Instructional Technology

& Education of the Deaf

Supporting Learners, K — College

An International Symposium

 

 

National Technical Institute for the Deaf

Rochester, NY

June 25-29, 2001

 

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COMMITTEES

ADVISORY COMMITTEE

E. William Clymer, Coordinator
John Albertini
Robert Baker
Robert Brewer
Steve Campbell
Charles Johnstone
Fred Koch, RSD
Christine Monikowski
Doney Oatman
Jeffrey Porter
Karren Warren, ASD
Marsha Young

ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT

Aimee Breinholt

PROGRAM COMMITTEE

John Albertini, Chair
Camille Aidala
Ken Finton
Fred Dowaliby
Jerry Berent
Nora Shannon
John Sweeney
Frank Caccamise
Dean Lauria
Carla Bonaldi, RSD
Idalia Vazquez-Roland
Jeffrey Porter
Ronald Kelly
Patricia Billies
Allen Ford

COMPUTER SUPPORT COMMITTEE

Steve Campbell, Chair
Reid Blondell
Mike Burns
Gail Gabriel
Rick Rizzo
Rocco Saccente

LOCAL ARRANGEMENT COMMITTEE

Robert Baker, Chair
El Kaigler
Lin Hoke
Andrew Malcolm
Liz O’Brien

TECHNICAL SUPPORT COMMITTEE

Charles Johnstone, Chair
Bob Brewer
Steve Campbell
Doug MacKenzie
Pete Reeb
Bary Siegel

ONLINE

Christine Monikowski, Chair
Melinda Failing
Donna Lange
J. Matt Searls
Karren Warren, ASD

COMMUNICATION SERVICES COMMITTEE

Doney Oatman, Chair

WORKSHOP COMMITTEE

Marsha Young, Chair
Kathleen Crandall
David Hazelwood
Jonathan Millis
Rhonda Parrish, RSD

 

Instructional Technology and Education of the Deaf

Supporting Learners, K-College

An International Symposium

 

 

 

June 25-29, 2001

 

 

 

 

 

 

Support

U.S. Department of Education

Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services (OSERS)

National Technical Institute for the Deaf (NTID)

 

Co-Sponsors

American School for the Deaf (ASD)

The Northeast Technical Assistance Center (NETAC)

Rochester School for the Deaf (RSD)

Donations

DELL Computer Corporation

Apple Computer, Inc.

 

Hosted by the

National Technical Institute for the Deaf

A College of Rochester Institute of Technology

52 Lomb Memorial Drive

Rochester, NY 14623

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TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

WELCOME

SYMPOSIUM WEB SITE

USING THE PROGRAM

LOCATIONS OF PRESENTATIONS AND OTHER EVENTS

NTID LEARNING CENTER

SIGN LANGUAGE INTERPRETING AND OTHER COMMUNICATION SERVICES

RECOMMENDATION REPORT

PROCEEDINGS

ONLINE RESOURCES

POST CONFERENCE WORKSHOPS

GENERAL INFORMATION

SCHEDULE

PLENARY SPEAKERS AND SESSIONS

CONCURRENT SESSIONS

WORKSHOPS

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

HOST INSTITUTION

 

 

WELCOME

The National Technical Institute for the Deaf, a college of Rochester Institute of Technology (RIT), welcomes you to the International Symposium on Instructional Technology and Education of the Deaf.

The Symposium is intended to disseminate information and foster skills relative to current innovation and future developments in the use of instructional technology and educational media to support the teaching/learning process for deaf and hard-of-hearing students. It provides a forum for the presentation of current state-of-the-art practice and research for educators of the deaf in K-12 and postsecondary settings. It also provides a series of "hands-on" skill development workshops in a variety of instructional technology applications.

The objectives of this conference are to:

To accomplish these objectives, presentations will focus on practical applications of technology and feature new developments and innovative applications of enduring technologies. A cross section of teachers, media/library/technical staff members, and administrators serving deaf people in educational and community programs will share ideas through formal presentations and poster sessions. Prominent experts in the fields of instructional technology as well as educators of deaf people will provide new insights into future applications of technology. Experienced educators will also facilitate skill development workshops in applying a diverse array of instructional technologies to support deaf and hard-of-hearing learners.

 

The symposium program has been organized around four major topics:

 

Plenary, formal, and poster presentations have been selected from each of the four program topics.

One of the goals of the symposium is to collect ideas and recommendations from participants regarding future opportunities and challenges for applying instructional technology within education of the deaf. You will find a "Recommendations Input Form" with your program materials. Please take the time to note your ideas on this sheet and return it to the registration/information desk before the end of the day on Tuesday for your ideas to be included in the summary discussion scheduled for Wednesday afternoon at 1:30 p.m. Feel free to complete as many recommendation sheets as you deem necessary. You can also submit electronic versions of the Recommendation Forms via the Symposium Web Site.

Our goal is to make your stay enjoyable and productive, whether you are a participant or presenter. It is this assembly of people sharing their thoughts and knowledge on a national and international level that will make the Symposium a truly worthwhile event. Welcome to Rochester, to RIT/NTID, and to the "Instructional Technology/Education of the Deaf Symposium."


Dr. Robert R. Davila

RIT Vice President for NTID

SYMPOSIUM WEB SITE

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All Symposium information can be found at the Symposium Web Site. From the Web Site you will be able to:

 

All Symposium participants can access the Symposium Web Site by using the computers in the NTID Learning Center, located on the second floor at the top of the central stairs from the NTID Street area.

USING THE PROGRAM

In order to make the best use of your time, you are encouraged to use this program to plan a daily schedule before the start of the Symposium. This guide contains a complete listing of plenary, concurrent, and poster sessions, including the names of presenters, dates of presentations, times, and locations. Abstracts describing all the formal and poster presentations may be found in your Abstract Booklet and on the Symposium Web Site.

