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Biomedical Engineering BS

Semester Requirements

Steven Weinstein, Head, Chemical/Biomedical Engineering
(585) 475-4299, steven.weinstein@rit.edu

Dan Phillips, Director, Biomedical Engineering Program
(585) 475-2309, dbpeee@rit.edu

http://www.rit.edu/kgcoe/biomedical

Program overview

Educational objectives

The bachelor of science degree in biomedical engineering prepares graduates to:

  • apply fundamental knowledge, skills, and tools of engineering in a wide variety of biomedical application domains.
  • possess a broad education and knowledge of contemporary issues relevant to the practice of the biomedical engineering profession.
  • engage in lifelong learning as a means of adapting to change, refining skill level, and remaining aware of professional and societal issues.
  • communicate effectively as individuals, and within and across teams.
  • accept the professional and ethical responsibilities to function as a biomedical engineer in society.
  • work as engineering professionals in the private or public sector.
  • enter graduate education programs and obtain advanced degrees, if desired.

Biomedical engineers are intimately involved in the development of devices and techniques to address issues associated with the state of human health. Such development is inherently a multidisciplinary endeavor requiring expertise from a wide range of professionals, and in particular engineers from the classical disciplines such as chemical, electrical, and mechanical engineering. This is true whether in industrial, research, or clinical settings. A fully successful multidisciplinary team must have at least one member who possesses a comprehensive understanding of the highly variable and intricate nature of the biomedical system of interest. This team member must possess the quantitative and analytical engineering skills needed to precisely define the challenge that is being addressed and assess the relative effectiveness of plausible solution strategies. This crucial role can be performed effectively by a biomedical engineer expressly educated to meet those requirements and qualifications.

The BS degree in biomedical engineering delivers a focused curriculum that targets the biomedical enterprise from a highly quantitative and analytically rigorous perspective. The goal is to enable participants to compete successfully for engineering-related positions immediately upon graduation or to pursue post-graduate education in engineering, science, or medicine. Undergraduates will have the ability to contribute significantly to the development of new knowledge, understanding, and innovative solutions in the health care industry and across a wide variety of health care related research applications.

Curriculum

Biomedical engineering is a five-year program consisting of 50 weeks of cooperative employment experience and the following course requirements: biomedical engineering core, professional technical electives, science and mathematics, liberal arts, free electives, and wellness education. The program culminates in the fifth year with a two-course multidisciplinary design sequence, a capstone design experience that integrates engineering theory, principles, and processes within a collaborative environment that bridges engineering disciplines.

Biomedical engineering, BS degree, typical course sequence (semesters), effective fall 2013

Course Sem. Cr. Hrs.
First Year
  LAS Foundation 1: First Year Seminar† 3
BIME-181 Introduction to Biomedical Engineering 1
CHMG-141 LAS Perspective 5: General and Analytical Chemistry I 3
CHMG-145 LAS Perspective 5: General and Analytical Chemistry I Lab 1
MATH-181 Project-Based Calculus I 4
  LAS Foundation 2: First Year Writing 3
BIME-182 Introduction to Biomedical Engineering II 1
CHMG-142 General and Analytical Chemistry II 3
CHMG-146 General and Analytical Chemistry II Lab 1
MATH-182 Project-Based Calculus II 4
PHYS-211 University Physics I 4
  LAS Perspective 1 3
  Wellness Education* 0
Second Year
BIME-200 Introductory Musculoskeletal Biomechanics 3
BIME-250 Engineering Analysis I 3
BIME-391 Biomechanics and Biomaterials Lab 1
BIOG-140 Cell and Molecular Biology for Engineers I 3
MATH-231 Differential Equations 3
BIME-370 Introduction to Biomaterials Science 3
CHME-320 Continuum Mechanics I 3
BIOG-141 Cell and Molecular Biology for Engineers II 3
MATH-221 Multivariable and Vector Calculus 4
PHYS-212 LAS Perspective 6: University Physics II 4
  LAS Perspective 2 3
EGEN-099 Engineering Co-op Preparation 0
Third Year
BIME-499 Cooperative Education (fall)  Co-op
BIME-410 Systems Physiology I 3
BIME-440 Biomedical Signals and Analysis 3
CQAS-251 LAS Perspective 7A: Probability and Statistics for Engineers I 3
BIOG-142 Biocompatibility and the Immune System 3
  LAS Perspective  3, 4 6
Fourth Year
BIME-411 Systems Physiology II (WI) 3
MECE-407 Biomedical Device Engineering 3
CQAS-252 LAS Perspective 7B: Probability and Statistics for Engineers II 3
BIME-450 Engineering Analysis II 3
BIME-491 Quantitative Physiological Signal Analysis Lab 1
  LAS Immersion 1 3
BIME-499 Cooperative Education (spring) Co-op
Fifth Year
BIME-497 Multidisciplinary Senior Design I 3
BIME-460 Dynamics and Control of Biomedical Systems 3
  Professional Electives 6
  Free Electives 6
  LAS Immersion 2, 3 6
BIME-492 Systems Physiology Control and Dynamics Lab 1
BIME-498 Multidisciplinary Senior Design II 3
CQAS-325 DOE for Biomedical Engineers 3
Total Semester Credit Hours 129

