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National Technical Institute for the Deaf

National Technical Institute for the Deaf - Undergraduate Faculty

Gerard J. Buckley, BS, Rochester Institute of Technology; MSW, University of Missouri; Ed.D., University of Kansas—President, NTID and Vice President and Dean, RIT; Associate Professor

Academic Affairs

Stephen F. Aldersley, BS, University of Surrey (United Kingdom); MA, College of St. Rose; Ed.D., University of Rochester—Associate Vice President for Academic Affairs; Professor

National Technical Institute for the Deaf - Graduate Faculty

Gerald C. Bateman, BS, MS, State University College at Geneseo; Ed.D., University of Rochester—Professor; Director, Curriculum and Teaching

Carol Lee De Filippo, BA, Newark State College; MS, Purdue University; MS, Ph.D., Washington University—Professor, Communication Sciences: Audiology

Susan Foster, BA, Northwestern University; BS, University of Maine; M.Ed., Bridgewater State College; Ph.D., Syracuse University—Professor, Special Education and Rehabilitation

Pre-baccalaureate Studies

General information

The pre-baccalaureate studies program is available to students who are accepted by NTID and are close to, but not fully ready for, direct entry into a baccalaureate-level program through one of the other colleges of RIT. It is a bridge program for qualified students, based on academic transcripts, scores on admissions tests, and other evidence that supports a reasonable expectation of success in baccalaureate course work. Qualified students who are undecided as to a program of study may choose the pre-baccalaureate studies career exploration option. 

Pre-baccalaureate Studies

General information

The pre-baccalaureate studies program is available to students who are accepted by NTID and are close to, but not fully ready for, direct entry into a baccalaureate-level program through one of the other colleges of RIT. It is a bridge program for qualified students, based on academic transcripts, scores on admissions tests, and other evidence that supports a reasonable expectation of success in baccalaureate course work. Qualified students who are undecided as to a program of study may choose the pre-baccalaureate studies career exploration option.

Performing Arts

Semester Requirements

Aaron Kelstone, Program Director
(585) 286-1659, abwnpa@rit.edu

http://www.rit.edu/NTID/pa

Program overview

The performing arts certificate is designed to provide students with an additional set of marketable skills. Students develop knowledge of standard theatrical operating procedures as well as principles and practices of theater accessibility for deaf people, allowing them to work in professional, regional, and community theater. The certificate also provides a solid foundation for both deaf and hearing students who wish to pursue further education in film, video, theater, and related forms of performing arts.

[arrow] Click to view program requirements in the Quarter Calendar

Quarter Curriculum - For Reference Only

Effective fall 2013, RIT will convert its academic calendar from quarters to semesters. The following content has been made available as reference only. Currently matriculated students who began their academic programs in quarters should consult their academic adviser for guidance and course selection.

Program overview

The performing arts certificate is designed to provide students with an additional set of marketable skills. Students develop knowledge of standard theatrical operating procedures as well as principles and practices of theater accessibility for deaf people, allowing them to work in professional, regional, and community theater. The program also provides a solid foundation for both deaf and hearing students who wish to pursue further education in film, video, theater, and related forms of performing arts.

The certificate includes knowledge of theater terminology, practices, and protocols; issues in script analysis; ASL translation and accessibility; and experience in performance and technical theater. Students may take four 3 quarter credit hour courses in the performance/script track (for students interested in acting, dramaturgy, translation, and dance/movement) or the technical theater track (for students interested in scenic, lighting, and costume design/technology, and stage management). A 3 quarter credit hour production practicum is required for both tracks. Students are granted the performing arts certificate upon successful completion of 15 quarter credit hours.

This program is not intended as a stand-alone certification. Applicants for the performing arts certificates must be matriculated and in good standing in an undergraduate program at RIT/NTID or graduates holding an undergraduate degree from one of those programs. Introduction to Performing Arts (0881-250) is a prerequisite.