Any changes or additions to the schedule found in the program will be posted on the Symposium Web Site and on the message board next to the Registration/ Information desk.

 

 

LOCATIONS OF PRESENTATIONS

AND OTHER EVENTS

 

Plenary, Concurrent and Poster Sessions

The opening and closing ceremonies and the plenary sessions will take place in the NTID Panara Theatre.

Concurrent sessions will take place in rooms 1510, 2590, 3237, and Panara Theatre of the LBJ Building unless otherwise specified. 1510, 2590 and 3237 have seating capacity of approximately 55 people; the Panara Theater can accommodate 400 individuals. We have scheduled "overflow rooms" adjacent to the primary rooms, where participants will be able to view large television or projected television and sound from the main presentation room. If a presentation room fills to capacity, the Facilitator will announce the overflow room and its limitations regarding interpreter support and will ask for volunteers to quickly move to the overflow room. All poster sessions will be held in the LBJ Building Street area.

Morning Coffee

Coffee and breads will be provided Monday and Wednesday morning. Tuesday morning, from 8:30 to 10 a.m. in the LBJ Street area there will be a breakfast reception sponsored by the American School for the Deaf. This will occur at the same time as the Tuesday morning Poster Sessions. Get a bite to eat, browse, and enjoy the Posters!

Lunches

All registered participants will receive lunch coupons worth up to $6 that can be used at the NTID Dining Commons on Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday of the Symposium. The NTID Dinning Commons will offer a wide variety of cafeteria- style lunch choices from 11:30 a.m. until 1:30 p.m. each day. Sandwiches, coffee and snacks are available from 8:30-6 p.m. Participants are responsible for any costs above $6 at each lunch.

Receptions

NTID will host an hors d’oeuvres reception, for all Symposium participants in the LBJ Street Area from 5-7 p.m. on Monday, June 25th .

The American School for the Deaf will host a breakfast reception on Tuesday morning, June 26th from 8:30-10 a.m. in the NTID Street area.

Rochester School for the Deaf will host a wine and cheese reception at the school's Learning Resource Center on Tuesday, June 26th from 5 to 7 p.m. as a part of the Instructional Technology Symposium. There will be a special presentation by several RSD students describing and demonstrating their ROBOTICS project that they worked on in their Math course. There will also be an opportunity to hear about the ways RSD has integrated the use of technology into their programs and to see RSD's Elementary Science Lab (with Smart Board), their new T.V. production studio, and one of the school's computer labs. Buses will be used to transport participants to and from RSD. Check at the Registration/Information desk for details. Buses will depart NTID promptly at 4:30 p.m. Return buses will depart RSD at 7 p.m.

 

NTID Learning Center

Technology Resource Room for Participants

The NTID Learning Center (NLC) Lab, LBJ 2450, will be available as a technology resource room for all Symposium participants. The room is equipped with 32 Apple Macintosh and 32 PC computers. The NLC will be open from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. everyday of the Symposium for your use. These computers can be used to check the Symposium Web Site, schedule, enter feedback for presenters, check your email or access the Internet.

Service for Presenters

Room 1, within the NLC, is available for presenters to familiarize themselves with the hardware that will be used in the concurrent session rooms. The exact computer configuration and projection system will be available for practice.

Presenters who need assistance with handouts, PowerPoint presentations or other simple presentation or poster session needs should visit the Media Services Window (directly across the stairs from the NLC) to call x5-6015.

 

 SIGN LANGUAGE INTERPRETING AND

OTHER COMMUNICATION SERVICES

The following interpreting and communication services will be provided:

 

Please report any problems with Assistive Listening Devices to the Media Service Window area, LBJ-2525.

Cell phone users are asked to refrain from using their equipment during Symposium sessions.

 

RECOMMENDATION REPORT

One of the primary goals of the Symposium is to generate an instructional technology Recommendation Report to governmental, educational, commercial and non-profit organizations serving deaf and hard-of-hearing students. The issues identified by this process will also guide the planning of future Instructional Technology Symposia. The Report will contain the collective recommendations contributed by symposium participants and summarized at the closing session of the Symposium on June 27, 2001.

During the Symposium, three participants, representing the perspectives of "post-secondary," "K-12 education" and "instructional technology," have been asked to attend as many diverse sessions as possible and keep track of their impressions (through the eyes of their respective specialties).

At the "Recommendations" session, scheduled for 1:30 p.m. in Panara Theater on Wednesday, June 27, 2001, Dr. Jeffrey Porter will ask each of these individuals to provide a brief overview of their impressions as to the most significant challenges and opportunities facing the application of instructional technology in support of deaf and hard-of-hearing learners. After these three reviews are complete, there will be an open discussion of the issues, with the goal of providing direction for the final form and substance of the Recommendations Report. Dr. Porter will then summarize the significant issues addressed during this discussion and the resultant general themes likely to characterize the Recommendation Report.

We invite you to add your views and insights to this discussion by completing a Recommendation Input Form. You may submit as many Forms as you wish. However, for your comments to be included in the summary of recommendations session at the Symposium, you must submit them by Tuesday, June 26, 2001

at 4 p.m. You can submit a paper version of the form to the Registration/ Information desk or complete the form online at ../. Additional comments will be included in the final report, if submitted by July 14, 2001.

The areas of interest for the Recommendation Report are:

 

PROCEEDINGS

All presenters have been asked to submit a paper that will be available on the World Wide Web. In addition, the verbatim text captioning from each presentation will be posted on the web.

The Symposium organizers have decided not to make arrangements with publishers for a traditional, journal based "proceedings". Instead we are leaving such publication possibilities to individual presenters and journal editors. Presenters are free to discuss publication of a paper, based on the topic they presented at the symposium, with any publisher they choose.