Please see New General Education Curriculum–Liberal Arts and Sciences (LAS) for more information.

(WI) Refers to a writing intensive course within the major.

* Please see Wellness Education Requirement for more information. Students completing bachelor's degrees are required to complete two Wellness courses.

† The First Year Seminar requirement is replaced by an LAS Elective for the 2013-14 academic year.

Concentrations

Biomaterials

An important feature of materials intended for biomedical applications is their compatibility with the environment in which they are employed. This presumes a solid knowledge and understanding of a wide variety of biologically compatible materials. Similarly, the dynamic behavior of the materials in response to stress, strain, and wear must often be assessed in terms of efficacy, safety, and durability. Useful and rigorous modeling, as well as the design and evaluation of material performance, requires a strong foundation in physics, chemistry, and mathematics (including statistics) along with an understanding of appropriate and accurate analysis methods. Courses for this type of work are provided in the core curriculum of the program. However, electives that provide additional expertise in this area (e.g.: material science, probability and statistics, chemistry and chemical engineering) may be obtained by selecting the biomaterials concentration.

Biomedical device and system design

Students will develop the ability to propose and assess innovative ideas and understand the type of analysis and assessment tools that are key elements in the process of developing robust designs. Constraints on such designs are safe and efficient devices, systems, and processes for biomedical applications. This represents a need in industrial, research, and clinical environments, and includes therapeutic, rehabilitative, and research-oriented developments.

Biomedical signal processing

Biological systems are inherently complex and are composed of processes, mechanisms, and phenomena that interact, often in parallel and across a wide range of scales and environments. The ability to determine key aspects of those systems for biomedical applications requires a rigorous and in-depth capability to detect, process, and interpret signals that can be extracted and measured, often in the midst of noise and confounding information. Producing reliable information that can be used to assess or understand those systems requires careful processing and interpretation of available signals.

Physiological modeling, dynamics, and control

Homeostasis is fundamentally a feedback process. Generally, biological systems contain a myriad of interrelated and interacting feedback systems that are inherently non-deterministic in nature and usually have a variety of optimal or satisfactory operating points. If the goal of a therapeutic or rehabilitative system or intervention is to predict the outcome of some intended action, then it becomes essential to accurately model the behavior of the relevant characteristics of the targeted system. This type of analysis can be used to support fundamental research as well as help provide guidance to develop a new device or system. A concentration in this area builds on the core elements of the curriculum as well as an understanding, from a systems perspective, of human physiology.

[arrow] Click to view program requirements in the Quarter Calendar

Quarter Curriculum - For Reference Only

Effective fall 2013, RIT will convert its academic calendar from quarters to semesters. The following content has been made available as reference only. Currently matriculated students who began their academic programs in quarters should consult their academic adviser for guidance and course selection.

Program overview

Educational objectives

The bachelor of science degree in biomedical engineering prepares graduates to:

  • apply fundamental knowledge, skills, and tools of engineering in a wide variety of biomedical application domains.
  • possess a broad education and knowledge of contemporary issues relevant to the practice of the biomedical engineering profession.
  • engage in lifelong learning as a means of adapting to change, refining skill level, and remaining aware of professional and societal issues.
  • communicate effectively as individuals, and within and across teams.
  • accept the professional and ethical responsibilities to function as a biomedical engineer in society.
  • work as engineering professionals in the private or public sector.
  • enter graduate education programs and obtain advanced degrees, if desired.

