply state-of-the-art instructional technologies, improve and update their technical curriculum, and update their computer hardware and software for instruction. NTID and TCT are using their collective expertise in deaf education and technology to assist participating countries with faculty training; development of instructional products; and application of the worldwide web, information technology, and distance learning technologies to teaching and learning. NTID and TCT faculty will be teaching various information technologies and operating systems, as well as various multimedia and off-the-shelf software packages. In addition, student and faculty exchanges and joint ventures with information technology industries will be implemented. The long-term goals of the project are twofold: to equip deaf residents of participant countries with the skills needed to compete in a high technology workplace, and to prepare universities to share the knowledge and instructional products they develop with other colleges. PEN-International will enhance local capability and global networking at each participant institution. Participants will be moved from importers of 'know how' to self-sufficiency. As the project progresses, each institution will develop the capability to export what has been learned through the project to other programs serving people who are deaf. Over the five-year life of the project, PEN-International will work in as many as 10 different countries, with Tianjin College for the Deaf of Tianjin University of Technology (China) being the first, and the Center for the Deaf at Moscow State Technical University (Russia) to follow.


The Intellikeys Alternative Keyboard Solution (M6P)

Elliott, Lori Email: lelliott@asdb.state.az.us

Phoenix Day School for the Deaf

Monday, June 25, 2001 — 4:30 PM

Location: LBJ [060] LBJ STREET

Type: Poster Audience: K-12

Strand: Using Technology to Support Learning

The Intellitools alternative keyboard called the Intellikeys provides the students at the Phoenix Day School for the Deaf (PDSD) a unique access to the computer. This flat alternative keyboard provides a variety of keyboard layouts, called overlays. The overlays can be programmed to meet the physical, visual, and cognitive needs for all of our students. The overlays that come with the board use a bar code to activate it so there is no need to install software at each computer station. With the software "Overlay Maker" we are able to create custom keyboard layouts that are designed to reflect the curriculum needs of each student. The software "Overlay Maker" comes with a picture library that is used to create the custom keyboards. Language, Math, Social Studies, Communication lessons can all be created using the combination of software and alternative keyboard. The player version of this software allows us to use the various custom overlays throughout the school without installing the main program. The boards which are dual platform can be used as a keyboard and a mouse. At PDSD we use the alternative keyboards from Kindergarten on up. These alternative keyboards are used extensively with our multiple handicapped students. This poster presentation would present a hands on use of this hardware and software.


A Web-Supported Course for Deaf College-Aged Students (M4P)

Gottermeier, Linda Email: lggnca@rit.edu

National Technical Institute for the Deaf

Monday, June 25, 2001 — 4:30 PM

Location: LBJ [060] LBJ STREET

Type: Poster Audience: All

Strand: Strategies for Assessing the Impact of Technology in Teaching/Learning Process

Organizational Communication and the Deaf Employee was developed as an interactive course to allow students to learn from the experiences of alumni in the Rochester community. In order for deaf college-aged students to participate fully in lectures and discussion groups and still learn course content, they needed to be free of taking notes. Initially, Power Point presentations were developed for each lecture. At a later date, the Power Point presentations were linked to a web site. The web site also provided a link to articles on electronic reserve. Because the site was password protected, permission was given to access transcripts and discussions from sources such as the "National Public Radio Leadership Series" and the "Managing Your Career" articles in the Wall Street Journal. The goal of the web site was to provide a planned method delivering lecture notes, discussion summaries, and current business articles. During the first two quarters, when the web site was utilized, students were surveyed as to the usefulness of the site and if there were areas where it could be improved. The purpose of this poster session will be to: 1) Demonstrate the web site to conference attendees and 2) Summarize students' responses to the surveys.


Using Electronic Portfolio to Demonstrate Academic and Pedagogic Competencies (M11P)

Klein, Diane Email: deeklein@grove.iup.edu

Indiana University of Pennsylvania

Selmenda, Katharine - Converse College

Baker, Sharon - University of Tulsa

Monday, June 25, 2001 — 4:30 PM

Location: LBJ [060] LBJ STREET

Type: Poster Audience: All

Strand: Transition to Workplace

Today's technology requires that students be not only comfortable but also competent in the various multimedia components of computers. There is no better way for a student (at any stage of development or transition) to document the growth and competence in technology skills than trough the compilation and construction of an electronic portfolio. In order to successfully create an electronic portfolio, students must be able to use word processing software, digital photography, scanning hardware/software, and multitudes of other applications that are relevant to that student's area(s) of expertise. When all is collected, the student must also be able to demonstrate the organizational skills necessary to successfully format the content and materials in an accessible and easy to navigate form, and then save the product in an appropriate medium; disk, zip disk, or CD-ROM. This presentation will review the types of portfolios that are used by students as well as the procedures and strategies that students can follow to put together an electronic portfolio that will clearly demonstrate competency in both knowledge and technology. Examples of electronic portfolios will be available and the many technologies that might be incorporated when constructing a personal portfolio.


Clearinghouse On Mathematics, Engineering, Technology, and Science (COMETS): A Web-based Resource for Inservice and Preservice Teacher Education (M9P)

Lang, Harry Email: hgl9008@rit.edu

National Technical Institute for the Deaf

Kovalik, Gail - National Technical Institute for the Deaf

Monday, June 25, 2001 — 4:30 PM

Location: LBJ [060] LBJ STREET

Type: Poster Audience: All

Strand: Strategies for Assessing the Impact of Technology in Teaching/Learning Process

The National Science Foundation-funded grant project titled "Clearinghouse On Mathematics, Engineering, Technology, and Science (COMETS)" based at the National Technical Institute for the Deaf (NTID) is an interactive Web site that will address a variety of target audiences with information needs related to the education of deaf students.

The goals of the project are to: 1) develop a comprehensive resource to provide asynchronous information through interactive components to professionals, parents, and students available on the World Wide Web; 2) field-test the applicability of the information and dissemination strategies in both formal and informal professional development activities; and 3) develop a network for systemic change through information dissemination in the education of deaf students in science, education, mathematics, and technology.

This presentation will summarize how a network that includes teachers, administrators, support service professionals, parents, and representatives from organizations critical to systemic reform in the education of deaf students will work together with a web-based resource to effect positive change in mathematics, science, and engineering education. Information to be shared in the web site will be based on the most recent research. A rationale for this method of distance education for professional development will also be provided.


How are Teachers for the Deaf Using the Internet to Educate K-12 Deaf and Hard of Hearing students? (M5P)

Lauria, Dino Email: djlnet@ritvax.isc.rit.edu

National Technical Institute of the Deaf

Monday, June 25, 2001 — 4:30 PM

Location: LBJ [060] LBJ STREET

Type: Poster Audience: K-12

Strand: Using Technology to Support Learning

Today teachers are using the Internet to educate deaf and hard of hearing elementary (K-12) students today in residential and mainstream schools. This symposium topic will: to provide a number of residential and mainstream school URLs (Universal Resource Locator) from around the world, discover what they have to offer, and determine if resources are significant to consider forming a community for specific needs. The goal is to identify the array of possibilities that can be developed when using the Internet (other than simply saving materials).

The research for this project began by collecting a list of the many residential and mainstream schools. Then the information on their web sites was analyzed. Finally, this information — school name, history, mission statement, course materials, how they used the Internet with their students — was analyzed to determine if the school uses any new strategies for student education.

Since a variety of information was discovered, this presentation will present and interpret the results. It will also suggest how educators should use the resources on-line as a main tool to deliver information that would be appropriate for remote learners, secondary tutoring, and self-interest research among K-12 students.


Supporting ASL Learning through Interactive CD ROM Technology

The American Sign Language Vocabulary CD (M7P)

Newell, Ph.D., William Email: wjnncd@rit.edu

National Technical Institute of the Deaf

Young, Marsha A. - National Technical Institute for the Deaf

Dorn, Cecelia - National Technical Institute for the Deaf

Monday, June 25, 2001 — 4:30 PM

Location: LBJ [060] LBJ STREET

Type: Poster Audience: All

Strand: Using Technology to Support Learning

One important aspect of learning American Sign Language is drill and practice leading to mastery of vocabulary. The American Sign Language CD affords learners of ASL the opportunity to practice ASL vocabulary using three primary interactive strategies: (1) Look It Up, (2) Receptive Drill, and (3) Expressive Drill. Within these three interactive instructional strategies users can view and practice approximately 2000 ASL signs by (1) Alphabetical Listing of main glosses and synonyms, (2) Categories and (3) the user's Own List. This CD, therefore, provides a useful resource for learners as an adjunct to classroom instruction and can be used in conjunction with any ASL curriculum.

This poster session will present the American Sign Language Vocabulary CD and demonstrate the instructional strategies for drill and practice of ASL vocabulary. Information regarding design and programming considerations will be included. Data regarding evaluation of this learning tool will be presented.


Using HyperStudio to Enhance Language and Reading Instruction (M1P)

Pitt, Brent Email: brentp@usdb.k12.ut.us

Utah Schools for the Deaf and the Blind

Monday, June 25, 2001 — 4:30 PM

Location: LBJ [060] LBJ STREET

Type: Poster Audience: K-12

Strand: Using Technology to Support Learning

Several years ago I started experimenting with HyperStudio to create drill-and-practice stacks for "Reading Milestones". I noticed that the students were much more interested in reading and in completing the worksheets if they could use the computer. I ended up getting permission from the publisher and converting the first four books in the series to HyperStudio stacks. From there, I started teaching others how to do it. I have conducted training for teachers of the deaf at the Ohio School for the Deaf and in Michigan. I am working with a teacher here in Utah who will allow me to bring some of her materials to demonstrate as well. I would present each user with a CD that they could take with them to assist in adapting their own materials in their schools.