Curriculum

Performing arts (performance/script emphasis), certificate, typical course sequence (quarters)

CourseQtr. Cr. Hrs.
0881-298 Performing Arts Practicum 3
Choose four of the following: 12
   0881-256    Script Analysis  
   0881-210    Acting I  
   0881-260    Acting II  
   0881-258    Introduction to Play Creating  
   0881-168    Jazz  
   0881-266    Ballet  
   0881-267    Fundamentals of Choreography  
   0881-202    History of Theater  
   0881-204    Deaf Theater History  
   0881-217    Stage Combat  
   0881-218    Dance History  
   0881-166    Sign Mime and Creative Movement  
   0881-253    Arts Management  
   0881-259    Creative Translation  
   0881-261    Audition Technique  
   0881-167    Dance Performance  
   0881-257    Introduction to Dramatic Literature  
Total Quarter Credit Hours 15

Performing arts (technical theater emphasis), certificate, typical course sequence (quarters)

CourseQtr. Cr. Hrs.
0881-298 Performing Arts Practicum 3
Choose four of the following: 12
   0881-256    Script Analysis  
   0881-222    Scenic Technology I  
   0881-223    Scenic Technology II  
   0881-224    Scene Painting  
   0881-231    Costume Technology I  
   0881-232    Costume Technology II  
   0881-233    Stage Make-up  
   0881-241    Lighting Technology I  
   0881-242    Lighting Technology II  
   0881-253    Arts Management  
   0881-272    Stage Management  
Total Quarter Credit Hours
15

Secondary Education of Students Who Are Deaf or Hard of Hearing

Semester Requirements

Gerald C. Bateman, Director
(585) 475-6776 (voice), (585) 286-4282 (VP), gcbnmp@rit.edu

http://www.rit.edu/NTID/msse

Program overview

The master of science degree in secondary education of students who are deaf or hard of hearing prepares students to meet the national need for teachers of secondary students who are deaf or hard of hearing. The program prepares teachers not only as effective and ethical practitioners but also as scholars and leaders in the profession.

[arrow] Click to view program requirements in the Quarter Calendar

Quarter Curriculum - For Reference Only

Effective fall 2013, RIT will convert its academic calendar from quarters to semesters. The following content has been made available as reference only. Currently matriculated students who began their academic programs in quarters should consult their academic adviser for guidance and course selection.

Program overview

The master of science degree in secondary education of students who are deaf or hard of hearing prepares students to meet the national need for teachers of secondary students who are deaf or hard of hearing. The program prepares teachers not only as effective and ethical practitioners but also as scholars and leaders in the profession.

Faculty members are international leaders in research and are highly skilled in the education of deaf people. A carefully designed system of faculty advisement is a prominent feature of the program. On-campus facilities, state-of-the-art technology, and a well-established system of educational access services combine to make this a vital program for both deaf and hearing students who desire careers as professional educators of deaf students. Graduates have a 96 percent pass rate on the New York State Teacher Certification examinations.

Curriculum

Secondary education for students who are deaf or hard of hearing, MS degree, typical course sequence (quarters)

CourseQtr. Cr. Hrs.
0835-700 History of Deaf Educational Thought 4
0835-701 Psychology and Sociology of Deaf Students 4
0835-702 Deaf Students: Educational and Cultural Diversity 4
0835-703 Special Education in the Social Context 4
0835-704 Teaching Deaf Learners with Secondary Disabilities 4
0835-705 Political/Legal Environment 4
0835-706 Educational Technology and Teaching 2
0835-712 Curriculum Content and Methods of Instruction 4
0835-713 Assessment 4
0835-721 Structure of American Sign Language 4
0835-722 Audition and Spoken Language: Application in Education 4
0835-723 Language Acquisition and Variation 4
0835-724 English Language Development 4
0835-790 Foundations of Educational Research 4
0835-820 Perspectives in Teaching Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing Students 2
0835-860 Student Teaching I§ 10
0835-861 Student Teaching II§ 10
0835-880 Master’s Project Seminar 2
0835-890 Master’s Project 8
0835-898 Special Topics variable
0835-999 Field Experience 0
  Professional Development Seminars 0
  American Sign Language* 8
Total Quarter Credit Hours
94

* Course placements and credit by exam for American Sign Language courses are determined by the department of American Sign Language and interpreting education.

§ Students are required to complete a minimum of 250 hours of supervised student teaching, working with deaf and hard-of-hearing students at the secondary (7–12 grade) level. In addition 100 hours of field experience are required before the first student teaching placement.

Degree requirements

Course work will require a minimum of six quarters. A cumulative GPA of at least 3.0 must be maintained. Before graduation, students are expected to have at least intermediate-level signing skills as determined by a Sign Language Proficiency Interview.