ONLINE RESOURCES

At the conclusion of the Symposium, the papers submitted by each presenter will be added to the Symposium Web Site. These papers will provide a permanent record of the information addressed during presentations or poster sessions. As an additional resource, a verbatim text file generated by the Real-Time Graphic Display (RTGD) service from each session will be posted on the Symposium website.

We plan to use several distance learning activities as a means of bringing information presented at the Symposium to those who are not able to travel to Rochester. After the Symposium, an evaluation of the success of the distance learning efforts will be conducted to determine if such applications should be used in future meetings. We welcome your comments and suggestions.

 

Selected presentations will be simultaneously sent to a group at the American School for the Deaf via ISDN video conference technology. If a presentation is to be disseminated in this manner, it will not have any impact on the presentation format.

 

A Web Cam, originating from the NTID LBJ Building Street area, will show images (no sound or captions) of the poster session and reception area, for those who wish to see what is happening "live" at the Symposium.

 

POST CONFERENCE WORKSHOPS

A total of 8, full-day, hands-on Technology "Teacher Studio" Workshops will be offered on June 28 and 29, 2001. They will be taught by NTID faculty/staff or by K-12 partners from co- sponsoring schools and supported by NTID Faculty and Professional Staff. See page 28 for a complete listing of these workshops.

 

GENERAL INFORMATION

Registration/Information Desk

The Registration/Information Desk will be open:

Message Board

The message board, located near the Registration/Information desk, is available for participants to post and exchange messages. Since no paging system will be available during the Symposium, please check the message board regularly. For those trying to contact Symposium participants, they can call (716) 475-6867 between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m. and leave a message, which will then be posted on the message board.

 

Lost and Found

Please report items lost or found during the Symposium to the Registration/ Information desk.

Admission to Symposium Events

Admission to all plenary sessions, formal presentations, poster sessions, and other Symposium activities is open only to those wearing valid registration badges.

 

 

 

SCHEDULE

Monday, JUNE 25

7 - 8:15 a.m.

Registration

Coffee


8:15 - 9 a.m.

Opening Ceremony

E. William Clymer, Symposium Coordinator

Dr. T. Alan Hurwitz, Dean and Professor, NTID

Dr. Robert R. Davila, RIT Vice President for NTID

Russell M. Bessette, M.D., Executive Director NYSTAR (New York State Office of Science, Technology & Academic Research)

Ramon Rodriguez, OSERS, US Department of Education


9 - 9:45 a.m.

Plenary Session 1

Dr. Donald P. Ely


10 - 10:45 a.m.

Concurrent Session I


11 - 11:45 a.m.

Concurrent Session II


12 - 1:30 p.m.

Lunch

NTID Dining Commons


1:30 - 2:15 p.m.

Concurrent Session III


2:30 - 3:15 p.m.

Concurrent Session IV


3:30 - 4:15 p.m.

Concurrent Session V


4:30 - 6:00 p.m.

Poster Session I


5:00 - 7:00 p.m.


NTID Reception

TUESDAY, JUNE 26

8:30 - 10 a.m.

American School for the Deaf Reception/Breakfast &

Poster Session II


10 - 10:45 a.m.

Concurrent Session VI


11 - 11:45 a.m.

Concurrent Session VII


12 - 1:30 p.m.

Lunch

NTID Dining Commons


1:30 - 2:15 p.m.

Concurrent Session VIII


2:30 - 3:15 p.m.

Concurrent Session IX


3:30 - 4:15 p.m.

Concurrent Session X


5:30 - 7 p.m.

Rochester School for the Deaf Reception

Buses depart Radisson Hotel and NTID at 5:00 p.m. Buses will return from RSD to the hotel at 7:00 p.m.


WEDNESDAY, JUNE 27

8 - 9 a.m.

Coffee


9 - 9:45 a.m.

Plenary Session II

Dr. Thomas E. Grayson


10 - 10:45 a. m.

Concurrent Session XI


11 - 11:45 a.m.

Concurrent Session XII


12 - 1:30 p.m.

Lunch

NTID Dining Commons


1:30 - 2:30 p.m.

Recommendation Discussion

Dr. Jeffery Porter, Interim Director, NTID CRTL

Francisco Abeyta, ASD

K-12 Deaf Education

Dr. T. Alan Hurwitz, NTID

Post-Secondary Deaf Education

Rhonda Parrish, RSD

Instructional Technology


2:30 - 3 p.m.

Closing

Dr. Robert R. Davila, RIT Vice President for NTID


PLENARY SPEAKERS AND SESSIONS

Monday, June 25, 2001

9- 9:45 a.m.

Facts and Fallacies About the Future of Technology in

Education of the Deaf

 

Donald P. Ely, Ph.D.

621 Skytop Road, Suite 160

Syracuse University

Syracuse, New York 13244-5290

(315) 443-3640 (voice)

(315) 443-5448 (fax)

Email: dely@ericir.syr.edu

Professor Emeritus and Founding Director, ERIC Clearinghouse on Information & Technology established the Doctoral Program for Educators of the Deaf at Syracuse University (1970-1977). He is currently a Visiting Professor at Florida State University, Nova Southeastern University and the University of Twente (The Netherlands). He served as Program Director for Dissemination at the National Science Foundation and on the Task Force to plan the National Library of Education. During his career at Syracuse University, he made major contributions to educational technology and distance education in Chile, Indonesia, The Netherlands and Peru. His recent publications include the International Encyclopedia of Educational Technology and Classic Writing on Instructional Technology.

Abstract

Disability rights laws in the United States have helped to remove barriers for people with disabilities. These laws are committed to full and equal access to educational opportunities for all. The removal of physical barriers has been a visible accomplishment but a new set of barriers related to technology, especially access to the Internet and World Wide Web, have created a digital divide that locks out many people on the basis of disability. We are especially concerned about deaf individuals who are affected by this digital divide.