Microsoft Office ASL Project: An Interactive Resource for Teaching Deaf Students Technical Information (M2P)

Reeves, June Email: jbrncm@rit.edu

National Technical Institute for the Deaf

Monday, June 25, 2001 — 4:30 PM

Location: LBJ [060] LBJ STREET

Type: Poster Audience: All

Strand: Using Technology to Support Learning

Instructors of deaf and hard-of-hearing students often have the expertise and knowledge required to teach technical content, but lack the sign language skill needed to select and use signs for teaching highly specialized technical information. In order to provide effective instruction for their deaf and hard of hearing students, instructors therefore should have access to a variety of resources designed to support their development of sign language skills for communicating technical information. This poster session describes a project designed to provide a computerized interactive display of American Sign Language (ASL) signs and sentences appropriate for teaching technical concepts in the National Technical Institute for the Deaf course "Applications Software" offered in the Applied Computer Technology major. Terminology was collected from instructors in the major and signs selected for appropriateness in consultation with native signers in this technical field. A CD ROM that presents the target signs in isolation and in a variety of context appropriate sentences was produced. The ASL sentences explain concepts important to "Applications Software". Copies of the Applications Software CD were distributed to instructors of the course and put in a lab for use by students. This format allows students and their teachers to have easy and random access to sign language for technical terminology and the use of this terminology in teaching contexts. Use of this instructional CD can improve students and instructors skills in effectively communicating technical information via sign language, thus improving accessibility of technical information for deaf / HH students. The procedures used in this project are applicable to developing sign language instructional materials for technical information in all natural signed languages.


Captioned Media Program (M8P)

Updegraff, Melanie Email: mjupdegraff@smsdk12.org

St. Mary's School for the Deaf

Monday, June 25, 2001 — 4:30 PM

Location: LBJ [060] LBJ STREET

Type: Poster Audience: All

Strand: Using Technology to Support Learning

The Captioned Media Program (CMP) is a government funded program providing open-captioned, free-loan educational and entertainment media (currently videos and CD-ROMs) to all D/HH persons, their families, and professionals working within deaf communities. The CMP collection contains materials appropriate for Ps-13+, with over 4,000 titles, and over 350 subjects. The mission of the CMP is to provide all persons who are deaf or hard of hearing with awareness of and access to communication and learning through the use of captioned educational media and supportive collateral materials. Entering the 21st century, the ultimate goal of the CMP is to permit media to be an integral part in the lifelong learning process for all stakeholders in the deaf and hard of hearing community; adults, students, parents, and educators.


A Web-Based Initiative to Infuse English Across the Curriculum for Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing Students (T4P)

Berent, Gerald Email: gpbnci@rit.edu

National Institute for the Deaf

Clymer, E. William - National Technical Institute for the Deaf

Tuesday, June 26, 2001 — 8:30 AM

Location: LBJ [060] LBJ STREET

Type: Poster Audience: All

Strand: Online and Distance Education

In this poster session the presenters will demonstrate their "Supporting English Acquisition" (SEA) web site and will outline a collaborative, web-based effort to infuse English teaching principles and methods into technical, math, science, and social science courses taken by students at the National Technical Institute for the Deaf (NTID). This broad-based effort involves faculty in NTID's Center for Research, Teaching and Learning, the Center for Arts and Sciences, and the Center for Technical Studies, as well as peer tutors in the NTID Learning Center. Because English remains a formidable challenge to most NTID Students, the goal of this effort is to provide teachers with on-line professional development which will enable and empower them to promote their students' English skill development within the naturalistic context of their specific course content. The presenters will provide an overview of the current expansion of the SEA site and demonstrate the site's modules, which contain grammatical summaries, interactive guided practice, and suggestions for supplementing course content with easy-to-implement English activities. The presenters will also summarize the stages of the broad-based "English across the curriculum" initiative that employs the SEA site and which includes a needs assessment for continued expansion of the site, the authoring of new site modules by English-teaching faculty, the implementation of site suggestions by NTID faculty, the monitoring of students' English progress in content classrooms, and a summative evaluation of the initiative.


Virtual Reality Education for Assisted Learning (VREAL) (T15P)

Edge, Robert Email: bob.edge@veridian.com

VREAL Consortium

Tuesday, June 26, 2001 — 8:30 AM

Location: LBJ [060] LBJ STREET

Type: Poster Audience: All

Strand: Using Technology to Support Learning

This project is funded by the U.S. Department of Education under a Grant sponsored by the Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services (OSERS). The VREAL Consortium consists of the University of Central Florida (UCF), Orange County (FL) Public Schools (OCPS), The National Center for Simulation (NSC), Illinois, Western Pennsylvania, Ohio Schools for the Deaf, Florida School for the Deaf and Blind and Veridian Information Solutions.This project, utilizing virtual reality technologies combined with other educational methodologies, focuses on the early development of children with hearing impairment, and also has application to adults. It has the potential to facilitate living skills development and provide academic instruction such as Math and English to the very large base of those with this impairment. Using virtual reality in the school system to educate and train deaf and hard of hearing individuals can open new doors of opportunity for students, adults and teachers, giving them near-real-world scenarios they could never experience otherwise. The use of virtual reality can improve individual child safety. Virtually exposing students to hazardous and dangerous situations will decrease mishaps and instill confidence in the student to face difficult situations. Simple tasks, such as basic math concepts, or crossing the street safely, can be taught in virtual reality. There is a myriad of potential tasks that can be tailored to the individual's needs, resulting in greater confidence and competence for all disabilities.


Video Communication System (T2P)

Elliott, Lori Email: lelliott@asdb.state.az.us

Phoenix Day School for the Deaf

Tuesday, June 26, 2001 — 8:30 AM

Location: LBJ [060] LBJ STREET

Type: Poster Audience: K-12

Strand: Using Technology to Support Learning

Communication is the key to a well-run school. Sharing information, motivating students, recognizing achievement, and emergency warnings all need to be communicated on a daily basis to all student and faculty. In schools with hearing students intercom systems provide this type of communication. However, more and more schools are going to a visual means of communication which is necessary for deaf students.

At the Phoenix Day School for the Deaf we have been able to provide this type of information in a visual format using our in house television system. With limited funds we have been able to provide televised announcements and a universal clock through out our campus. Building this vast system ourselves allowed us to develop it with a great savings as compared to contracted vendors. Getting the equipment in place was only the beginning. Creation of daily slide shows and training on the use of the emergency system have increased the effectiveness of this mode of communication. This poster presentation would share lists of equipment needed to set up this type of system, demonstration of the slide show component, and explanation of the emergency system.


Demonstration of MAGpie 2.0 Software for Creating Captions and Audio Descriptions (T5P)

Freed, Geoff Email: geoff_freed@wgbh.org

CPB/WGBH National Center for Accessible Media

Tuesday, June 26, 2001 — 8:30 AM

Location: LBJ [060] LBJ STREET

Type: Poster Audience: All

Strand: Using Technology to Support Learning

Developers of Web- and CD-ROM-based multimedia need an authoring application for making their materials accessible to persons with disabilities. The CPB/WGBH National Center for Accessible Media (NCAM) has developed such a tool, the Media Access Generator (MAGpie), for distribution in SDKs, on the Web, CD-ROM and other methods. Using MAGpie, authors can add captions to three multimedia formats: Apple's QuickTime, the World Wide Web Consortium's Synchronized Multimedia Integration Language and Microsoft's Synchronized Accessible Media Interchange (SAMI) MAGpie can also integrate audio descriptions into SMIL presentations. MAGpie is the ideal authoring environment for multimedia specialists, publishing companies or service providers who want to add captions, subtitles and audio descriptions to their work. This poster session will briefly demonstrate MAGpie's capabilities. Copies of the software will be available on CD-ROM, as well.


 

What's Worthwhile on the Web (T6P)

Kurlychek, Ken Email: ken.Kurlychek@gallaudet.edu

Laurent Clerc National Deaf Education Center

Steed, Lori - Parent of deaf child

Tuesday, June 26, 2001 — 8:30 AM

Location: LBJ [060] LBJ STREET

Type: Poster Audience: K-12

Strand: Online and Distance Education

So many Web sites, so little time! Parents, teachers, and administrators are simply too busy these days to wend their way around the Web looking for information, resources, or assistance. That's why the presenters have spent hours evaluating sites around the gallaudet.edu that focus on the needs of deaf and hard of hearing children and the professional who serve them. They have summarized their content and organized them by supporting department.

Particular attention will be paid to the KidsWorld Deaf Net Web site recently launched by Gallaudet's Laurent Clerc National Deaf Education Center as well as the Software to Go project, and Odyssey and World Around You magazines.