Admission requirements

To be considered for admission to the MS program in secondary education of students who are deaf or hard of hearing, candidates must fulfill the following requirements:

  • Hold a baccalaureate degree at an accredited college or university,
  • Have a cumulative grade-point average of 3.0 or higher,
  • Submit official transcripts (in English) of all previously completed undergraduate and graduate course work,
  • Have a basic knowledge of sign language as measured by a departmental skill assessment, or willingness to take American Sign Language I, or its equivalent, at NTID or another college prior to beginning the program,
  • Have a level of writing proficiency appropriate to graduate study as indicated by a review of undergraduate writing-intensive courses and an expository essay.
  • Submit letters of reference and an expository essay that indicates evidence of professional commitment and potential for success in the program,
  • Submit scores from Graduate Record Exam (GRE)
  • Participate in an individual interview, and
  • Complete a graduate application.
  • International applicants whose native language is not English must submit scores from the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL). Minimum scores of 550 (paper-based) or 213 (Internet-based) are required.

Additionally, 30 semester credit hours in a content area are required by the New York State Education Department for initial certification to teach a secondary (grades 7–12) content area. Students who do not have the required number of hours must complete the additional credits before applying for New York State certification. Secondary academic subjects include American Sign Language, English, mathematics, social studies, or science. Note: The social studies content area includes economics and government, and at least 21 semester hours in the history and geography of the United States and the world.

Additional information

4+2 education program

A 4+2 program designed specifically for RIT students who hope to become teachers of deaf and hard-of-hearing students was created as a bridge between the university's four-year bachelor’s degree programs and the two-year MS program in secondary education. Upon successful completion of a bachelor’s degree in an approved program with the required credits and GPA, students are guaranteed admission to the MS program.

Financial Aid

NTID tuition is approximately one-third of RIT's tuition. Approximately 60 percent of NTID’s full-time graduate students receive financial aid awards. A student’s need is determined by the analysis of the Free Application for Federal Students Aid (FAFSA). RIT has four general categories of financial aid: scholarships, grants, loans, and employment. RIT has grant funding available to address the financial need of all graduate students. Though funds are limited, RIT strives to meet as much of a student’s financial need as possible.

Students who pursue the MS program and plan to teach in the content areas of math or science upon graduation, may be eligible for a scholarship of up to $6,000 per year for two years. Up to 10 such scholarships are offered on an annual basis. Students who plan to teach other content areas such as English and social studies may be eligible for scholarships for up to $4,000 per year for two years.

All full-time students in the MS program are offered opportunities to work as graduate assistants with members of NTID faculty and staff. These paid positions range from teaching and research assistants to program assistants and tutors. Graduate assistants are required to work five hours per week and receive a stipend of $1,000 per quarter ($3,000 per academic year). There also are numerous on-campus student employment opportunities available.

Laboratory Science Technology

Semester Requirements

Matthew A. Lynn, Interim Chairperson
(585) 475-5923 (V), (585) 286-4751 (VP), malntm@rit.edu

http://www.ntid.rit.edu/scimath/laboratory-science-technology

Program overview

[arrow] Click to view program requirements in the Quarter Calendar

Quarter Curriculum - For Reference Only

Effective fall 2013, RIT will convert its academic calendar from quarters to semesters. The following content has been made available as reference only. Currently matriculated students who began their academic programs in quarters should consult their academic adviser for guidance and course selection.

Program overview

The laboratory science technology program was developed primarily from an industry perspective. The program prepares students for employment as laboratory technicians and includes a foundation of course sequences in chemistry, biology, and instrumental analysis. The program has several significant factors that set it apart, including the application of real-world analyses and a state-of-the-art instrumentation laboratory. Graduates are prepared to work in a broad range of fields, including chemical, biological, biotechnical, environmental, industrial, forensic, and food analysis.

Students earning an AAS degree have the option of finding employment or continuing to work toward a baccalaureate degree. Under the program’s agreement with the Division of Academic Affairs/Center for Multidisciplinary Studies, individuals who maintain a grade-point average of 3.0 or higher while in may enroll directly in the center's bachelor's degree program. Through this program students complete a BS degree in applied arts and science with a concentration in biotechnology studies. For more information visit www.rit.edu/lstAplusB.

On-the-job responsibilities

Technicians are involved with the collection and preparation of samples and standards. They also perform instrumental, volumetric, gravimetric, and biological analyses. Additional job responsibilities may include the interpretation and reporting of experimental results and data.

Places of employment

The program prepares graduates for technical jobs in municipal, public, private, and industrial laboratories.

Prerequisites

English—AAS: Placement in the College of Liberal Arts’ Writing Seminar (0502-227) course. Students typically enter Writing Seminar with reading scores equivalent to 10.0 on the California Reading Test. However, students who complete AAS degrees typically enter NTID with reading scores of 9.0 on the California Reading Test.