This presentation is intended to be an advance organizer for people attending this Symposium. It highlights technology trends in terms of "facts" and "fallacies" that help or hinder progress in the use of technology for teaching and learning among deaf individuals and their mentors. The focus is on technology applications for students, teachers, resources, settings and learning outcomes. Signposts for each trend are discussed with suggestions for reducing the digital divide.

Wednesday, June 27, 2001

9 - 9:45 a.m.

Knowing and Understanding Transition: Its History, Barriers and Future

Thomas E. Grayson, Ph. D.

Assessment Program Coordinator

Office of the Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs

University of Illinois

414 Student Services Building

610 East John Street

Champaign, Illinois 61820

(217) 333-7336 (voice)

(217) 333-4084 (fax)

Email: tgrayson@uiuc.edu

As the Assessment Program Coordinator for the Office of the Vice Chancellor of Student Affairs at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Dr. Grayson provides evaluation consultation to Student Affairs Division Heads (e.g., housing, campus recreation, health services, Illinois Union, disability services, international student services, and so forth) on how to assess their programs and services. He is the recent past director of the National Transition Alliance for Youth with Disabilities (NTA). The Alliance membership included The Transition Research Institute at Illinois, The National Transition Network at Minnesota, The Academy for Educational Development, The Council of Chief State School Officers, National Alliance of Business, and National Association of State Directors of Special Education. The NTA was designed to identify proven practices, evaluate transition program effectiveness, provide technical assistance to OSERS Model Programs, School-to-Work Opportunities Systems, and State Change Grantees, and prepare and disseminate information to relevant audiences on how best to meet transition needs of youth with disabilities. Dr Grayson continues to provide consultation with many of these members on program planning and evaluation. In addition to his current responsibilities, he teaches a course on individual differences and exceptionalities likely to be found in regular elementary and secondary classrooms. The course covers the history of services for students with special needs and the legal basis for special education.

Abstract

The notion of change or transition is not new. However, the notion of transition services for individuals with disabilities is relatively recent (since the middle 1980s) and has been conceptualized as a "bridge to the future." This concept of "bridge" continues but the strategies for building bridges continues to evolve. There are some indications that transition services are becoming systemic. However, there are also indications that transition services are not fully recognized as being important and necessary for enabling youth with disabilities to move from secondary school to post-secondary schooling and/or to move into meaningful and gainful employment.

This presentation will focus on transition legislation, bridge building strategies, and transition issues of diversity, partnerships and entrepreneurial-ships, technology and sustainability. The history of transition, a look at what some experts are saying and doing, and the future of transition, including the role of technology will be addressed. In addition, examples of model demonstration projects that are using technology to plan, implement and assess their transition services will be highlighted.

 

CONCURRENT SESSIONS

   

M O N D A Y, J U NE 2 5

   

C o n c u r r e n t S e s s i o n I

10-10:45 a.m.

 

FORMAL PRESENTATIONS

LBJ-2590

 

A Redesign of Deaf Education Teacher Preparation Through Technological Innovations and Collaborative Activities

Harold Johnson

Kent State University; Kent, OH

Karen Kilda

Eastern Kentucky University; Richmond, KY

Donna Mertens

Gallaudet University; Washington D.C.

LBJ-3237

 

PROJECT SOLVE: Web-based Guided Practice to Improve Math Word Problem Solving

Ronald Kelly

Harry G. Lang

Keith Mousley

National Technical Institute for the Deaf; Rochester, NY

LBJ-3615

 

The Design and Use of a Language Facility for the Instruction of Sign Language Interpreters

Linda Siple

Richard Smith

National Technical Institute for the Deaf; Rochester, NY

Panara Theatre

 

Distance Learning Pilot: Physics and Mathematics Part I; Part II to continue at 11:00

Vince Daniele

Vicki Robinson

Gary Long

Camille Aidala

Dave Conyer

National Technical Institute for the Deaf; Rochester, NY

Rhonda Parrish

Rochester School for the Deaf; Rochester, NY

 

 

   

C o n c u r r e n t S e s s i o n I I

11-11:45 a.m.

 

FORMAL PRESENTATIONS

LBJ-1510

 

Popular Electronic Conferencing Use and Comparison

James Mallory

John Sweeney

National Technical Institute for the Deaf; Rochester, NY

Ron Fulle

Rochester Institute of Technology; Rochester, NY

LBJ-2590

 

Gallaudet Online Learning Solutions: Portals, Course Tools, and Implementation

Cynthia King, Ph.D.

Gallaudet University; Washington D.C.

LBJ-3237

 

Integrating Technology into Literacy: Digital Video Dictionary

Rosemary Stifter

Francisca Rangel

Ruth Reed

Laurent Clerc National Deaf Education Center, Gallaudet University; Washington D.C.

Panara Theatre

 

Distance Learning Pilot: Physics and Mathematics Part II; A continuation of presentation M10A

Vince Daniele

Joan Carr

Gary Long

Camille Aidala

Dave Conyer

National Technical Institute for the Deaf; Rochester, NY

Patti Spiecker

Rhonda Parrish

Rochester School for the Deaf; Rochester, NY

   

C o n c u r r e n t S e s s i o n I I I

1:30-2:15 p.m.

 

FORMAL PRESENTATIONS

LJB-1510

 

Exploring Career Opportunities Using Technology

Luanne Kowalski

Laurent Clerc National Deaf Education Center, Gallaudet University; Washington D.C.

 

 

LBJ-2590

 

Project Inclusion

Patricia DeCaro

Kenneth R. Nash

Susan Foster

National Technical Institute for the Deaf; Rochester, NY

LBJ-3205 (SIL)

 

Technology Used to Support Sign and Spoken Language Development

Bonnie Mumford

William Newell, Ph.D.