Creating Age-Appropriate Instructional Materials for Deaf Students with Minimal Language Skills (T7P)

Moseley, Brad Email: brad.moseley@asd-1817.org

American School for the Deaf

Farquhar, Anita - American School for the Deaf

Chatterton, Jennifer - American School for the Deaf

Tuesday, June 26, 2001 — 8:30 AM

Location: LBJ [060] LBJ STREET

Type: Poster Audience: K-12

Strand: Using Technology to Support Learning

Quad 1 is a team of teachers at American School for the Deaf serving Deaf students with Special Needs (DSN). Mental retardation, visual impairments, cerebral palsy, emotional disturbances, behavioral disturbances, aphasia, severe learning disabilities, and developmental disabilities are some of the handicapping conditions these students have in addition to their deafness. We also serve students with minimal language skills and minimal-to-no prior educational experience. Our team of teachers works closely to plan and make learning visual, meaningful, and applicable to independent living situations. A major part of this is the development of functional level/age appropriate materials. These materials are created through the use of technology.

The purpose of this presentation is to share ideas, skills, and knowledge related to technology in helping this population of Deaf Special Needs students. We will share with you how the use of digital cameras, PowerPoint, a Smart Board, LCD projectors, and a Mimio aide the process of creating materials geared toward the functional levels of each student in an age appropriate manner resulting in enhanced comprehension, information transfer, and recollection of the students.


 

ACCESS: Applying Computers Creatively to Enhance Student Skills (T9P)

Perez, Dana Email: dperez@sunshinecottage.org

Sunshine Cottage School for Deaf Children

Tuesday, June 26, 2001 — 8:30 AM

Location: LBJ [060] LBJ STREET

Type: Poster Audience: K-12

Strand: Using Technology to Support Learning

The purpose of Access: Applying Computers Creatively to Enhance Student Skills is to engage students in active learning that is stimulating, encouraging and self motivating. Students learn to integrate curriculum based projects with the use of technology, and therefore use computers as a tool for learning. The mail goals of Access is for students to gain knowledge of the parts, function, and use of computer technology, to produce multimedia presentations from curriculum content materials, to work as a team to create a newsletter publications, to create special projects, and to develop a personal portfolio to include work completed, interests, and other student information. This Presentation, or Poster Session, will demonstrate specific activities that help to accomplish these goals. An overview of Technology Literacy from Basic Skills to Communication Skills, then to Creative Skills will be discuss. Then sample projects will be viewed to show how to incorporate the school curriculum and other learning goals into Technology Education. Specifically, one project titled: "Let's Talk About Our Hearing" will be shown. This project is a template that taught the students how to plot and understand their audiogram, and be able to explain their audiogram to others.


American Sign Language Dictionary and Inflection Guide (T12P)

Poor, Geoffrey Email: gspncm@rit.edu

National Technical Institute for the Deaf

Wilkins, Dorothy - National Technical Institute for the Deaf

Tuesday, June 26, 2001 — 8:30 AM

Location: LBJ [060] LBJ STREET

Type: Poster Audience: All

Strand: Using Technology to Support Learning

This presentation will describe the process and technology used in the development of an ASL Dictionary and Inflection Guide. When completed, it will have QuickTime movies of approximately 3,000 signs, plus 600 ASL sentences showing those signs with their natural inflections, along with text English translations. It will be thoroughly searchable and interactive, and is being funded by the Department of Education (under the FIPSE program), the Pforzheimer and Gannett Foundations, and NTID/RIT.

Topics discussed will be: 1) the reason for creating this new resource and it innovative aspects; 2) the processes and procedures used for language decisions; 3) and the applications of technology (digital video, CD-ROM) and database management (Microsoft Excel, Macromedia Director, iMovie), etc.


 

Bring Your Camera on the Road to New York State Standards (T8P)

Potanovic, George Email: gpotanovic@nysd.k12.ny.us

New York School for the Deaf

Tuesday, June 26, 2001 — 8:30 AM

Location: LBJ [060] LBJ STREET

Type: Poster Audience: K-12

Strand: Using Technology to Support Learning

Whoever said, "One picture is worth one thousand words" must have realized that photography, once thought to be high-technology when it was first introduced over 150 years ago, continues to be a powerful medium for observation and analysis. This is especially true when teaching English Language Arts and descriptive or expressive writing skills to deaf students.

In the fast-moving world of video-enhanced, multimedia educational software, a simple pair of scissors and a newspaper or magazine can provide teachers with access to a wealth of dramatic still images. A photograph can engage student curiosity, unlike any other media, and facilitates the teacher's ability to elicit student response and experience. A photographic image can be studied without interruption - providing student and teacher time to think, ponder, discuss, analyze and compare ideas and observations. Photographs can be used to introduce or review new vocabulary, concepts and stimulate interest in subject content, which often cross over the traditional lines of science, social studies, geography, math, language and the arts.

At NYSD, photography workshops support our objectives for the New York State Learning Standards in English Language Arts and Social Studies. Photographs encourage our students to think about traditional subjects differently, discover relationships they might not have otherwise considered, develop an understanding of diverse social, historical and cultural dimensions in our society, challenge their thoughts and opinions and become inspired with a greater interest in both writing and reading.

Classroom projects, using a strong visual and thematic approach, seem to help students focus their thinking skills and organize ideas with a common emphasis on language and writing. For example, one class created photo-journals, which they exchanged with a deaf school in Kenya, Africa as part of a coordinated Social Studies and English lesson plan about "community." Another student used advertising photography to further develop her vocational interest and understanding of graphic art and design.

Our classes primarily use 35 mm film, processed for color prints and digitized onto Kodak Picture Disks and Photo CDs. Students use the Kodak Picture Disk software, Microsoft PowerPoint, Adobe Photoshop and QuarkXPress to present both the process and the results of their efforts to fellow students and teachers.


Social Studies and the Internet (T10P)

Rust, Mark Email: rustma@msd.edu

Maryland School for the Deaf (Frederick)

Tuesday, June 26, 2001 — 8:30 AM

Location: LBJ [060] LBJ STREET

Type: Poster Audience: K-12

Strand: Using Technology to Support Learning

Social Studies School Service has put together a wonderful site for the classroom teacher that helps integrate technology and Social Studies skills for grades 5-12. In our day of performance assessments, www.socialstudies.com has compiled a multitude of lessons and Unit Plans that rely on the Web. Each unit has clearly defined goals and an assessment portion that is hands-on and ready to use. Each unit is designed for collaborative learning but can be done independently as well. The lessons are designed by classroom teachers from California and are very practical as well as innovative. Watch your students' motivation increase as they begin to develop computer literacy skills along with social studies skills.


The Write Technology (T1P)

Strassman, Barbara Email: strassma@tcnj.edu

The College of New Jersey

Tuesday, June 26, 2001 — 8:30 AM

Location: LBJ [060] LBJ STREET

Type: Poster Audience: All

Strand: Online and Distance Education

The Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) Amendments of 1997 (Public Law 105-17) expects that children classified with a disability will be included in the general education curriculum. By 2003, twenty-six states will have tied graduation from high school with passing the respective statewide assessments of the general education curriculum (Randall, McAnally, Rittenhouse, Russell, Sorensen, 2000). Furthermore, students classified with a disability are expected, unless specifically exempted by their IEPs, to be included in the statewide assessments. The nature of these assessments places a heavy emphasis on writing in all subject areas. Many states use a rubric for scoring these assessments. Specifically in the language arts assessment, writing is assessed primarily for higher-order writing skills: content, organization, and cohesion and only minimally for mechanics. Despite the controversy surrounding these tests, such rubrics do reflect the skills needed for effective writing (Pressley, McGoldrick, Cariglia-Bull & Symons, 1995). Through an on going Interactive Television (ITV) Writer's Workshop, deaf high school students and preservice teachers of the deaf have become writing partners. Through the use of video recordings within a PowerPoint show this presentation will demonstrate: 1. The effectiveness of ITV for individualizing the teaching/learning process of writing, 2. The importance of conferencing to improving the writing abilities of deaf high school students and the teaching skills of preservice teachers of the deaf and hard of hearing, 3. The capability of deaf students to participate in statewide assessments.


Deaf President Now Interactive (T13P)

Terry, Janet Email: jterry@mail.sandi.net

Madison High School

Brody, Joyce - Madison High School

Tuesday, June 26, 2001 — 8:30 AM

Location: LBJ [060] LBJ STREET

Type: Poster Audience: All

Strand: Using Technology to Support Learning

In 2001, many Deaf students are unaware of the historic events that occurred in March of 1988. Students work in collaborative groups to create a presentation. This project explores the perspectives of the major participants in the Deaf President Now (DPN) movement. Students make a DPN timeline utilizing graphics, text and iMovies. They research answers to teacher questions utilizing web-sites provided by the teacher and add their own bookmarks. The students identify the rights and freedoms guaranteed by the Bill of Rights that were exercised by students in the DPN protests. They also identify DPN actions that could possibly have been illegal. They explain the kinds of decisions that each DPN participant had to make. They then create survey questions about the Deaf President Now movement and e-mail them to two other Deaf Programs. The answers are compiled into spreadsheets and graphs. Inspiration, a brainstorming courseware program utilizing graphic organizers, clustering and outlining, is used to organize the information. The entire project is incorporated into a Power Point presentation. For the "technology-challenged" educator, this project can also be organized and presented on paper and posterboard. Each example will be shown at this session.