Mathematics: Placement in level C mathematics or higher. Typically, students entering this program will have completed at least three years of high school mathematics.

Science: Typically, students entering this program will have completed at least two years of high school science. Completion of high school chemistry recommended.

Curriculum

Semester conversion
Effective fall 2013, RIT will convert its academic calendar from quarters to semesters. Each program and its associated courses have been sent to the New York State Department of Education for approval of the semester plan. For reference, the following charts illustrate the typical course sequence for this program in both quarters and semesters. Students should consult their academic advisers with questions regarding planning and course selection.

Laboratory science technology, AAS degree, typical course sequence (quarters)

CourseQtr. Cr. Hrs.
First Year
0879-200 Introduction to Laboratory Science Technology 2
0885-215 Fundamentals of Cellular Biology 4
0885-205, 206 Fundamentals of Chemistry I, II 8
0502-227 Writing Seminar 4
0887-200 Freshman Seminar 2
0879-201, 202 Laboratory Science Technology Lab Applications I, II 4
0885-291 Principles of Analytical Chemistry 4
0884-212 Integrated Algebra 4
0884-231 Laboratory Math I 3
  Liberal Arts* 8
  Deaf Cultural Studies/ASL* 3
Second Year
0879-203, 204, 205 Laboratory Science Technology Lab Applications III, IV, V 6
0879-301, 302, 303 Instrumental Analysis I, II, III 10
0885-292 Principles of Organic Chemistry 4
0884-232 Laboratory Math II 3
0879-398 ST: Molecular Biology 4
0879-218 Introduction to Laboratory Science Technology Microbiology 3
0879-313 Chemical Technology 4
0879-314 Biotechnology 4
0806-101 Job Search Process 2
  Liberal Arts* 4
  Wellness Education† 0
0879-299 Cooperative Education Co-op
Third Year
0879-206 Laboratory Science Technology Lab Applications VI 2
0879-250 Senior Seminar 2
  Technical Elective‡ 3-4
  Liberal Arts* 4
  Capstone* 3
Total Quarter Credit Hours 104-105

* Please see NTID’s General Education Distribution Requirements chart for more information.

† Please see Wellness Education Requirement for more information.

‡ Students must choose one technical elective from the list of laboratory science technology courses or seek department approval for a course from another college.

Laboratory science technology, AAS degree, typical course sequence (semesters), effective fall 2013

CourseSem. Cr. Hrs.
First Year
NLST-120 Laboratory Tools 3
NLST-171 Fundamentals of Chemistry I 3
NSCI-161 LAS Perspective 6: Fundamentals of Biology I 3
NMTH-212 Integrated Algebra‡ 3
  LAS Foundation 1: First Year Seminar 3
  ASL/Deaf Cultural Studies†  
  LAS Perspective 1 3
NLST-172 Fundamentals of Chemistry II 3
NSCI-162 Fundamentals of Biology II 3
NLST-220 Analytical Chemistry 4
ENGL-150 LAS Foundation 2: Writing Seminar 3
  Wellness Education* 0
Second Year
NLST-250 Quantitative Instrumental Analysis 4
NLST-240 Biotechnology I 3
NLST-230 Principles of Organic Chemistry 4
NLST-225 Laboratory Applications 3
NLST-232 Laboratory Mathematics 3
NLST-255 Chemical Separations and Chromatography
NLST-245 Biotechnology II 3
NLST-235 Principles of Biochemistry 3
NLST-260  Laboratory Methods 3
  LAS Perspective 2 3
NLST-299 Cooperative Education Co-op
Third Year
  Professional/Technical Electives 6
  LAS Perspective 3, 4 6
Total Semester Credit Hours 76

Please see New NTID General Education Curriculum-Liberal Arts and Sciences (LAS) for more information.

* Please see Wellness Education Requirement for more information.

† A 3-credit ASL/Deaf Cultural Studies course, to be taken at NTID or another college of RIT; will count for RIT Gen Ed credit if it is simultaneously an RIT (non-NTID) Perspective Category course.

‡ Any mathematics course numbered NMTH-212 or higher.

Laboratory Science Technology

Semester Requirements

Matthew A. Lynn, Interim Chairperson
(585) 475-5923 (V), (585) 286-4751 (VP), malntm@rit.edu

http://www.ntid.rit.edu/scimath/laboratory-science-technology

Program overview

[arrow] Click to view program requirements in the Quarter Calendar

Quarter Curriculum - For Reference Only

Effective fall 2013, RIT will convert its academic calendar from quarters to semesters. The following content has been made available as reference only. Currently matriculated students who began their academic programs in quarters should consult their academic adviser for guidance and course selection.