Donald Sims, G. Ph.D.

National Technical Institute for the Deaf; Rochester, NY

LBJ-3237

 

A Study of Current Models of Online Learning for Deaf Learners

Mei Kennedy-Yeh

Gallaudet University; Washington D.C.

Panara Theatre

 

Online Learning: A Learning Medium for Everyone

John Thompson, Ph.D.

Buffalo State College; Buffalo, NY

   

C o n c u r r e n t S e s s i o n I V

2:30-3:15 p.m.

 

FORMAL PRESENTATIONS

LBJ-1510

 

Cornerstones Approach to Literacy Development

Mardi Loeterman

CPB/WGBH National Center for Accessible Media; Boston, MA

Peter Paul, Ph.D.

Ohio State University; Columbus, OH

LBJ-2590

 

IdeaTools: Rapid Development Tools for Creating Interactive Multimedia — Enabled Courses on the Web

Simon Ting

Jason Pitoniak

Cathy Clarke

National Technical Institute for the Deaf; Rochester, NY

LBJ-3237

 

Using C-Print to Support Learning in Secondary and Postsecondary Settings

Lisa Elliot, Ph.D.

Michael Stinson

Barbara McKee

Pam Francis

National Technical Institute for the Deaf; Rochester, NY

 

 

Panara Theatre

 

Adequate Testing and Evaluation of On-Line Learners

James Mallory

National Technical Institute for the Deaf; Rochester, NY

   

C o n c u r r e n t S e s s i o n V

3:30-4:15 p.m.

 

FORMAL PRESENTATIONS

LBJ-1510

 

Innovative Technologies Applied in an Integrated-Curriculum Unit

Shelley Popson

Kay Ezzell

Resource Materials & Technology Center: Deaf/Hard-of-Hearing; St. Augustine, FL

LBJ-2590

 

Web-based Curriculum Development for the Social Sciences

Julie Cammeron

Simon Ting

National Technical Institute for the Deaf; Rochester, NY

LBJ-3237

 

Shared Texts, Negotiated Meanings: Perspectives On the Computer Mediated Communication of Postsecondary Students Who are Deaf

Beth Carlson

Saint Petersburg Junior College; Clearwater, FL

Panara Theatre

 

Integrating Your Social Studies Lesson Plans Using Technology in the Classroom

Barbara DiGiovanni

Gene DiVincenzo

Rochester School for the Deaf; Rochester, NY

   

P o s t e r S e s s i o n I

4:30-6 p.m.

 

POSTER PRESENTATIONS

LBJ Street

 

Learning Geography via Virtual Travel

Joyce Brody

Madison High School; San Diego, CA

LBJ Street

 

Web-Based Curriculum Development for Chemistry and Biochemistry Using IdeaTools

Paul Craig

Rochester Institute of Technology; Rochester, NY

Simon Ting

National Technical Institute for the Deaf; Rochester, NY

 

 

LBJ Street

 

Use of Graphic Design Principles to Enhance the Learning Process

Alan Cutcliffe

National Technical Institute for the Deaf; Rochester, NY

LBJ Street

 

Postsecondary Education Network International Project

James DeCaro

E. William Clymer

National Technical Institute for the Deaf; Rochester, NY

Tsutomu Araki

Tsukuba College of Technology; Tsukuba, Japan

LBJ Street

 

The Intellikeys Alternative Keyboard Solution

Lori Elliott

Phoenix Day School for the Deaf; Phoenix, AZ

LBJ Street

 

A Web-Supported Course for Deaf College-Aged Students

Linda Gottermeier

National Technical Institute for the Deaf; Rochester, NY

LBJ Street

 

Using Electronic Portfolio to Demonstrate Academic and Pedagogic Competencies

Diane Klein

Indiana University of Pennsylvania; Indiana, PA

Katharine Selmenda

Converse College; Spartanburg, SC

Sharon Baker

University of Tulsa; Tulsa, OK

LBJ Street

 

Clearinghouse On Mathematics, Engineering, Technology, and Science (COMETS): A Web-based Resource for Inservice and Preservice Teacher Education

Harry Lang

Gail Kovalik

National Technical Institute for the Deaf; Rochester, NY

LBJ Street

 

How are Teachers for the Deaf Using the Internet to Educate K-12 Deaf and Hard of Hearing Students?

Dino Lauria

National Technical Institute for the Deaf; Rochester, NY

 

 

LBJ Street

 

Supporting ASL Learning through Interactive CD ROM Technology

The American Sign Language Vocabulary CD

William Newell, Ph.D.

Marsha Young

Cecelia Dorn

National Technical Institute for the Deaf; Rochester, NY

LBJ Street

 

Using HyperStudio to Enhance Language and Reading Instruction

Brent Pitt

Utah Schools for the Deaf and the Blind; Salt Lake City, UT

LBJ Street

 

Microsoft Office ASL Project: An Interactive Resource for Teaching Deaf Students Technical Information

June Reeves

National Technical Institute for the Deaf; Rochester, NY

LBJ Street

 

Captioned Media Program

Melanie Updegraff

St. Mary’s School for the Deaf; Buffalo, NY

 

 

 

 

 

 

T U E S D A Y, J U N E 2 6

   

P o s t e r S e s s i o n II

8:30-10 a.m.

 

Poster Presentations

LBJ Street

 

A Web-Based Initiative to Infuse English Across the Curriculum for Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing Students

Gerald Berent

E. William Clymer

National Technical Institute for the Deaf; Rochester, NY

LBJ Street

 

Video Communication System

Lori Elliott

Phoenix Day School for the Deaf; Phoenix, AZ

LBJ Street

 

Demonstration of MAGpie 2.0 Software for Creating Captions and Audio Descriptions

Geoff Freed

CPB/WGBH National Center for Accessible Media; Boston, MA

LBJ Street

 

What’s Worthwhile on the Web

Ken Kurlychek

Laurent Clerc National Deaf Education Center, Gallaudet University; Washington D.C.