Online Bookclubs Using Free Internet E-Boards (T3P)

Warren, Denise Email: denisew@usdb.k12.ut.us

Utah Schools for the Deaf and Blind

Tuesday, June 26, 2001 — 8:30 AM

Location: LBJ [060] LBJ STREET

Type: Poster Audience: K-12

Strand: Using Technology to Support Learning

Eboards are wonderful, free online tools with many uses. USDB is running an experimental program with a group of Deaf Jr. High and High School classes from all over the state of Utah. The classes are reading the same book in their own classrooms, then discussing it online. The eboard was set up and is maintained by a moderator. Available on the eboard is an optional worksheet with comprehension questions and vocabulary, and most importantly a "chat question" to discuss, for each chapter of the book. A grading rubric was made available for those teachers who wished to use it. Students answer the chat question and respond to each other on the eboard. The board is password protected and unavailable to outsiders as it is not linked to anything. The moderator has the ability to go in and delete inappropriate posts if necessary.

The students have been enthusiastic about the project. They really enjoy knowing that the online discussion is waiting for them at the end of the chapter. As the unit progresses, progress can clearly be seen in the students' technical ability, ability to stay on topic, level of thinking about the question, ability to respond to others' posts, and in written grammar, punctuation and capitalization.

Future hopes for the project include book collaboration for lower grades, more book units available, and inclusion of Deaf students and teachers around the country!


Technology to Support Visually-Impaired Deaf & Hard-of-Hearing Students (T10D)

Wallber, Josara Email: jmwnci@rit.edu

National Technical Institute for the Deaf

Tuesday, June 26, 2001 — 10:00 AM

Location: LBJ [060] 1510

Type: Formal Audience: All

Strand: Using Technology to Support Learning

Due to concomitant etiologies, many deaf and hard-of-hearing students also have impaired vision. Following a basic overview of normal vision and typical refractive error (why people use glasses) this session will discuss the incidence of impaired vision, particularly Usher Syndrome, among deaf & hard-of-hearing students. This session will then explore techniques & technologies for supporting classroom instruction, from communication to materials. To assist in understanding, participants will have the opportunity to experience various types of vision loss, particularly the 'tunnel vision' associated with Usher Syndrome.


CART in the Classroom: How to Make Realtime Captioning Work for You (T10B)

Smith, Duane Email: dsmith@reporting.org

National Court Reporters Association

Graves, Pat - Caption First

Tuesday, June 26, 2001 — 10:00 AM

Location: LBJ [060] 2590

Type: Formal Audience: All

Strand: Using Technology to Support Learning

Communication Access Realtime Translation (CART) is a word-for-word speech-to-text interpreting service for people with a hearing loss or who would otherwise benefit from this accommodation. The Americans with Disabilities Act specifically recognizes CART as an assistive technology that affords effective communication access. And the demand for CART service in the classroom is growing at a rapid rate at all levels of the educational spectrum, from elementary school to college.

This paper focuses on how CART can help make deaf or hard-of-hearing students more successful in school. For example, CART allows students to be independent learners and participate fully in class discussions. CART can also benefit the instructor, giving him or her an additional tool for preparing tests or integrating information into a research study.

The success of this method, of course, rests on the skills of the CART provider. This paper touches on what can be expected of a competent CART provider (professionalism, ethics, training, etc.), the environments where the skills of a CART provider can best be applied, and how the CART provider and instructor, in collaboration with the coordinator of services, can work together to ensure this service meets the needs of the deaf or hard-of-hearing student.


Two Streams of Captions for Children's Television (T10C)

Loeterman, Mardi Email: mardi_loeterman@wgbh.org

CPB/WGBH National Center for Accessible Media

Paul, Peter Ph.D. - Ohio State University, College of Ed.

Tuesday, June 26, 2001 — 10:00 AM

Location: LBJ [060] 3237

Type: Formal Audience: K-12

Strand: Using Technology to Support Learning

The popular children's television program, Arthur, will soon be broadcast with two streams of captions-- the original, near-verbatim captions, and edited captions. The intended audience for edited captions-- which have a slower presentation rate and modified language-- are elementary-aged children who are not fluent readers and who cannot make use of the program audio. This presentation will discuss what is edited in edited captions and implications for children's enjoyment and understanding of television programs. The presenters will also describe a study, begun in January 2001, which is researching the following questions: 1) Is there a difference in children's comprehension scores between the near-verbatim and edited videos? 2) Is there an effect due to the type of assessment used? and 3) What are the children's preferences and attitudes with respect to the captioned programs in the study and to captioned media in general? The edited captioning and research project are funded by the U.S. Department of Education.


NTID's Educational Technology Resource Room

A Supportive Environment for Acquisition and Application of Instructional Technologies (T10E)

Young, Marsha Email: mayncp@rit.edu

National Technical Institute for the Deaf

Tuesday, June 26, 2001 — 10:00 AM

Location: LBJ [060] 3355 [ETRR]

Type: Formal Audience: All

Strand: Using Technology to Support Learning

The Educational Technology Resource Room (ETRR) exists to support faculty/staff development of new and innovative applications of technology in the education of deaf persons. Equipped with a variety of advanced Mac and PC computer hardware and software, scanners, printers, CD & DVD burners, video editing equipment, video captioning equipment, and digital video & still cameras, the ETRR provides access to advanced technology tools, and electronic and print resources to support curriculum and instruction, research, public information, and classroom technologies. The ETRR is staffed by professionals and students on a regular weekly schedule. Additionally, institute experts in technology work and consult in the ETRR. These individuals are available for consultation regarding the implementation of technology as well as on-the-spot answers to software/equipment questions. Services include designing training programs, developing instructional materials related to the use of new technologies, and supporting the learning of new software packages. Demonstrations and workshops are available on a regular basis and may also be schedule for special groups or topics. Our overall goal is to collaboratively explore ways in which technologies enhance classroom instruction, research and professional development. This presentation will include the philosophy behind the design and implementation of this resource room, the strengths of our staffing model, the diversity of training and support available through the ETRR, and the range and frequency of recorded usage.


Impact of SMART Boards on Learning Instruction (T10A)

Stifter, Rosemary Email: rosemary.stifter@gallaudet.edu

Laurent Clerc National Deaf Education Center

Tuesday, June 26, 2001 — 10:00 AM

Location: LBJ [060] PANARA THEATRE

Type: Formal Audience: K-12

Strand: Using Technology to Support Learning

In the fall of 2000, one SMART Board was placed in each of eight Academic teams, Curriculum Enhancement Team, and Student Life at the Model Secondary School for the Deaf and the Kendall Demonstration Elementary School for teachers and staff to use. Since that time the SMART Board has had a huge impact on the improved use and integration of technology in our classrooms. The SMART Board creates a much better visual environment for teaching, presenting, training, and interactive group learning for deaf and hard of hearing people. This equipment helps in focusing attention, provides more visual information, and frees the teacher or presenter's hands for better ASL communication (no mouse or remote control is needed.) Our teachers/staff are currently exploring this new teaching environment and will continue to test and search for new ways to use this visual medium to best advantage. This presentation will share examples of how teachers, staff, and students from high school to preschool are using the SMART board for various activities in their classrooms.


 

NTID Learning Consortium (T11E)

Finton, Ken Email: kwfdis@rit.edu

National Technical Institute for the Deaf

Mumford, Bonnie - National Technical Institute for the Deaf

Failing, Mindi - National Technical Institute for the Deaf

Tuesday, June 26, 2001 — 11:00 AM

Location: LBJ [060] 2450, 2470 LEARNING CENTER

Type: Formal Audience: All

Strand: Using Technology to Support Learning

This session will include a tour of the NTID Learning Center (NLC) and demonstrations of technological resources that are available to support instructional and educational strategies that fosters individual and collective learning opportunities. The following are resources that will be demonstrated.

* General NLC area has over 50 Macs and PCs available for use by students, faculty & staff. Specific program related software(s) are available to support classroom instruction.

* 'Smart Classroom' which supports instructional innovation through incorporating computer & multi-media based technologies and serves as a site for distance learning innovations. The classroom has 'interface capabilities' allowing teacher-directed exchange of information from the Smart Podium to individual computer workstations and from individual workstations to the classroom-wide display.

* Tutoring Support by individual faculty members is available without an appointment. Schedules are built at the onset of each quarter. Currently, students receive tutoring support from Math/Science, English, Accounting, and Science Support departments.

* Videoconferencing technology for formal instruction, connection with guest speakers/experts, multi-school project collaboration, professional development activities, meetings, and international events. To accommodate different size audiences at NTID, videoconferencing can be accessed from a variety of locations throughout the Lyndon B. Johnston building, including large conference rooms, smart classrooms, the Panara Theatre, and the Spoken Language Learning Practice Lab.

* Fiber Optics technology is available between the Carey Building and the NLC. Students taking courses in Fiber Optics can experiment with the technology and solve problems that are planted by their instructor. Students are able to converse on-line visually while doing this experiment.

* Three (3) classrooms are available for individual and group activities. Available space for individual studying, group studying, project work, and periodic instructor & student interaction during these activities is important for the learning community.


Innovative ways of using ICT (Information & Communication Technology) to improve literacy and communication skills for deaf learners (T11B)

Carter, Ken Email: ken@deafax.org

Deafax Trust

Lansdown, Helen - University of Reading

James, Matthew - University of Reading

Tuesday, June 26, 2001 — 11:00 AM

Location: LBJ [060] 2590

Type: Formal Audience: K-12

Strand: Using Technology to Support Learning

The importance of interaction both in terms of human communication and through the use of ICT to enhance communication skills and promote best practice in improving literacy levels will be explored at the Symposium. The Deafchild UK telecommunications and literacy programmes, including modules on a wide range of learning technologies which are part of 3 levels, will be reviewed. Literacy software and materials have been created in such a way that they are stimulating, challenging, fun and easy to use. The multi-media options include video pictures, computer graphics, English text, voice over and sign systems. The innovative work concerned with Teacher of the Deaf ICT training will be outlined to show how distance learning modules can be used for worldwide use. The Deafchild International Project (www.deafchild.org) aims to share with deaf children and their schools our experience in making communication challenging and highly educative. We see it as a catalyst for the creation of personal and educational opportunities for deaf and hearing children to communicate with each other throughout the world. There are 600 registered website users from 30 countries. The Research Programme, the first of its kind in the UK, has been established to evaluate the real impact of these developments in ICT on the achievement of deaf learners, both in educational and social terms.