Program overview

The laboratory science technology program was developed primarily from an industry perspective. The program prepares students for employment as laboratory technicians and includes a foundation of course sequences in chemistry, biology,and instrumental analysis. The program has several significant factors that set it apart, including the application of real-world analyses and a state-of-the-art instrumentation laboratory. Graduates are prepared to work in a broad range of fields, including chemical, biological, biotechnical, environmental, industrial, forensic, and food analysis.

On-the-job responsibilities

Technicians are involved with the collection and preparation of samples and standards. They also perform instrumental, volumetric, gravimetric, and biological analyses. Additional job responsibilities may include the interpretation and reporting of experimental results and data.

Places of employment

The program prepares graduates for technical jobs in municipal, public, private, and industrial laboratories.

Prerequisites

English—AOS: Placement in English level C or above. Students successfully completing AOS degrees typically enter with reading scores equivalent to 8.0 on the California Reading Test.

Mathematics: Placement in level C mathematics or higher. Typically, students entering this program will have completed at least three years of high school mathematics.

Science: Typically, students entering this program will have completed at least two years of high school science. Completion of high school chemistry recommended.

Curriculum

Semester conversion
Effective fall 2013, RIT will convert its academic calendar from quarters to semesters. Each program and its associated courses have been sent to the New York State Department of Education for approval of the semester plan. For reference, the following charts illustrate the typical course sequence for this program in both quarters and semesters. Students should consult their academic advisers with questions regarding planning and course selection.

Laboratory science technology, AOS degree, typical course sequence (quarters)

 

CourseQtr. Cr. Hrs.
First Year
0879-200 Introduction to Laboratory Science Technology 2
0885-215 Fundamentals of Cellular Biology 4
0885-205, 206 Fundamentals of Chemistry I, II 8
  English Level C 12
0887-200 Freshman Seminar 2
0879-201, 202 Laboratory Science Technology Lab Applications I, II 4
0885-291 Principles of Analytical Chemistry 4
0884-212 Integrated Algebra 4
0884-231 Laboratory Math I 3
  Wellness Education† 0
Second Year
0879-203, 204, 205 Laboratory Science Technology Lab Applications III, IV, V 6
0879-301, 302, 303 Instrumental Analysis I, II, III 10
0884-232 Laboratory Math II 3
0885-292 Principles of Organic Chemistry 4
0879-398 ST: Molecular Biology 4
0879-218 Introduction to Laboratory Science Technology Microbiology 3
0879-313 Chemical Technology 4
0879-314 Biotechnology 4
0806-101 Job Search Process 2
  Deaf Cultural Studies/ASL* 3
  Humanities* 3
  Social Sciences* 3
0879-299 Cooperative Education Co-op
Third Year
0879-206 Laboratory Science Technology Lab Applications VI 2
0879-250 Senior Seminar 2
  Technical Elective‡ 3-4
  Communication Studies* 3
  Capstone* 3
Total Quarter Credit Hours 105-106

* Please see NTID’s General Education Distribution Requirements chart for more information.

† Please see Wellness Education Requirement for more information.

‡ Students must choose one technical elective from the list of laboratory science technology courses or seek department approval for a course from another college.

Laboratory science technology, AOS degree, typical course sequence (semesters), effective fall 2013

CourseSem. Cr. Hrs.
First Year
NLST-120 Laboratory Tools 3
NLST-171 Fundamentals of Chemistry I 3
NSCI-161 NTID LAS Perspective: Fundamentals of Biology I 3
  NTID LAS Foundation-Mathematics† 3
NENG-212 NTID LAS Foundation: Career English I 3
NCAR-100 LAS Foundation 1: Freshman Seminar 1
Choose one of the following courses: 3
   NHSS-150    Deaf Perspectives on Contemporary Civilization  
   NASL-190    American Sign Language I  
NLST-172 Fundamentals of Chemistry II 3
NSCI-162 Fundamentals of Biology II 3
NLST-220 Analytical Chemistry 4
NENG-213 NTID LAS Foundation: Career English II 3
  Wellness Education* 0
Second Year
NLST-250 Quantitative Instrumental Analysis 4
NLST-240 Biotechnology I 3
NLST-230 Principles of Organic Chemistry 4
NLST-225 Laboratory Applications 3
NLST-232 Laboratory Mathematics 3
NLST-255 Chemical Separations and Chromatography
NLST-245 Biotechnology II 3
NLST-235 Principles of Biochemistry 3
NLST-260  Laboratory Methods 3
  NTID LAS Perspective: Communication, Social and Global Awareness 3
NLST-299 Cooperative Education Co-op
Third Year
  Professional/Technical Electives 6
  NTID LAS Perspective: Creative and Innovative Exploration 3
  NTID LAS Elective 3
Total Semester Credit Hours 77

Please see New NTID General Education Curriculum-Liberal Arts and Sciences (LAS) for more information.

