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National Technical Institute for the Deaf

Computer Integrated Machining Technology

Semester Requirements

Dino Laury, Chairperson
(585) 286-4613 (VP), dino@mail.rit.edu

http://www.ntid.rit.edu/engineering/cimt

Program overview

Students in the computer integrated machining technology major are prepared for employment in precision machining and/or precision optics manufacturing occupations. These include tool and die making, mold making, instrument making, manufacturing of optical elements, and computer numerical control machining (CNC). Graduates are successfully employed in both large manufacturing corporations and small contract manufacturing shops. In addition, graduates can continue their education in manufacturing and engineering technology programs.

[arrow] Click to view program requirements in the Quarter Calendar

Quarter Curriculum - For Reference Only

Effective fall 2013, RIT will convert its academic calendar from quarters to semesters. The following content has been made available as reference only. Currently matriculated students who began their academic programs in quarters should consult their academic adviser for guidance and course selection.

Program overview

Computer integrated machining technology students prepare for employment in precision machining and/or precision optics manufacturing occupations. These include tool and die making, mold making, instrument making, manufacturing of optical elements, and computer numerical control machining (CNC). Graduates are successfully employed in both large manufacturing corporations and small contract manufacturing shops. In addition, graduates can continue their education in manufacturing and engineering technology programs.

On-the-job responsibilities

Graduates will set up and operate lathes, milling machine tools, grinders, polishers, and computer numerical controlled machine tools; shape material into precision parts by conventional and nonconventional processes; follow blueprints; and use advanced measuring techniques to inspect work.

Places of employment

Graduates will find work in a variety of settings, including manufacturing, metal and/or precision optics manufacturing industries, engineering firms, and engineering research firms. Positions for which graduates qualify include entry-level and apprenticeship programs for positions such as a tool and die maker, instrument maker, mold maker, pattern maker, model maker, machinist, computer numerical control operator, or computer numerical control programmer trainee. Graduates who choose precision optics electives are also qualified for an entry-level position as a precision optics manufacturing technician. Graduates also work for companies that produce optical elements for a variety of applications.

Electives

Students have the option to choose a variety of electives. For a technical elective they can choose either Design, Dimensioning, and Tolerancing (0890-216) from the applied mechanical technology program or Physics I (0885-201); for an advanced technical elective: either CNC Toolpaths (0813-257) or Optical Testing (0813-242); and for a machining technical elective, either Automated Machining (0813-258) or Precision Optics Manufacturing II (0813-245).

It is strongly recommended that if a student selects 0813-257 as an advanced technical elective they take the machining elective of  0813-258. If a student chooses 0813-242, the advice is to proceed to 0813-245.

Prerequisites

Successful completion of a sampling experience either through the Summer Vestibule Program or an equivalent career exploration course is a prerequisite, as are the following:

English: Placement into English level C or above. Students successfully completing AOS degrees typically enter with reading scores equivalent to 8.0 on the California Reading Test.

Mathematics: Placement into Foundations of Algebra (0884-180) or a higher-level course. Typically, students entering this program will have completed at least three years of high school mathematics.

Science: Typically, students entering this program will have completed at least two years of high school science.

Curriculum

Semester conversion
Effective fall 2013, RIT will convert its academic calendar from quarters to semesters. Each program and its associated courses have been sent to the New York State Department of Education for approval of the semester plan. For reference, the following charts illustrate the typical course sequence for this program in both quarters and semesters. Students should consult their academic advisers with questions regarding planning and course selection.

Computer integrated machining technology, AOS degree, typical course sequence (quarters)

CourseQtr. Cr. Hrs.
First Year
0813-220 Engineering Fundamentals 4
0890-212 Computing Tools for Engineering Technology 4
0884-180 Foundations of Algebra 4
  English Level C 12
0887-200 Freshman Seminar 2
0813-222 Manufacturing Processes 4
0890-214 CAD Applications in Engineering Technology 4
0885-154 Physics of Matter 3
0813-231 Computer-Integrated Machining Technology 1 3
0813-250 Introduction to CNC 2
0813-255 Precision Measurement 2
0884-205 Trigonometry for Coordinate Analysis I 3
0813-239 Blueprint Reading 2
  Wellness Education† 0
Second Year
0813-232, 233, 234 Computer-Integrated Machining Technology 2, 3, 4 12
0813-252 CNC Graphics 3
0813-251 Industrial Materials 3
0884-206 Trigonometry for Coordinate Analysis II 3
0813-254 CNC Solids 3
0813-244 Precision Optics Manufacturing I 2
Choose one of the following technical electives: 3
   0885-201    Physics I  
   0890-216    Design, Dimensioning, and Tolerancing  
Choose one of the following advanced technical electives: 3
   0813-257    CNC Toolpaths  
   0813-242    Optical Testing  
0806-101 Job Search Process 2
  Communication Studies* 3
  Social Science* 3
  Deaf Cultural Studies/ASL* 3
0813-299 Cooperative Education Co-op
Third Year
Choose one of the following manufacturing technical electives: 6
   0813-258    Automated Machining  
   0813-245    Precision Optics Manufacturing II  
  Humanities* 3
0806-201 Employment Seminar 1
  Capstone* 3
Total Quarter Credit Hours 105

* Please see NTID's General Education Distribution Requirements chart for more information.