Implementing Video Streamed Instruction for Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing Online Learners (T11C)

Mallory, James Email: jrmnet@rit.edu

National Technical Institute for the Deaf

Tuesday, June 26, 2001 — 11:00 AM

Location: LBJ [060] 3237

Type: Formal Audience: All

Strand: Online and Distance Education

Videotaped instruction has been an effective delivery tool for deaf online learners for many years, but it may soon be replaced by videostreaming. Videostreamed instruction delivered via the web is finally becoming a viable option today because more students are connected to the Web at higher access speeds at home, work or school. Videostreaming is not readily adapted and widely used for deaf learners in technical, online courses due to many factors, including: the speed at which some learners are connected; size of streamed video files vs. the clarity of the video which is to be streamed; readability of sign language if the video also includes a white board or projection from a computer monitor; cost and complexity of producing, digitizing, compressing and posting streamed video; size of the server where digitized streaming video files will be stored; captioning requirements of streamed video; and the necessity to interface with other software such as Flash™ for readable instructional modules. NTID has successfully implemented videostreamed modules in some of its online Visual Basic (VB) programming courses designed for remote deaf learners. This presentation will be followed by interactive discussions with the audience regarding this instructional delivery.


PEPNet Online Training for Students Who are Deaf or Hard of Hearing: Preparing for College Success (T11A)

Wilcox Hsu, Debra Email: debra.Wilcox@sptc.mnscu.edu

Midwest Center for Postsecondary Outreach

Buchkoski, David - Midwest Center for Postsecondary Outreach

Kovitz, Marcia - Postsecondary Consortium Network

Jursik, Kay - Postsecondary Consortium Network

Sanderson, Gary - Western Region Outreach and Consortia Center

Billies, Pat - Northeast Technical Center

Tuesday, June 26, 2001 — 11:00 AM

Location: LBJ [060] PANARA THEATRE

Type: Formal Audience: All

Strand: Online and Distance Education

The Postsecondary Education Programs Network presents one-hour of online training designed to provide students who are deaf and hard of hearing with information and skills they will need to be successful in college. PEPNet, is the national collaboration of the four Regional Postsecondary Education Centers for Individuals who are Deaf and Hard of Hearing. The Centers are supported by contracts with the U.S. Department of Education, Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services. The goal of PEPNet is to assist postsecondary institutions across the nation to attract and effectively serve individuals who are Deaf and Hard of Hearing. We recommend this training for students age 14-21 who are deaf or hard of hearing. The training is offered free of charge and is available at www.pepnet.org. The online training is entitled "Postsecondary Success Students Who are Deaf or Hard of Hearing". Students who complete the training may download and print an official certificate of completion issued by PEPNet. Upon completion of the course students will be able to: 1) describe accommodations available to college students who are deaf and hard of hearing, 2) explain the difference between high school and college expectations, 3) identify communication strategies that students who are deaf and hard of hearing may use in college 4) apply skills for communicating with students, faculty, administration, and staff 5) explain implications of ADA and 504 for college students who are deaf or hard of hearing 6) identify study skills. This presentation will include a demonstration of the online training, a discussion of training applications and an opportunity for hands-on participation in the training.


NTID's High Technology Center: A model of a centralized, industry funded, cross curricular, multipurpose graphic media and publishing facility (T130E)

Mineck, Edward Email: ed@mail.rit.edu

National Technical Institute for the Deaf

Tuesday, June 26, 2001 — 1:30 PM

Location: 007 A321

Type: Formal Audience: All

Strand: Using Technology to Support Learning

NTID opened the High Technology Center for Electronic Publishing and Imaging (HTC) in October, 1992, to meet the continuing challenges of providing on-going access to state-of-the art equipment and software in the area of graphic media and publishing technology. The HTC can serve as a model for addressing some of the special problems technology has imposed on curricular content and on the methods of delivery in education. The HTC offers centralized access to technology by faculty across multiple departments for: research and testing; hands-on technical experience; professional development; the publishing and production of state-of-the-art teaching support materials; and, curriculum development and delivery. The HTC is special in that it has no operating budget per se, nor is it the benefactor of a trust. Virtually all of the approximately four million dollars worth of software, hardware, equipment, supplies, service contracts, and technology it houses have been donated to the center by industry. The greater institute (college) provides the remainder of required support through: the host department, faculty release time, various travel budgets, the division of college advancement, and the host department's division office. This presentation will tour the HTC and describe its history: its original and its evolved purposes and mission, its structure and management; and, its successes and failures.


 

Developing a Successful A-Team for Teaching ASL on a Broadband Network (T130B)

Keefe, Barbara Email: barbara.keefe@fc.baxter.pvt.k12.me.us

University of Maine System Network

Gatehouse, Sally - Gov. Baxter School for the Deaf

Fairfield, Sharon - Gardiner High School

Tuesday, June 26, 2001 — 1:30 PM

Location: LBJ [060] 2590

Type: Formal Audience: K-12

Strand: Online and Distance Education

Distance learning programs require organization, planning, patience, and a sense of humor. Good distance learning programs provide blueprints for others to follow when developing programs regardless of the subject matter being delivered. This presentation will focus on the resources necessary to provide for the delivery of an American Sign Language course over Maine's asynchronous transfer mode (ATM) network to high school students as a modern language.

The presenters will share the administrative model used in Maine to maximize dynamic interactions between student and teacher, student and student, teacher and curriculum, and student, teacher & technology. A Memorandum of Understanding (MOU), outlining the responsibilities of the broadcast and receive sites related to the implementation of the distance learning class will be reviewed. Video segments demonstrating the technology, teaching strategies and class related activities would be shared along with tips on managing different school's bell schedules and grading periods.

The presentation will offer an awareness of the possibilities and challenges of a distance learning initiative through three distinct staff perspectives, the university, the school for the deaf and a high school receive site. Prospective participants searching for ways of providing programming for student and staff far from a rich campus resource will find this presentation illuminating.


Going the Distance to Meet the New York State Social Studies Standards (T130C)

Juhas, Sherri Email: sjuhas@eischools.org

Cleary Secondary Program

Corceran-Culhane, Judy - Cleary Secondary Program

Tuesday, June 26, 2001 — 1:30 PM

Location: LBJ [060] 3237

Type: Formal Audience: K-12

Strand: Online and Distance Education

In recent years, educators in New York State have been faced with two urgent challenges. The first, to revise and create curricula to meet New York State's new standards and assessments; the second, how to integrate technology into the curriculum. In response to these challenges, we have developed technology infused lessons to meet the social studies standards.

Using the Internet, teachers and students can access information from across the world. Through website visits, students can travel through time and space, visiting places in both ancient and modern times. Students gain both a historical and global perspective, learning about other cultures and global issues. The Internet is also an incredible resource for the examination of primary sources such as artifacts, photographs and documents. Videoconferencing allows students to take virtual field trips to distant museums and to interact with the museum curator and each other, while learning about items in the museum's collection.

Through a multimedia presentation, we will present a variety of lessons and activities developed for deaf high school students that incorporate the Internet and videoconferencing visits to Ancient Egypt and Colonial America. While these lessons were developed to meet the social studies standards, the suggestions can be applied across all disciplines and grade levels.


Using Technology to Deliver a Distance Education Program to Interpreters Working in K-12 Settings: A Model of Collaboration Between the Deaf Community, State Education Agencies, and a Post-Secondary Institution (T130A)

Johnson, Ed.D, Leilani Email: lanijo@ix.netcom.com

FRCC @ Lowry Campus

Tuesday, June 26, 2001 — 1:30 PM

Location: LBJ [060] PANARA THEATRE

Type: Formal Audience: All

Strand: Using Technology to Support Learning

Results of a modified Educational Interpreter Performance Assessment (EIPA), used as a prescreening for entry into the Educational Interpreting Certificate Program (EICP), indicate that many educational interpreters do not possess the linguistic competence necessary to perform the tasks associated with interpreting in educational settings. Additionally, many educational interpreters who live in rural areas do not have access to an established, traditional program where formal training could be secured, and they typically work without the benefit of supervision by persons knowledgeable about the interpreting task. Additionally, the Deaf Community at large has expressed concerns about the quality of education received by deaf and hard-of-hearing children and youth in mainstream classrooms. This presentation will detail a creative and collaborative model of providing distance education to working educational interpreters with the goal of increasing their interpreting skills and the knowledge sets for application in the K-12 setting. The model demonstrates creative ways that technology can be used to connect working interpreters to deaf individuals serving as language mentors and provide guidance for how to effectively communicate with deaf and hard-of-hearing children.

Presentation Objectives:

1. Provide a description of the student population of the EICP by providing summary demographic data and the analysis of scores achieved on the modified EIPA assessment prescreening.