* Please see Wellness Education Requirement for more information.

† Students may choose any mathematics course numbered NMTH-212 or higher.

Hospitality and Service Management

Semester Requirements

Mary Lou Basile, Chairperson
(585) 475-6460 (V/TTY), mlbnbt@rit.edu

http://www.ntid.rit.edu/businessstudies/asbs-hospitality

Program overview

The associate of science degree in hospitality and service management is an Associate+Bachelor’s degree program designed to prepare deaf and hard-of-hearing students to enter and successfully complete a baccalaureate program in the College of Applied Science and Technology’s School of International Hospitality and Service Innovation.

[arrow] Click to view program requirements in the Quarter Calendar

Quarter Curriculum - For Reference Only

Effective fall 2013, RIT will convert its academic calendar from quarters to semesters. The following content has been made available as reference only. Currently matriculated students who began their academic programs in quarters should consult their academic adviser for guidance and course selection.

Program overview

The associate of science degree in hospitality and service management is an Associate+Bachelor’s degree program designed to prepare deaf and hard-of-hearing students to enter and successfully complete a baccalaureate program in the College of Applied Science and Technology’s School of International Hospitality and Service Innovation.

Upon completion of the AS program with a minimum GPA of 2.5, students will enroll directly in the College of Applied Science and Technology, where they will pursue a bachelor’s degree in hospitality and service management. Students may choose one of two concentrations: hotel and resort management, or food management. Admission to this program is available for the fall quarter only.

Prerequisites

ACT: composite test score of 18 and above.

English: Placement into the College of Liberal Arts’ Writing Seminar (0502-227) course. Students who qualify for Written Communication II (0502-111) will be considered for admission if they are at level D or higher in mathematics.

Mathematics: Placement into level C mathematics course. Typically, students entering this program will have completed at least three years of high school mathematics.

Science: Placement into any level D science course numbered 0885-250 or higher. Typically, students entering this program will have completed at least two years of high school science.

Admission requirements

To enroll in the College of Applied Science and Technology’s School of International Hospitality and Service Innovation, the student must present a grade point average of 2.5 or higher upon graduation with the associate in science degree.

Curriculum

Semester conversion
Effective fall 2013, RIT will convert its academic calendar from quarters to semesters. Each program and its associated courses have been sent to the New York State Department of Education for approval of the semester plan. For reference, the following charts illustrate the typical course sequence for this program in both quarters and semesters. Students should consult their academic advisers with questions regarding planning and course selection.

Hospitality and service management (hotel and resort management concentration), AS degree, typical course sequence (quarters)

CourseQtr. Cr. Hrs.
First Year
0502-227 Writing Seminar 4
0887-200 Freshman Seminar 2
0884-210 Applications of Algebra 4
0622-200 Hotel Operations 4
0619-220 Survey of Service Management 2
0622-210 Hotel Marketing and Sales Management 4
0801-211, 212 Financial Accounting I, II 8
  NTID Science (Level D) 4
0619-221 Basic Computer Applications 2
0884-260 Explorations in College Algebra 4
  Liberal Arts* 4
0622-310 Resort Development and Management 4
1016-225 Algebra for Management Science 4
  Wellness Education† 0
Second Year
  Liberal Arts* 16
0801-221, 222 Managerial Accounting I, II 8
0511-211 Principles of Microeconomics 4
0622-315 Facility and Property Management 4
  Science with Lab‡ 4
0622-355 Financial Management for Hotels 4
1016-319 Data Analysis I 4
0804-286 Fundamentals of Marketing 3
0621-499 Cooperative Education Co-op
Total Quarter Credit Hours 97

* Please see NTID's General Education Distribution Requirements chart for more information.

† Please see Wellness Education Requirement for more information.

‡ Health Awareness (1026-221) or Medical Laboratory Procedures (1026-220) is recommended.