† Please see Wellness Education Requirement for more information.

Computer integrated machining technology, AOS degree, typical course sequence (semesters), effective fall 2013

CourseSem. Cr. Hrs.
First Year
NCIM-131 Computer-Integrated Machining Technology I 3
  Mathematics† 3
NENG-212 NTID LAS Foundation: Career English I 3
NCAR-100 Freshman Seminar 1
NCIM-101 Blueprint Reading I 3
NENG-213 NTID LAS Foundation: Career English II 3
NMTH-206 Trigonometry for Coordinate Analysis 3
NCIM-121 Precision Measurement I 3
NCIM-132 Computer-Integrated Machining Technology II 3
NCIM-102 Blueprint Reading II 3
Second Year
NCIM-233 Computer-Integrated Machining Technology III 3
NCIM-251 CNC I 3
NCIM-241 Precision Optics Manufacturing I 3
NSCI-200 NTID LAS Perspective-Scientific Processes: Physics of Light 3
NCIM-201 Job Search Process for CIMT 2
  Wellness Education* 0
  NTID LAS Foundation: ASL/Deaf Cultural Studies‡ 3
NCIM-234 Computer-Integrated Machining Technology IV 3
NCIM-252 CNC II 3
  Professional/Technical Electives 6
  NTID LAS Perspective: Creative and Innovative Exploration 3
  Cooperative Education Co-op
Third Year
NCIM-235 Computer-Integrated Machining Technology V 3
NCIM-236 Computer-Integrated Machining Technology V Lab 3
  NTID LAS Perspective: Communication, Social and Global Awareness 3
  NTID LAS Elective 3
NCIM-237 Precision Grinding 3
Total Semester Credit Hours 75

Please see New NTID General Education Curriculum-Liberal Arts and Sciences (LAS) for more information.

* Please see Wellness Education Requirement for more information.

† Any mathematics course numbered NMTH-180 or higher
‡ Deaf Perspectives on Contemporary Civilization ( NHSS-150) or ASL I (NASL-190)

Computer Aided Drafting Technology

Semester Requirements

Dino Laury, Chairperson
(585) 286-4613 (VP), dino@mail.rit.edu

http://www.rit.edu/NTID/cadt

Program overview

People who work in computer aided drafting technology use their skills to create two- and three-dimensional drawings on the computer. These drawings are used to visually represent buildings, bridges, canals, and houses. Computer aided drafting operators (technicians) take the sketches of an engineer, architect, or designer and produce a set of technical drawings.

[arrow] Click to view program requirements in the Quarter Calendar

Quarter Curriculum - For Reference Only

Effective fall 2013, RIT will convert its academic calendar from quarters to semesters. The following content has been made available as reference only. Currently matriculated students who began their academic programs in quarters should consult their academic adviser for guidance and course selection.

Program overview

People who work in computer aided drafting technology use their skills to create two- and three-dimensional drawings on the computer. These drawings are used to visually represent buildings, bridges, canals, and houses. Computer-aided drafting operators (technicians) take the sketches of an engineer, architect, or designer and produce a set of technical drawings.

In addition to a strong emphasis on computer-aided drafting, the program gives students a background in mathematics, building systems, construction regulations, site utilities, and materials and methods used in the architecture, engineering, and construction industries.

On-the-job responsibilities

Graduates will enter businesses and industries that need technical employees with skills in computer-aided drafting technology and a broad knowledge of applications and procedures. Graduates will work in architectural, engineering, or construction firms creating engineering drawings.

Places of employment

Graduates of this program will find work in a variety of settings, including engineering firms, government agencies, and architectural and construction firms. Positions for which graduates qualify include drafters/technicians for architectural, highway design, and civil environments.

Prerequisites

Successful completion of a sampling experience either through the Summer Vestibule Program or an equivalent career exploration course is a prerequisite, as are the following:

English: Placement into English level C or above. Students successfully completing an AOS degree typically enter with reading scores equivalent to 8.0 on the California Reading Test.

Mathematics: Placement into Foundations of Algebra (0884-180) or a higher-level course. Typically, students entering this program will have completed at least three years of high school mathematics.