2. Describe a model of collaboration used to deliver distance coursework to working educational interpreters throughout ten states and BIA sponsored schools.

3. Describe the use of deaf individuals as language mentors during the first year of the program, as well as on-line and on-site instructors during other aspects of the three year program.

4. Describe the role of each stakeholder in the model of collaboration.

5. Describe the pre- and post- screening results of the student population in the Educational Interpreting Certificate Program (EICP) and the implication of the growth patterns for deaf and hard-of-hearing children and youth.


Strategies for Assessing the Impact of Technology in the Online and Distance Learning Teaching/Learning Process (T230D)

Ellsworth, Mary Email: Mary.Ellsworth@Gallaudet.edu

Model Secondary School for the Deaf

Huckleberry, Teresa - Indiana School for the Deaf

Tuesday, June 26, 2001 — 2:30 PM

Location: LBJ [060] 1510

Type: Formal Audience: K-12

Strand: Strategies for Assessing the Impact of Technology in Teaching/Learning Process

Project SOAR-High is a teacher produced online curriculum and collaborative environment for the instruction of a one-year course in Earth Systems Science (ESS). The four participating teachers come from 3 institutions: Model Secondary School for the Deaf, Indiana School for the Deaf, and University High School Deaf and Hard of Hearing Program. The teachers have explored the use of various student collaboration strategies, including the sharing of student projects on web pages, electronic portfolios of student work, TeamWave collaboration software, on-line discussions, email exchanges, and videoconferencing. Throughout the course all four teachers emphasize that students development and practice independent learning skills. Two documentation studies have been conducted on SOAR-High ESS. The first study looked at how the four teachers are using dynamic collaboration techniques to share strategies and curriculum development activities and generally engage in collegial inquiry. The study examined the electronic message stream between the teachers looking for exchange of ideas, shared decision making, and contributions of materials. A second study, in progress during the Spring of 2001, used four strategies to study the impact of the technologies used in SOAR-High on student learning. Two of the four strategies will be reported on in this presentation: the assessment of the online curriculum units for science process skills, and analysis of teacher logs for student development of independent learning skills.


New Accomplishments Using Voice Recognition for Captioning of Chemistry Videotapes Made During Regular F2F Courses (T230B)

Paine, Robert Email: RHPSCH@rit.edu

Rochester Institute of Technology

Tuesday, June 26, 2001 — 2:30 PM

Location: LBJ [060] 2590

Type: Formal Audience: All

Strand: Using Technology to Support Learning

For the past nine years the Department of Chemistry, College of Science, Rochester Institute of Technology, Rochester, NY has offered distance learning (DL) courses in Chemistry as fundamental instruction for students in many college disciplines (engineering, information technology, environmental management, et.al). These courses use videotapes produced in a live class room situation (face-to-face: F2F). For hearing impaired students, it is imperative that these tapes be captioned. To post-caption tapes is tedious, time consuming and expensive. For the past five years the author and colleagues have been doing research in the use of existing voice-recognition technology and systems to provide instantaneous captioning of the aforementioned videotapes. Working under a grant from the Camille and Henry Dreyfus Foundation, Inc. (Dedicated to the advancement of the Chemical Sciences), and using Informational Technology students as members of the research groups, this project has reached a level of successful application, such that the proprietary work is now listed under "patent pending." This presentation will describe the successes accomplished and problems remaining, as well as future development plans.


 

Technology in Education Can Empower Deaf Students - A Teacher Training Initiative (T230C)

Mackall, Phil Email: phil.mackall@gallaudet.edu

Laurent Clerc National Deaf Education Center

Tuesday, June 26, 2001 — 2:30 PM

Location: LBJ [060] 3237

Type: Formal Audience: K-12

Strand: Using Technology to Support Learning

The Technology in Education Can Empower Deaf Students (TecEds) project was established to fill the gap between existing technology in the classroom and teacher and staff knowledge of how to use that technology effectively in the instructional setting. The focus of this effort is twofold: (1) teachers and staff in the Clerc Center and (2) teachers and staff around the nation. This presentation will briefly describe how the Clerc Center is providing the training and what changes we have seen. It will also show the online interactive tools developed by the Clerc Center to encourage sharing of strategies used by teachers and staff across the nation (and the world) to integrate technology into the educational process: an activities database, a software database, web resource libraries, and a discussion forum. The ultimate goal of the project: knowledgeable teachers and staff who can provide the necessary skills for our students to compete successfully in the work world. Web reference: http://clerccenter.gallaudet.edu/teceds/index.html


Accessible Online and Educational Media: Research, Development and Standards (T230A)

Freed, Geoff Email: geoff_freed@wgbh.org

CPB/WGBH National Center for Accessible Media

Goldberg, Larry - CPB/WGBH National Center for Accessible Media

Tuesday, June 26, 2001 — 2:30 PM

Location: LBJ [060] PANARA THEATRE

Type: Formal Audience: All

Strand: Online and Distance Education

The CPB/WGBH National Center for Accessible Media (NCAM) is pioneering the use of accessible media in the classroom through several projects. These activities will lead to the design of new access devices and procedures, educate software and hardware developers, and in general help assure that disabled students can reap the benefits of existing and emerging educational media.

1. Access to PIVoT Project

NCAM is collaborating with the Massachusetts Institute of Technology to make an on-line interactive physics course accessible to students with sensory disabilities. The project will test, implement, document and promote the development of multimedia access solutions and accessible Web site design.

2. Standards for Accessible Learning Technologies (SALT)

The SALT Partnership is a four-year initiative which involves partners from every facet of the distributed-learning industry. This project will develop and promote open-access specifications and support implementation models which enable people with disabilities to access distributed-learning resources.

3. Access to Rich Media Project

The Access to Rich Media Project develops and disseminates solutions relation to the accessibility of video, audio and other types of media. The project maintains a resource center with examples of accessible rich media, as well as links to a range of relevant resources. Under the Rich Media Project, NCAM is also developing version 2.0 of the Media Access Generator (MAGpie), a digital captioning and description application for the PC and Macintosh.


Digital Video Conferencing for Remote Tutoring/Teaching of Deaf Students (T330D)

Mallory, James Email: jrmnet@rit.edu

National Technical Institute for the Deaf

Laury, Dean - National Technical Institute for the Deaf

Tuesday, June 26, 2001 — 3:30 PM

Location: LBJ [060] 1510

Type: Formal Audience: All

Strand: Online and Distance Education

Faculty within the Center for Technical Studies at NTID have been using varied technologies for delivering and interacting with both on-campus and Distance (On-Line) Learning classes for the past six years. Some of the technologies used include electronic conferencing, VHS tape and web-streamed video, web based instruction with text and graphics, digital video conferencing, sample source code and executable programming examples. For the past two years we have collected data from deaf and hearing students who participated in C++ and Visual Basic programming classes both on-campus and via distance learning in order to better understand the relative effectiveness of these technologies from the perspective of the student. Responses to A student-centered questionnaire provided a rating of the overall importance of each course component for their overall learning. In this session we will present the Interactive technologies used to deliver the instructional material and the results of student ratings regarding their relative effectiveness for delivery of instruction for our students. These findings will be presented, followed by an interactive discussion with the audience regarding which delivery systems are best for which content areas and learners.


"Manguage" Class - Where Math and Language Meet (T330B)

Cooper, Susan Email: coopers@fsdb.k12.fl.us

Florida School for the Deaf and Blind

Clark, Sue - Florida School for the Deaf and Blind

Tuesday, June 26, 2001 — 3:30 PM

Location: LBJ [060] 2590

Type: Formal Audience: K-12

Strand: Using Technology to Support Learning

"Manguage" (Math and Language) class was originally created by Sue Clark (Math) and Susan Cooper (Language) to help their middle-school students at the Florida School for the Deaf learn to explain, in written form, the steps used to solve real-life math problems. They have developed several units integrating math and language arts skills. In "Manguage" class, students are given teacher-created mathematical challenges from units on high-interest, real-life topics. They learn to gather data using the internet and a variety of printed materials, to organize their information using graphic organizers (both on the computer and on paper), to graph and chart their results using graphing software and then to describe the steps of the process in an organized, clear description. Students then explain and present their compiled information in a multimedia presentation.

The primary objective of combining these two classes is to enable students to achieve higher success rates on the Florida Comprehensive Assessment Test (FCAT), Mathematics. The format is easily modified to fit the needs of students and to incorporate targeted skills. Both Math and Language benchmarks from the Sunshine State Standards are targeted, along with a variety of research and technology skills.


Assessing Technology Intervention: Results from the TecEds Project (T330C)

Pongor, Kathy Email: Kathy.Pongor@gallaudet.edu

Laurent Clerc National Deaf Education Center

Tuesday, June 26, 2001 — 3:30 PM

Location: LBJ [060] 3237

Type: Formal Audience: K-12

Strand: Strategies for Assessing the Impact of Technology in Teaching/Learning Process

This presentation will examine the implementation and results from the TecEds Project "Technology in Education Can Empower Deaf Students" (TecEds). The aim of the project and the Center is to train teachers to incorporate more technological, visual learning into the education of deaf and hard of hearing students. One teacher or staff person from each Clerc Center academic team was selected as a technology leader (TecEds rep) for their team. The TecEds reps serve as liaisons with their teams by carrying back new ideas to their fellow teachers. During the summer months, a larger group of teachers from the Clerc Center and from the nation will participate in an in-depth, one-week training course. As a result of the training and support to teachers, deaf and hard of hearing students will experience technology as a vital tool for learning and communication, develop group and team skills, and use different types of learning and processing skills. Results from the first year of training, encompassing the formal TecEds training sessions and mini-sessions will be presented.