Hospitality and service management (hotel and resort management option), AS degree, typical course sequence (semesters), effective fall 2013

CourseSem. Cr. Hrs.
First Year
  LAS Foundation 1: First Year Seminar 3
NSCI-250 LAS Perspective 6† 3
HSPT-131 Hotel Management and Operations 3
HSPT-181 Principles of Food, Hotel and Tourism Operations 3
  LAS Perspective 1, 2 6
ENGL-150 LAS Foundation 2: Writing Seminar 3
  LAS Elective‡ 3
HSPT-232 Hospitality, Real Estate and Facilities Management 3
HSPT-284 Hospitality, Industry Sales and Marketing 3
  Cooperative Education Co-op
Second Year
  Professional/Technical Electives§ 6
HSPT-281 Service Management in a Global Economy 3
ECON-101 LAS Elective: Principles of Microeconomics 3
  LAS Perspective 3, 4 6
MATH-101 College Algebra 3
NACC-205 Financial Accounting 3
HSPT-235 International Destinations 3
HSPT-334 International Resort Management 3
  Wellness Education* 0
Total Semester Credit Hours 60

Please see New NTID General Education Curriculum-Liberal Arts and Sciences (LAS) for more information.

* Please see Wellness Education Requirement for more information.

† Any science course numbered NSCI-250 or higher

‡ Any mathematics course numbered NMTH-250 or higher

§ Choose a course from one of the following HSPT or FOOD program options: International Food Marketing and Distribution, International Hotel and Resort Management, and Entertainment and Event Management.

Hospitality and service management (food management concentration), AS degree, typical course sequence (quarters)

CourseQtr. Cr. Hrs.
First Year
0502-227 Writing Seminar 4
0887-200 Freshman Seminar 2
0884-210 Applications of Algebra 4
0621-225 Principles of Food Production 4
0619-220 Survey of Service Management 2
0884-260 Explorations in College Algebra 4
0801-211, 212 Financial Accounting I, II 8
  NTID Science (Level D) 4
0619-221 Basic Computer Applications 2
  Liberal Arts* 4
  Science with Lab‡ 4
0621-314 Sanitation and Safety 2
1016-225 Algebra for Management Science 4
  Wellness Education† 0
Second Year
  Liberal Arts* 16
0621-331 Restaurant Operations 6
0801-221, 222 Managerial Accounting I, II 8
0511-211 Principles of Microeconomics 4
0621-318 Food and Beverage Management 4
1016-319 Data Analysis I 4
0804-286 Fundamentals of Marketing 3
  HSM Program Elective 4
0621-499 Cooperative Education Co-op
Total Quarter Credit Hours 97

* Please see NTID's General Education Distribution Requirements chart for more information.

† Please see Wellness Education Requirement for more information.

‡ Health Awareness (1026-221) or Medical Laboratory Procedures (1026-220) is recommended.

Hospitality and service management (food and beverage management option), AS degree, typical course sequence (semesters), effective fall 2013

CourseSem. Cr. Hrs.
First Year
  LAS Foundation 1: First Year Seminar 3
NSCI-250 LAS Perspective 6† 3
FOOD-121 Principles of Food Production 3
HSPT-181 Principles of Food, Hotel and Tourism Operations 3
  LAS Perspective 1, 2 6
ENGL-150 LAS Foundation 2: Writing Seminar 3
  Mathematics‡ 3
FOOD-123 Sanitation and Safety 1
FOOD-223 Food and Beverage Management 3
HSPT-284 Hospitality Industry Sales and Marketing 3
  Cooperative Education Co-op
Second Year
  Professional/Technical Electives§ 6
HSPT-281 Service Management in a Global Economy 3
ECON-101 LAS Elective: Principles of Microeconomics 3
  LAS Perspective 3, 4 6
MATH-101 LAS Elective: College Algebra 3
NACC-205 Financial Accounting 3
FOOD-224 Serving Alcohol Safely 1
FOOD-226 Restaurant Operations 4
  Wellness Education* 0
Total Semester Credit Hours 60

Please see New NTID General Education Curriculum-Liberal Arts and Sciences (LAS) for more information.

* Please see Wellness Education Requirement for more information.

† Any science course numbered NSCI-250 or higher

‡ Any mathematics course numbered NMTH-250 or higher

§ Choose a course from one of the following HSPT or FOOD program options: International Food Marketing and Distribution, International Hotel and Resort Management, and Entertainment and Event Management. See chart below.