Biomedical engineers are intimately involved in the development of devices and techniques to address health-state issues. Such development is inherently a multidisciplinary endeavor requiring expertise from a wide range of professionals, and in particular engineers from the classical disciplines such as chemical, electrical, and mechanical engineering. This is true whether in industrial, research, or clinical settings. A fully successful multidisciplinary team must have at least one member who possesses a comprehensive understanding of the highly variable and intricate nature of the biomedical system of interest. This team member must possess the quantitative and analytical engineering skills needed to precisely define the challenge that is being addressed and assess the relative effectiveness of plausible solution strategies. This crucial role can be performed effectively by a biomedical engineer expressly educated to meet those requirements and qualifications.

The BS degree in biomedical engineering delivers a focused curriculum that targets the biomedical enterprise from a highly quantitative and analytically rigorous perspective. The goal is to enable participants to compete successfully for engineering-related positions immediately upon graduation or to pursue post-graduate education in engineering, science, or medicine. Undergraduates will have the ability to contribute significantly to the development of new knowledge, understanding, and innovative solutions in the health care industry and across a wide variety of health care related research applications.

Curriculum

Biomedical engineering is a five-year program consisting of 50 weeks of cooperative employment experience and the following course requirements: biomedical engineering core, professional technical electives, science and mathematics, liberal arts, free electives, wellness education, and First-Year Enrichment. The program culminates in the fifth year with a two-course multidisciplinary design sequence, a capstone design experience that integrates engineering theory, principles, and processes within a collaborative environment that bridges engineering disciplines.

Semester conversion
Effective fall 2013, RIT will convert its academic calendar from quarters to semesters. Each program and its associated courses have been sent to the New York State Department of Education for approval of the semester plan. For reference, the following charts illustrate the typical course sequence for this program in both quarters and semesters. Students should consult their academic advisers with questions regarding planning and course selection.

Biomedical engineering, BS degree, typical course sequence (quarters)

CourseQtr. Cr. Hrs.
First Year
0310-051 Discovery Biomedical Engineering 1
1720-052 Pathways‡ 1
0310-181 Biomedical Engineering Seminar 1
0310-182, 183 Introduction to Biomedical Engineering I, II 2
1011-215, 216, 217 General Chemistry I, II, III 10
1011-205, 206, 227 General Chemistry Lab I, II, III 3
1017-311, 312 University Physics I, II and Labs 10
1016-281, 282, 283 Calculus I, II, III 12
  Liberal Arts* 12
  Wellness Education† 0
Second Year
0310-200 Functional Anatomy and Lab 4
0310-250 Engineering Analysis I 4
0310-320 Mechanics of Biosystems and Lab 4
0310-310 Thermo I: Single Component 4
0310-370 Biomaterials Science and Lab 4
0310-330 Bio E&M and Lab 5
0309-320 Fluid Mechanics I 4
1016-305 Multiple Variable Calculus 4
1016-306 Differential Equations 4
1004-240, 241 Cell and Molecular Biology for Engineers I, II and Lab 8
1004-242 Biocompatibility and the Immune System 3
  Wellness Education† 0
Third Year
0310-410, 411 System Physiology I, II and Labs 8
0310-440 BME Signals and Analysis and Lab 5
0310-450 Engineering Analysis II 4
0307-361, 362 Probability and Statistics for Eng. I, II 8
  Liberal Arts* 8
  Cooperative Education§ Co-op
Fourth Year
0310-412 System Physiology III and Lab 4
0304-646 Biomedical Device Engineering 4
0307-420 DOE for BME 4
0310-550 Dynamics and Control of Biomedical Systems 5
  Professional Technical Elective 4
  Liberal Arts* 8
  Free Elective 4
  Cooperative Education§ Co-op
Fifth Year
0309-591, 592 Multidisciplinary Design I, II 8
  Professional Technical Electives 8
  Liberal Arts* 8
  Free Electives 8
  Cooperative Education§ Co-op
Total Quarter Credit Hours 198

* Please see Liberal Arts General Education Requirements for more information.

† Please see Wellness Education Requirement for more information.

‡ Students are required to complete one Pathways course. Students may choose from Innovation/Creativity (1720-052), Leadership (1720-053), or Service (1720-054). These courses may be completed in the winter or spring quarter.

§ Students are required to complete five quarters of cooperative education.