Washington State's Shared Reading Video Outreach Project: Learning Via Interactive Videoconferencing (T330A)

Seago, Howie Email: hseago@psesd.wednet.edu

Washington Sensory Disabilities Services

Tuesday, June 26, 2001 — 3:30 PM

Location: LBJ [060] PANARA THEATRE

Type: Formal Audience: K-12

Strand: Online and Distance Education

Three years ago in Washington State we launched the "Shared Reading Video Outreach Project," adapting for distance delivery the Shared Reading Project model developed at the Clerc Center (Gallaudet University). Our goal is to enhance reading skills of isolated deaf children living in rural areas, taking advantage of a new statewide telecommunications network. Using live interactive videoconferencing, skilled Deaf instructors provide training in reading strategies to educators and family members, as well as direct services to the deaf children themselves. We are currently serving 138 deaf children ages 3-13, their educators, hearing peers, and families at 19 sites throughout the state. This presentation will describe the nuts and bolts of operating SRVOP including descriptions of various project components such as storybook reading sessions with children, training sessions with educators and family members, initial experiences with individualized tutoring sessions, a brief summary of lessons learned, and initial evaluation results.


Virtual High School: on-line electives for a small student body. There is power behind choices. (W10D)

Rust, Mark Email: rustma@msd.edu

Maryland School for the Deaf (Frederick)

Wednesday, June 27, 2001 — 10:00 AM

Location: LBJ [060] 1510

Type: Formal Audience: K-12

Strand: Using Technology to Support Learning

Virtual High School (VHS) began five years ago with a Federal grant from the Department of Education. This innovative on-line distance learning provides over 140 elective courses. Students at the Maryland school for the Deaf (Frederick) have been involved with VHS for the past two years and have gained tremendous skills. VHS has equalized the educational playing field for our students actively engaging the students with challenging material and academic discussion without the hassles of going through an interpreter and awkward moments of silence. Is VHS for you? With the Federal grant completing its five-year-term, VHS is switching to a pay-per-use basis. What does this mean to the school site? What does VHS have to offer? What standards are employed in establishing an on-line community? This presentation will examine the composition of courses offered through VHS and how it allows for a maximized learning environment for our deaf students.


Virtual Classroom: Web-Based Remote Teaching & Small-Group Tutoring in Real Time (W10B)

Ting, Simon Email: sktnmp@rit.edu

National Technical Institute for the Deaf

Pitoniak, Jason - National Technical Institute for the Deaf

Clarke, Cathy - National Technical Institute for the Deaf

Wednesday, June 27, 2001 — 10:00 AM

Location: LBJ [060] 2590

Type: Formal Audience: All

Strand: Online and Distance Education

Distance learning is the Holy Grail of higher education today. In particular, synchronous distance learning, with its goal of allowing an instructor to teach a group of remote learners in real-time, is on the cutting edge of instructional technology. The presenters will describe Virtual Classroom, a client-server application that they created to support real-time classroom teaching and small-group tutoring on the Web. The presenters will discuss problems that stand in the way of making remote classroom teaching and small-group tutoring a reality. They will describe how they implemented a solution that takes advantage of the Internet and Web-based communications protocols and standards to turn ordinary desktop PCs into a client-server platform for remote teaching and learning under real-time conditions. They will discuss difficulties they had to overcome, in particular the problem of Internet bandwidth bottlenecks, in order to enable instructor and learners to communicate and share information and files in real-time. The highlight of the presentation will be a demonstration of how Virtual Classroom enables instructors to combine Web-based instructional techniques with real-time communications and peer-to-peer file sharing to deliver instruction to a group of remote learners from the instructor's desktop PC. The presenters will also outline their plans to disseminate beta versions of Virtual Classroom for field-testing.


 

Use of Multimedia and Computer Networks to Facilitate Educational Collaboration for Deaf Students at Tsukuba College of Technology, Japan (W10C)

Araki, Tsutomu Email: araki@a.tsukuba-tech.ac.jp

Tsukuba College of Technology

Wednesday, June 27, 2001 — 10:00 AM

Location: LBJ [060] 3237

Type: Formal Audience: All

Strand: Using Technology to Support Learning

Tsukuba College of Technology (TCT) is one of a few technical universities in the world that teaches hearing-impaired students. The use of visual elements and displays are often used as an important component of curriculum design and presentation.

At TCT, the fundamentals of mechanical drawing methods and engineering design principles are studied through the use of Computer Aided Design (CAD) devices and drawing machines. Using CAD technologies, student drawings and designs are enhanced, with the student recognizing the benefits of using technologies to support creative tasks. TCT has experimented with the use of the WWW as a means for offering these CAD courses to other schools for the deaf in Japan. It is hoped that these experiments will result in more deaf students becoming interested in studying engineering.

This presentation will review some of the Web based instructional materials used to teach CAD at TCT and will show examples of student produced CAD and mechanical drawings. Additionally the benefits and challenges of using the Web for distance education in Japan will be discussed. Handouts.


Project Access: Use of Computer Technology at Hungarian Schools for the Deaf (W10A)

To continue in presentation W11A

Nash, Kenneth Email: krnnis@rit.edu

National Technical Institute for the Deaf

Biro, Szuzsa - Kaposvar School for the Deaf

Bolvai, Ferenc - Budapest School for the Hard of Hearing

Horvath, Erzebet - Sopron School for the Deaf

Tahy, Szuzsa - Hungarian Association of Teachers of Informatics

Wednesday, June 27, 2001 — 10:00 AM

Location: LBJ [060] PANARA THEATRE

Type: Formal Audience: All

Strand: Using Technology to Support Learning

Project Access is an American-Hungarian strategy to bring Hungarian deaf pupils into the age of Information Technology and create the first-ever Information Technology curriculum for deaf students in Central and Eastern Europe. The project is fostering the development of information technology skills among deaf pupils - youngsters who have long been denied full access to the same information as their peers who hear.

Project Access provides Hungarian teachers and administrators with training regarding the application of Instructional Technology in deaf education. Hungarian educators, working with US colleagues, are creating an industry-oriented curriculum that is adapted to the learning style of deaf students. Each project-supported school has established and equipped a state-of-the-art computer laboratory that is being widely utilized by pupils. The eight Hungarian are linking to the Internet, creating their own web sites, and participate in ongoing workshops conducted by Hungarian and American specialists in IT and deaf education.

The presenters will review the development, design, implementation and results of their individual school-based projects as part of this important, international program.

Project Access WWW Site: http://www.rit.edu/~624www/access/


NTID's Instructional Technology Consortium (W11D)

Clymer, E. William Email: ewcncp@rit.edu

National Technical Institute for the Deaf

MacKenzie, Doug - National Technical Institute for the Deaf

Monikowski, Christine - National Technical Institute for the Deaf

Porter, Jeff - National Technical Institute for the Deaf

Wednesday, June 27, 2001 — 11:00 AM

Location: LBJ [060] 1510

Type: Formal Audience: All

Strand: Using Technology to Support Learning

The NTID Instructional Technology Consortium (ITC) is a collaborative, faculty-driven initiative for enhancing teaching and learning with deaf and hard of hearing students through the use of technology and related innovative teaching strategies. The ITC provides initial instruction and ongoing support for pedagogy and instructional technology at NTID. The primary goal of the ITC is to improve student learning and the practice of teaching by putting new instructional tools directly into the hands of instructional faculty for application in the teaching/learning process.

The ITC generally offers several different topic strands (WWW Development, Preparation of Visual Materials and Online Learning Technologies) during each week long Studio. Teachers select a strand and come to workshops with a project in mind and with necessary perquisite skills. These Studios, facilitated by other NTID teachers, offered demonstrations and hands-on opportunities for teachers to refine their skills and work on their projects. By June 2000, 181 faculty completed 22 "Teacher Studios".

This presentation will review the structure of the ITC Studios; describe the nature of teacher projects, and the results of faculty evaluations of training sessions. More significantly will be a discussion of the results of a 2001 survey given to all faculty who participated in ITC Studios. This survey attempted to obtain faculty opinion regarding the significance of instructional technology and the teaching/learning process.

Instructional Technology Consortium WWW: http://www.rit.edu/~ntiditc


Assistive Technology and Learning: It Works AND It's the Law (W11B)

Sorkin, Donna Email: dsorkin@agbell.org

Alexander Graham Bell Association

Youdelman, Karen - Cuyahoga County Board of Education/Mayfield City School District

Wednesday, June 27, 2001 — 11:00 AM

Location: LBJ [060] 2590

Type: Formal Audience: All

Strand: Strategies for Assessing the Impact of Technology in Teaching/Learning Process

As part of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA), school districts are required to consider the assistive technology (AT) needs of all students with individualized educational programs (IEPs). Further, AT evaluation, devices, and services must be provided as determined by the IEP team.

There are many technologies relevant to deaf and hard of hearing students, for example, captioners, computer programs, the Smart Board (interactive whiteboard), TTYs, Web sites, videotapes, interactive networks, and FM amplification systems. When used appropriately, the enhanced auditory and visual capabilities of these technologies have direct instructional value for students with hearing impairments. The key, however, is to avoid the "technology imperative," which is the inclusion of technology just because it exists. Technology is a tool. Its effectiveness in the teaching/learning process lies in the hands of the person using the technology.