Program Electives

CourseSem. Cr. Hrs.
International Food Marketing and Distribution
FOOD-151 International Food Distribution 3
FOOD-454 Food Processing Quality and Integrity 3
PACK-301 Packaging Materials 3
International Hotel and Resort Management
HSPT-234 Negotiation and Conflict Resolutions 3
HSPT-336 International Risk Assessment and Hospitality Law 3
Entertainment and Event Management
HSPT-244 Meeting Event Management 3
HSPT-246 Casino Management 3
HSPT-248 Project Management for Events 3
HSPT-345 Venue Management 3
HSPT-234 Negotiation and Conflict Resolutions 3
HSPT-336  International Risk Assessment and Hospitality Law 3

Deaf Cultural Studies-American Sign Language

Semester Requirements

J. Matt Searls, Program Contact
(585) 475-5707, jmsdhd@rit.edu

http://www.rit.edu/NTID/ds

Program overview

The Deaf cultural studies-American Sign Language certificate offers deaf and hard-of-hearing students the opportunity to understand the deaf community as an entity unto itself and within the context of society as a whole.

[arrow] Click to view program requirements in the Quarter Calendar

Quarter Curriculum - For Reference Only

Effective fall 2013, RIT will convert its academic calendar from quarters to semesters. The following content has been made available as reference only. Currently matriculated students who began their academic programs in quarters should consult their academic adviser for guidance and course selection.

Program overview

The deaf cultural studies/American Sign Language certificate program offers deaf and hard-of-hearing students the opportunity to understand the deaf community as an entity unto itself and within the context of society as a whole. The program consists of two tracks: the advocacy and community track and the American Sign Language studies track.

Both tracks address the historical, anthropological, linguistic, literary, artistic, and multicultural aspects of deaf people’s lives. Knowledge, skills, and abilities learned through this program of study include: understanding the structure of ASL and the application of linguistic principles to other languages (specifically English); enhancement of bilingual skills to improve communication; increased knowledge of deaf culture and deaf history; a heightened sense of self-concept, self-esteem, and self-confidence; improved presentation skills; and enhanced literacy and critical thinking skills.

The advocacy and community track improves students’ ability to advocate for their rights in the workplace and contribute to leadership in the greater community. The ASL studies track enhances students’ marketability as teachers of ASL and deaf culture in the workplace, at schools, or within the greater community.

Candidates are granted the certificate upon successful completion of the course requirements in either of the tracks. Courses are offered as part of the NTID social sciences and humanities curricula. Applicants for the deaf cultural studies/American Sign Language certificate must be either matriculated students in good standing in an undergraduate degree program at RIT/NTID or graduates holding a degree from an RIT/NTID program. Introduction to Deaf Cultural Studies and ASL (0880-190) is a prerequisite for admission to the program.

Curriculum

Semester conversion
Effective fall 2013, RIT will convert its academic calendar from quarters to semesters. Each program and its associated courses have been sent to the New York State Department of Education for approval of the semester plan. For reference, the following charts illustrate the typical course sequence for this program in both quarters and semesters. Students should consult their academic advisers with questions regarding planning and course selection.

Deaf cultural studies-ASL (advocacy and community track), certificate, typical course sequence (quarters)

CourseQtr. Cr. Hrs.
0882-222 Deaf Culture and Community 3
0882-285 Civil Rights and Deaf People 3
0886-249 Structure of ASL 3
0880-207 Organizational Communication and the Deaf Employee 3
Total Quarter Credit Hours 12

Deaf cultural studies-ASL (American Sign Language studies track), certificate, typical course sequence (quarters)

CourseQtr. Cr. Hrs.
0882-222 Deaf Culture and Community 3
0886-249 Structure of ASL 3
0886-250 Introduction to ASL Teaching 3
Choose one of the following electives: 3
   0880-207    Organizational Communication and the Deaf Employee  
   0882-221    Deaf Heritage  
   0882-223    Deaf Women’s Studies  
   0882-285    Civil Rights and Deaf People  
Total Quarter Credit Hours 12

Deaf cultural studies-ASL, certificate, typical course sequence (semesters), effective fall 2013

CourseSem. Cr. Hrs.
Choose three of the following courses: 9
   NHSS-159    Deaf Community in the Modern World  
   NHSS-260    Deaf People and Civil Rights  
   NHSS-270    Multiculturalism in the Deaf Community  
   NASL-275    Structure of ASL  
   NHSS-269    Visual Expressions of Deafhood  
   NHSS-279    Seminar in Deaf Cultural Studies  
Total Semester Credit Hours 9