Lori Steed

Parent of Deaf Child; Arroyo Grande, CA

LBJ Street

 

Creating Age-Appropriate Instructional Materials for Deaf Students with Minimal Language Skills

Brad Moseley

Anita Farquhar

Jennifer Chatterton

American School for the Deaf; West Hartford, CT

LBJ Street

 

ACCESS: Applying Computers Creatively to Enhance Student Skills

Dana Perez

Sunshine Cottage School for Deaf Children; San Antonio, TX

LBJ Street

 

American Sign Language Dictionary and Inflection Guide

Geoffrey Poor

Dorothy Wilkins

National Technical Institute for the Deaf; Rochester, NY

 

 

LBJ Street

 

Bring Your Camera on the Road to New York State Standards

George Potanovic

New York School for the Deaf; White Plains, NY

LBJ Street

 

Social Studies and the Internet

Mark Rust

Maryland School for the Deaf; Frederick, MD

LBJ Street

 

The Write Technology

Barbara Strassman

The College of New Jersey; Ewing, NJ

LBJ Street

 

Deaf President Now Interactive

Janet Terry

Joyce Brody

Madison High School; San Diego, CA

LBJ Street

 

Online Bookclubs Using Free Internet E-Boards

Denise Warren

Utah Schools for the Deaf and Blind; Ogden, UT

LBJ Street

 

Virtual Reality Education for Assisted Learning (VREAL)

Robert Edge

VREAL Consortium; Orlando, FL

   

C o n c u r r e n t S e s s i o n V I

10:00-10:45 a.m.

 

FORMAL PRESENTATIONS

LBJ-1510

 

Technology to Support Visually-Impaired Deaf & Hard-of-Hearing Students

Josara Wallber

National Technical Institute for the Deaf; Rochester, NY

LBJ-2590

 

CART in the Classroom: How to Make Realtime Captioning Work for You

Duane Smith

National Court Reporters Association; Vienna, VA

Patricia Graves

Caption First; Franklin Park, IL

LBJ-3237

 

Two Streams of Captions for Children’s Television

Mardi Loeterman

CPB/WGBH National Center for Accessible Media; Boston, MA

Peter Paul, Ph.D.

Ohio State University; Columbus, OH

 

 

LBJ-3355

 

NTID’s Educational Technology Resource Room, A Supportive Environment for Acquisition and Application of Instructional Technologies

Marsha Young

National Technical Institute for the Deaf; Rochester, NY

Panara Theatre

 

Impact of SMART Boards on Learning Instruction

Rosemary Stifter

Laurent Clerc National Deaf Education Center, Gallaudet University; Washington D.C.

   

C o n c u r r e n t S e s s i o n V I I

11:00-11:45 a.m.

 

FORMAL PRESENTATIONS

LBJ-2450

(Learning Center)

 

NTID Learning Consortium

Ken Finton

Bonnie Mumford

Mindi Failing

National Technical Institute for the Deaf; Rochester, NY

LBJ-2590

 

Innovative ways of using ICT (Information & Communication Technology) to improve literacy and communication skills for deaf learners

Ken Carter

Helen Lansdown

Matthew James

Deafax Trust, University of Reading; Reading, United Kingdom

LBJ-3237

 

Implementing Video Streamed Instruction for Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing Online Learners

James Mallory

National Technical Institute for the Deaf; Rochester, NY

Panara Theatre

 

PEPNet Online Training for Students Who are Deaf or Hard of Hearing: Preparing for College Success

Debra Wilcox Hsu

David Buchkoski

Midwest Center for Postsecondary Outreach; St. Paul, MN

Marcia Kovitz

Kay Jursik

Postsecondary Consortium Network; Knoxville, TN

Gary Sanderson

Western Region Outreach and Consortia Center; Northridge, CA

Pat Billies

Northeast Technical Center (NTID); Rochester, NY

   

C o n c u r r e n t S e s s i o n V I I I

1:30-2:15 p.m.

 

Formal Presentations

07-A321

(Directions available at the Registration/Information desk)

 

NTID’s High Technology Center: A model of a centralized, industry funded, cross curricular, multipurpose graphic media and publishing facility

Ed Mineck

National Technical Institute for the Deaf; Rochester, NY

LBJ-2590

 

Developing a Successful A-Team for Teaching ASL on a Broadband Network

Barbara Keefe

University of Maine System Network; Augusta, ME

Sally Gatehouse

Gov. Baxter School for the Deaf; Portland, ME

Sharon Fairfield

Gardiner High School; Gardiner, ME

LBJ-3237

 

Going the Distance to Meet the New York State Social Studies Standards

Sherri Juhas

Judy Corceran-Culhane

East Islip High School, Cleary Secondary Program; Islip Terrace, NY

Panara Theatre

 

Using Technology to Deliver a Distance Education Program to Interpreters Working in K-12 Settings: A Model of Collaboration Between the Deaf Community, State Education Agencies, and a Post-Secondary Institution

Leilani Johnson, Ed.D

FRCC @ Lowry Campus; Denver, CO

   

C o n c u r r e n t S e s s i o n I X

2:30-3:15 p.m.

 

FORMAL PRESENTATIONS

LBJ-1510

 

Strategies for Assessing the Impact of Technology in the Online and Distance Learning Teaching/Learning Process

Mary Ellsworth

Model Secondary School for the Deaf; Washington D.C.