Biomedical engineering, BS degree, typical course sequence (semesters), effective fall 2013

CourseSem. Cr. Hrs.
First Year
  LAS Foundation 1: First-Year Seminar 3
BIME-181 Introduction to Biomedical Engineering 1
CHMG-141 LAS Perspective 5: General and Analytical Chemistry I 3
CHMG-145 LAS Perspective 5: General and Analytical Chemistry I Lab 1
MATH-181 Project-Based Calculus I 4
ENGL-150 LAS Foundation 2: Writing Seminar 3
BIME-182 Introduction to Biomedical Engineering II 1
CHMG-142 General and Analytical Chemistry II 3
CHMG-146 General and Analytical Chemistry II Lab 1
MATH-182 Project-Based Calculus II 4
PHYS-211 University Physics 4
  LAS Perspective 1 3
  Wellness Education* 0
Second Year
BIME-200 Functional Anatomy 3
BIME-250 Engineering Analysis I 3
CHME-230 Chemical Processes Analysis 3
BIOG-240 Cell/Bio for Engineers I 3
MATH-231 Differential Equations 3
BIME-370 Biomaterials 3
CHME-320 Continuum Mech I 3
BIOG-241 Cell/Mol Bio for Engineers II 3
MATH-221 Multi Variable and Vector Calculus 4
PHYS-212 LAS Perspective 6: University Physics II 4
Third Year
BIME-499 Cooperative Education (fall)  Co-op
BIME-410 Systems Physiology I 3
BIME-440 Biomed and Analysis 3
CQAS-251 LAS Perspective 7B: Probability and Statistics for Engineers I 3
BIOG-242 Biocomp/Immune 3
  LAS Perspective 2, 3 6
Fourth Year
BIME-411 Systems Physiology II 3
MECE-557 Biomedical Device Engineering 3
CQAS-252 LAS Perspective 7B: Probability and Statistics for Engineers II 3
BIME-450 Eng Analysis II 3
  LAS Perspective 4 3
  LAS Immersion 1 3
BIME-499 Cooperative Education (spring) Co-op
Fifth Year
BIME-497 Multi-Disc Design I 3
BIME-460 Dyn/Ctrl Biomedical Systems 3
  Professional Electives 6
  Free Electives 6
  LAS Immersion 2, 3 6
BIME-498 Multi-Disc Design II 3
CQAS-325 DOE for Biomedicl Engineers 3
Total Semester Credit Hours 129

Please see New General Education Curriculum–Liberal Arts and Sciences (LAS) for more information.

(WI) Refers to a writing intensive course within the major.

* Please see Wellness Education Requirement for more information.

Concentrations

Biomaterials

An important feature of materials intended for biomedical applications is their compatibility with the environment in which they are employed. This presumes a solid knowledge and understanding of a wide variety of biologically compatible materials. Similarly, the dynamic behavior of the materials in response to stress, strain, and wear must often be assessed in terms of efficacy, safety, and durability. Useful and rigorous modeling, as well as the design and evaluation of material performance, requires a strong foundation in physics, chemistry, and mathematics (including statistics) along with an understanding of appropriate and accurate analysis methods. Courses for this type of work are provided in the core curriculum of the program. However, electives that provide additional expertise in this area (e.g.: material science, probability and statistics, chemistry and chemical engineering) may be obtained by selecting the biomaterials concentration.

Biomedical device and system design

Students will develop the ability to propose and assess innovative ideas and understand the type of analysis and assessment tools that are key elements in the process of developing robust designs. Constraints on such designs are safe and efficient devices, systems, and processes for biomedical applications. This represents a need in industrial, research, and clinical environments, and includes therapeutic, rehabilitative, and research-oriented developments.

Biomedical signal processing

Biological systems are inherently complex and are composed of processes, mechanisms, and phenomena that interact, often in parallel and across a wide range of scales and environments. The ability to determine key aspects of those systems for biomedical applications requires a rigorous and in-depth capability to detect, process, and interpret signals that can be extracted and measured, often in the midst of noise and confounding information. Producing reliable information that can be used to assess or understand those systems requires careful processing and interpretation of available signals.

Physiological modeling, dynamics, and control

Homeostasis is fundamentally a feedback process. Generally, biological systems contain a myriad of interrelated and interacting feedback systems that are inherently non-deterministic in nature and usually have a variety of optimal or satisfactory operating points. If the goal of a therapeutic or rehabilitative system or intervention is to predict the outcome of some intended action, then it becomes essential to accurately model the behavior of the relevant characteristics of the targeted system. This type of analysis can be used to support fundamental research as well as help provide guidance to develop a new device or system. A concentration in this area builds on the core elements of the curriculum as well as an understanding, from a systems perspective, of human physiology.