This presentation will address (a) the legal/rights issues (IDEA, Sec. 508 and ADA) surrounding technology use, and (b) the factors to consider when integrating technology into school programs for children with hearing impairments (e.g., types and reliability of hardware, choosing software, motivation versus entertainment, training, technical support, and limitations).


Realtime Remote Online Captioning: An Effective Accommodation for Rural Schools and Colleges (W11C)

Fifield, Bryce Email: fifield@farside.cc.misu.nodak.edu

North Dakota Center for Persons with Disabilities

Wednesday, June 27, 2001 — 11:00 AM

Location: LBJ [060] 3237

Type: Formal Audience: All

Strand: Using Technology to Support Learning

The Remote Realtime Online Captioning project of the North Dakota Center for Persons with Disabilities at Minot State University has developed a system that makes captioning services available via the Internet. This system is capable of delivering both verbatim and note taking captioning services on demand to a variety of settings including classrooms in secondary schools, colleges, and university campuses. It is a useful and cost-effective strategy for settings where full time sign interpreting or captioning is not available. The system encodes audio from the classroom, transmits it to a captionist who transcribes it, and returns the text to the classroom. Data suggest that students using the system have better retention and participation than when no accommodation is made. Students in some settings express a preference for the captioning over more conventional signed interpreting. The system has had successful implementations in middle school, high school, and college classrooms. We have also used it for consumer accommodations in workshops, conferences, board meetings, and individual advising situations.


Project Access: Use of Computer Technology at Hungarian Schools for the Deaf (W11A)

A contiuation of presentation W10A

Nash, Kenneth Email: krnnis@rit.edu

National Technical Institute for the Deaf

Biro, Szuzsa - Kaposvar School for the Deaf

Bolvai, Ferenc - Budapest School for the Hard of Hearing

Horvath, Erzebet - Sopron School for the Deaf

Tahy, Szuzsa - Hungarian Association of Teachers of Informatics

Wednesday, June 27, 2001 — 11:00 AM

Location: LBJ [060] PANARA THEATRE

Type: Formal Audience: All

Strand: Using Technology to Support Learning

Project Access is an American-Hungarian strategy to bring Hungarian deaf pupils into the age of Information Technology and create the first-ever Information Technology curriculum for deaf students in Central and Eastern Europe. The project is fostering the development of information technology skills among deaf pupils - youngsters who have long been denied full access to the same information as their peers who hear.

Project Access provides Hungarian teachers and administrators with training regarding the application of Instructional Technology in deaf education. Hungarian educators, working with US colleagues, are creating an industry-oriented curriculum that is adapted to the learning style of deaf students. Each project-supported school has established and equipped a state-of-the-art computer laboratory that is being widely utilized by pupils. The eight Hungarian are linking to the Internet, creating their own web sites, and participate in ongoing workshops conducted by Hungarian and American specialists in IT and deaf education.

The presenters will review the development, design, implementation and results of their individual school-based projects as part of this important, international program.

Project Access WWW Site: http://www.rit.edu/~624www/access/

 


Presentations Listed by Strand

 

Online and Distance Education

A Redesign of Deaf Education Teacher Preparation Through Technological Innovations and Collaborative Activities (M10B)

Popular Electronic Conferencing Use and Comparison (M11D)

Gallaudet Online Learning Solutions: Portals, Course Tools, and Implementation (M11B)

A Study of Current Models of Online Learning for Deaf Learners (M130C)

Online Learning: A Learning Medium for Everyone (M130A)

IdeaTools: Rapid Development Tools for Creating Interactive Multimedia - Enabled Courses on the Web (M230B)

Adequate Testing and Evaluation of On-Line Learners (M230A)

Web-based Curriculum Development for the Social Sciences (M330B)

Web-Based Curriculum Development for Chemistry and Biochemistry Using IdeaTools (M12P)

A Web-Based Initiative to Infuse English Across the Curriculum for Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing Students (T4P)

What's Worthwhile on the Web (T6P)

The Write Technology (T1P)

Implementing Video Streamed Instruction for Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing Online Learners (T11C)

PEPNet Online Training for Students Who are Deaf or Hard of Hearing: Preparing for College Success (T11A)

Developing a Successful A-Team for Teaching ASL on a Broadband Network (T130B)

Going the Distance to Meet the New York State Social Studies Standards (T130C)

Accessible Online and Educational Media: Research, Development and Standards (T230A)

Digital Video Conferencing for Remote Tutoring/Teaching of Deaf Students (T330D)

Washington State's Shared Reading Video Outreach Project: Learning Via Interactive Videoconferencing (T330A)

Virtual Classroom: Web-Based Remote Teaching & Small-Group Tutoring in Real Time (W10B)

 

 

Transition to Workplace

Exploring Career Opportunities Using Technology (M130D)

Using Electronic Portfolio to Demonstrate Academic and Pedagogic Competencies (M11P)

 

Strategies for Assessing the Impact of Technology in Teaching/Learning Process

Shared Texts, Negotiated Meanings: Perspectives on the Computer Mediated Communication of Postsecondary Students Who are Deaf (M330C)

A Web-Supported Course for Deaf College-Aged Students (M4P)

Clearinghouse On Mathematics, Engineering, Technology, and Science (COMETS): A Web-based Resource for Inservice and Preservice Teacher Education (M9P)

Strategies for Assessing the Impact of Technology in the Online and Distance Learning Teaching/Learning Process (T230D)

Assessing Technology Intervention: Results from the TecEds Project (T330C)

Assistive Technology and Learning: It Works AND It's the Law (W11B)

 

Using Technology to Support Learning

PROJECT SOLVE: Web-based Guided Practice to Improve Math Word Problem Solving (M10C)

The Design and Use of a Language Facility for the Instruction of Sign Language Interpreters (M10E)

Distance Learning Pilot: Physics and Mathematics (M10A)

Integrating Technology into Literacy: Digital Video Dictionary (M11C)

Distance Learning Pilot: Physics and Mathematics (M11A)

Project Inclusion (M130B)

Technology Used to Support Sign and Spoken Language Development (M130E)

Cornerstones Approach to Literacy Development (M230D)

Using C-Print to Support Learning in Secondary and Postsecondary Settings (M230C)

Innovative Technologies Applied in an Integrated-Curriculum Unit (M330D)

Integrating Your Social Studies Lesson Plans Using Technology in the Classroom (M330A)

Learning Geography via Virtual Travel (M14P)

Use of Graphic Design Principles to Enhance the Learning Process (M3P)

Postsecondary Education Network International Project (M10P)

The Intellikeys Alternative Keyboard Solution (M6P)

How are Teachers for the Deaf Using the Internet to Educate K-12 Deaf and Hard of Hearing students? (M5P)

Supporting ASL Learning through Interactive CD ROM Technology (M7P)

Using HyperStudio to Enhance Language and Reading Instruction (M1P)

Microsoft Office ASL Project: An Interactive Resource for Teaching Deaf Students Technical Information (M2P)

Captioned Media Program (M8P)

Virtual Reality Education for Assisted Learning (VREAL) (T15P)

Video Communication System (T2P)

Demonstration of MAGpie 2.0 Software for Creating Captions and Audio Descriptions (T5P)

Creating Age-Appropriate Instructional Materials for Deaf Students with Minimal Language Skills (T7P)

ACCESS: Applying Computers Creatively to Enhance Student Skills (T9P)

American Sign Language Dictionary and Inflection Guide (T12P)

Bring Your Camera on the Road to New York State Standards (T8P)

Social Studies and the Internet (T10P)

Deaf President Now Interactive (T13P)

Online Bookclubs Using Free Internet E-Boards (T3P)

Technology to Support Visually-Impaired Deaf & Hard-of-Hearing Students (T10D)

CART in the Classroom: How to Make Realtime Captioning Work for You (T10B)

Two Streams of Captions for Children's Television (T10C)

NTID's Educational Technology Resource Room: A Supportive Environment for Acquisition and Application of Instructional Technologies (T10E)

Impact of SMART Boards on Learning Instruction (T10A)

NTID Learning Consortium (T11E)

Innovative ways of using ICT (Information & Communication Technology) to improve literacy and communication skills for deaf learners (T11B)

NTID's High Technology Center: A model of a centralized, industry funded, cross curricular, multipurpose graphic media and publishing facility (T130E)

Using Technology to Deliver a Distance Education Program to Interpreters Working in K-12 Settings: A Model of Collaboration Between the Deaf Community, State Education Agencies, and a Post-Secondary Institution (T130A) *

New Accomplishments Using Voice Recognition for Captioning of Chemistry Videotapes Made During Regular F2F Courses (T230B)

Technology in Education Can Empower Deaf Students - A Teacher Training Initiative (T230C)

Manguage" Class - Where Math and Language Meet (T330B)

Virtual High School: on-line electives for a small student body. There is power behind choices. (W10D)

Use of Multimedia and Computer Networks to Facilitate Educational Collaboration for Deaf Students at Tsukuba College of Technology, Japan (W10C)

Project Access: Use of Computer Technology at Hungarian Schools for the Deaf (W10A)

NTID's Instructional Technology Consortium (W11D)

Realtime Remote Online Captioning: An Effective Accommodation for Rural Schools and Colleges (W11C)

Project Access: Use of Computer Technology at Hungarian Schools for the Deaf (W11A)