Teresa Huckleberry

Indiana School for the Deaf; Indianapolis, IN

 

 

LBJ-2590

 

New Accomplishments Using Voice Recognition for Captioning of Chemistry Videotapes Made During Regular F2F Courses

Robert Paine

Rochester Institute of Technology; Rochester, NY

LBJ-3237

 

Technology in Education Can Empower Deaf Students — A Teacher Training Initiative

Phil Mackall

Laurent Clerc National Deaf Education Center, Gallaudet University; Washington D.C.

Panara Theatre

 

Accessible Online and Educational Media: Research, Development and Standards

Geoff Freed

Larry Goldberg

CPB/WGBH National Center for Accessible Media; Boston, MA

   

C o n c u r r e n t S e s s i o n X

3:30-4:15 p.m.

 

FORMAL PRESENTATIONS

LBJ-1510

 

Digital Video Conferencing for Remote Tutoring/Teaching of Deaf Students

James Mallory

Dean Lauria

National Technical Institute for the Deaf; Rochester, NY

LBJ-2590

 

Manguage" Class — Where Math and Language Meet

Susan Cooper

Sue Clark

Florida School for the Deaf and Blind; St. Augustine, FL

LBJ-3237

 

Assessing Technology Intervention: Results from the TecEds Project

Kathy Pongor

Laurent Clerc National Deaf Education Center, Gallaudet University; Washington D.C.

Panara Theatre

 

Washington State’s Shared Reading Video Outreach Project: Learning Via Interactive Videoconferencing

Howie Seago

Washington Sensory Disabilities Services; Burien, WA

 

 

 

   

W E D N E S D A Y, J U N E 2 7

   

C o n c u r r e n t S e s s i o n X I

10-10:45 a.m.

 

FORMAL PRESENTATIONS

LBJ-1510

 

Virtual High School: on-line electives for a small student body. There is power behind choices.

Mark Rust

Maryland School for the Deaf; Frederick, MD

LBJ-2590

 

Virtual Classroom: Web-Based Remote Teaching & Small-Group Tutoring in Real Time

Simon Ting

Jason Pitoniak

Cathy Clarke

National Technical Institute for the Deaf; Rochester, NY

LBJ-3237

 

Use of Multimedia and Computer Networks to Facilitate Educational Collaboration for Deaf Students at Tsukuba College of Technology, Japan

Tsutomu Araki

Tsukuba College of Technology; Tsukuba, Japan

Panara Theatre

 

Project Access: Use of Computer Technology at Hungarian Schools for the Deaf

To Continue at 11:00

Kenneth Nash

National Technical Institute for the Deaf; Rochester, NY

Szuzsa Biro

Kaposvar School for the Deaf; Kaposvar Hungary

Ferenc Boldvai

Budapest School for the Hard-of-Hearing; Budapest, Hungary

Erzebet Horvath

Sopron School for the Deaf; Sopron, Hungary

Szuzsa Tahy

Hungarian Association of Teachers of Informatics; Budapest Hungary

 

 

   

C o n c u r r e n t S e s s i o n X I

11:00-11:45 a.m.

 

FORMAL PRESENTATIONS

LBJ-1510

 

NTID’s Instructional Technology Consortium

E. William Clymer

Doug MacKenzie

Christine Monikowski

Myra Pelz

National Technical Institute for the Deaf; Rochester, NY

LBJ-2590

 

Assistive Technology and Learning: It Works AND It’s the Law

Donna Sorkin

Alexander Graham Bell Association; Washington D.C.

Karen Youdelman

Millridge Center for Hearing Impaired Children (MCHI); Highland Heights, OH

LBJ-3237

 

Realtime Remote Online Captioning: An Effective Accommodation for Rural Schools and Colleges

Bryce Fifield

North Dakota Center for Persons with Disabilities; Minot, ND

Panara Theater

 

Project Access: Use of Computer Technology at Hungarian Schools for the Deaf

A continuation of presentation W10A

Kenneth Nash

National Technical Institute for the Deaf; Rochester, NY

Szuzsa Biro

Kaposvar School for the Deaf; Kaposvar Hungary

Ferenc Boldvai

Budapest School for the Hard-of-Hearing; Budapest, Hungary

Erzebet Horvath

Sopron School for the Deaf; Sopron, Hungary

Szuzsa Tahy

Hungarian Association of Teachers of Informatics; Budapest Hungary

 

 

 

   

T H U R S D A Y, J U N E 2 8

9 a.m.- 4 p.m.

 

WORKSHOPS

LBJ-3225

LBJ-3235

 

 

Facilitative and Assistive Technology to Improve Communication and Communication Access

Paula Brown, Ph.D.

This workshop will expose participants to a variety of technologies and associated strategies that facilitate or improve access to information communicated in individual and group situations. Technologies covered will include those used to translate voice to text, to enhance the visual presentation of print, to transmit digital messages, and to provide visual feedback regarding communicative endeavors. Technologies will be demonstrated so that participants can view their use in meaningful contexts. Participants will also engage in hands-on activities that will enable them to experiment with the technologies and see how they function in instructional situations.

LBJ-2470

LBJ-3225

LBJ-2462

 

E-Learning Possibilities

Christine Monikowski

Camille Aidala

Denise Hazelwood

In this day of e-learning, it is helpful to have a working knowledge of some of the resources available to teachers. More and more educational settings (K-college) are offering courses via distance: videoconferencing a Physics lessons for high school seniors who have completed courses offered at their home residential school; distance workshops for working interpreters who need to upgrade specific skills; web-based courses so college students can take Deaf Studies courses and transfer the credits back to their own institution. The possibilities for Deaf and HH students are as vast as they are for their hearing counterparts. In this all-day workshop, we will explore the possibilities and see if some can be applied to our own individual settings. Approximately 75% of workshop time will be hands-on.

The goals of this workshop are:

  • To examine Distance Learning principles used here at RIT
  • To gain knowledge about the current field of e-learning (distance learning, distance education)
  • as it relates to Deaf and HH students through videoconferencing
  • To become familiar with resources available on the web for e-learning (including course development to the actual delivery)

 

LBJ- 2580

 

Integrating Digital Video Technology into the Curriculum

Rick Simpson

Digital video enables teachers and students to utilize cutting edge technology in an educational setting. Today's deaf students, like their hearing counterparts, have grown-up using computers and already have the skills to take advantage of this technology. Approximately 60-75% of the workshop will be hands-on. This workshop will provide participants with an opportunity to learn to use digital video to: enhance their school's curricula; turn their classroom/computer room into a video editing suite; encourage teamwork, communication skills and organization; enhance student projects and community interaction. In this workshop participants will learn: how to shoot effective interesting video using a digital camcorder; how to connect a digital camera to an iMac or G4 computer; how to edit video using iMovie.

 

LBJ-3355

 

Microsoft Word

Deborah J. Poe

In this workshop, participants will learn intermediate features of Word 2000 (PC) or Word 98 (Mac),

including formatting, tables, mail merge, templates, graphic images and effects, clip-art and page layout capabilities. A series of 8-10 projects have been designed for this workshop based on forms, stationary, worksheets, and other documents common to classroom management, classroom instruction, and interoffice communication. Approximately 70% of the workshop time will be hands-on.

Carey-1285

 

Web Development with FrontPage 2000

Don Beil

This workshop is an introduction to creating web sites. It will be taught in a Microsoft Windows computer laboratory (established by a grant from the National Science Foundation) using FrontPage 2000, a popular, powerful web-creation tool also from Microsoft. At the end of the day attendees will have created and published a small web site using the following features: links, a navigation bar, text formatting, themes, graphics, and tables. The day will be divided equally between demonstration by the workshop leader and individual hands-on practice by the attendees, each of whom will be provided with a computer for the day. Samples of web sites designed for classroom and student use will be presented. Each participant will receive a workbook with sample files that will be used to guide the instruction. Attendees should be familiar with the Internet and web browsers, with word processing, and with Microsoft Windows. No prior knowledge of FrontPage is necessary.

 

 

 

 

   

F R I D A Y, J U N E 2 9

9 a.m. - 4 p.m.

 

WORKSHOPS

LBJ-1440

 

Effective Presentations Using PowerPoint

David Hazelwood

In this workshop, participants will learn how to create more effective presentations in Microsoft PowerPoint by using intermediate level tools and features. Topics will include planning the presentation, basic layout and design, creating and importing graphic elements and digital images, templates, and incorporating motion graphics such as QuickTime video. Attendees will also learn how to effectively utilize PowerPoint drawing tools, slide master, slide animation, slide transition, and timing. If time permits, the use of hyperlinks and exporting PowerPoint to the web will be introduced.

The day will be divided between demonstrations and individual hands-on experience. Attendees should be familiar with PowerPoint at a basic level and be able to create simple PowerPoint presentations.

 

Booth-A321-B

 

Digital Imaging Essentials

Ed Mineck

This workshop provides hands-on training in digital image acquisition and processing. It will include the essential issues that effect and determine the quality of digital images including resolution, color space, and basic color and sharpness controls. Resolution will be demystified (dpi, ppi, lpi, megapixel). Learn the differences between and appropriate use of file formats (BMP, PCT(PICT), GIF, JPG(JEPG), PING, TIF(TIFF)).

Participants will experience acquiring and processing images from a variety of sources including: a digital camera; a scanner; a Kodak Picture CD; a Kodak Photo CD; a stock photo source on CD; an internet download and a clip art library.

 

LBJ-2420

LBJ-2430

LBJ-2440

LBJ-2470

LBJ-2500

LBJ-3771

 

Strategies for Using Technology to Support Classroom Instruction

Kathleen Eilers-crandall

John Panara

Robert Menchel

Victoria Robinson

David Templeton

Larry Quinsland

In this workshop, participants will learn how to incorporate technology in their classroom instruction for students who are deaf or hard of hearing. Participants will examine the tools, techniques, and materials used for teaching in a "smart classroom." After introducing participants to the technology in the classroom, participants will examine ways in which teaching and learning English can be enhanced within this environment. Attendees will have opportunities to experience the instructional process from "both sides of the console." The workshop will include use of the Internet for English education and for optical physics laboratory experiments. Participants will learn how digital cameras and video are used in science education for the delivery of instruction and in student work; particular attention will be paid to simple editing and image manipulation. The workshop is equally divided between demonstrations and individual hands-on practice. Attendees do not need prior experience with technology.

 

 

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

The Symposium Management Team wishes to thank the following companies for sponsoring Symposium activities and donating equipment:

  • Dell Computer Corporation donated the PC desktop computers that will be used by all plenary and concurrent sessions. Dell also donated laptop computers that are being used by the Symposium Management Team.
  • Apple Computer, Inc. made available the use of 12 iMac computers that will be used in the Integrating Digital Video Technology into the Curriculum Workshop on Thursday, June 28, 2001. The lab used for this workshop (LBJ-2580) will be open from noon until 1:30 p.m. on Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday of the Symposium week.

 

HOST INSTITUTION

Rochester Institute of Technology

National Technical Institute for the Deaf

Lyndon Baines Johnson Building

52 Lomb Memorial Drive

Rochester, NY 14623-5604

(716) 475-6700 (Voice/TTY)

The National Technical Institute for the Deaf (NTID), is the world’s largest technological college for deaf students. One of eight colleges of Rochester Institute of Technology, NTID represents the world’s first effort to educate large numbers of deaf students within a college campus planned principally for hearing students. Among RIT’s 13,000 full- and part-time students are nearly 1,100 college-age deaf students from the United States and other countries.

For more information about NTID’s programs and services, call (716) 475-6700 (voice/TTY).