Science: Placement into Physics of Matter (0885-154) or a higher-level course. Typically, students entering this program will have completed at least three years of high school science. High school physics would be beneficial.

Curriculum

Semester conversion
Effective fall 2013, RIT will convert its academic calendar from quarters to semesters. Each program and its associated courses have been sent to the New York State Department of Education for approval of the semester plan. For reference, the following charts illustrate the typical course sequence for this program in both quarters and semesters. Students should consult their academic advisers with questions regarding planning and course selection.

Computer aided drafting technology, AOS degree, typical course sequence (quarters)

CourseQtr. Cr. Hrs.
First Year
0813-220 Engineering Fundamentals 4
0890-212 Computing Tools for Engineering Technology 4
0884-180 Foundations of Algebra 4
0887-200 Freshman Seminar 2
  English Level C 12
0813-222 Manufacturing Processes 4
0890-214 CAD Applications in Engineering Technology 4
0884-212 Integrated Algebra 4
0890-210 Construction CAD I 4
0890-208 A/E/C Measuring Systems 2
0885-154 Physics of Matter 3
  Wellness Education† 0
Second Year
0890-220, 230 Construction CAD II, III 8
0890-255, 265 Construction Materials and Methods I, II 6
  Humanities* 3
0884-220 Elements of Trigonometry 4
0890-275 Principles of Structural Systems 3
  Communication Studies* 3
0806-101 Job Search Process 2
0890-310 Advanced Construction CAD 4
  Social Science* 3
  Technical Elective 3
0890-375 Construction Regulations 3
  Deaf Cultural Studies/ASL* 3
0890-299 Cooperative Education Co-op
Third Year
0890-320 Presentation Graphics 4
0890-280 GIS Fundamentals 3
0890-355 Site Utilities Mechanical/Electrical Systems 3
  Capstone* 3
Total Quarter Credit Hours 105

† Please see Wellness Education Requirement for more information.

* Please see NTID’s General Education Distribution Requirements chart for more information.

Computer aided drafting technology, AOS degree, typical course sequence (semesters), effective fall 2013

CourseSem. Cr. Hrs.
First Year
NCAD-112 Computing Tools for ET 3
NCAD-150 Engineering Graphics in AEC 3
NENG-212 NTID LAS Foundation: Career English I 3
  NTID LAS Foundation: ASL/Deaf Cultural Studies† 3
NMTH-212 NTID LAS Foundation-Math: Integrated Algebra 3
NCAR-100 Freshman Seminar 1
NCAD-170 Construction CAD I 3
NCAD-108 Data Collection and Analysis 3
NCAD-180 Civil Technology Graphics 3
NMTH-220 Trigonometry 3
NENG-213 NTID LAS Foundation: Career English II 3
  Wellness Education* 0
Second Year
NCAD-220 Construction CAD II 3
NCAD-255 Construction Materials and Methods I 3
NCAD-275 Principles of Structural Systems 3
NSCI-154 NTID LAS Perspective-Scientific Processes: Physics of Matter 3
NCAD-201 Job Search Process for CADT 3
  Wellness Education 0
NCAD-230 Construction CAD III 3
NCAD-265 Construction Materials and Methods II 3
NCAD-285 MEP Systems 3
NCAD-280 GIS Fundamentals 3
  NTID LAS Perspective: Communication, Social and Global Awareness 3
  Cooperative Education Co-op
Third Year
NCAD-240 Advanced Construction CAD 3
NCAD-250 Presentation Graphics 3
  Professional/Technical Elective‡ 3
  NTID LAS Perspective: Creative and Innovative Exploration 3
  NTID LAS Elective 3
Total Semester Credit Hours 76

Please see New NTID General Education Curriculum-Liberal Arts and Sciences (LAS) for more information.

* Please see Wellness Education Requirement for more information.

† Deaf Perspectives on Contemporary Civilization (NHSS-150) or American Sign Language I (NASL-190)

‡ Choose one from the following list of courses, or another course by departmental approval, Principles of Design and Color (NAIS-120), Raster and Vector Graphics (NHSS-223), Scenic and Lighting Technology (NHSS-233), Materials of Construction w/ Lab (CVET-140, 141), Surveying w/ Lab (CVET-160, 161). Permission required for CVET-140, 141 and CVET 160, 161.

Computer Aided Drafting Technology

Semester Requirements

Dino Laury, Chairperson
(585) 286-4613 (VP), dino@mail.rit.edu

http://www.rit.edu/NTID/cadt

Program overview

People who work in computer aided drafting technology use their skills to create two- and three-dimensional drawings on the computer. These drawings are used to visually represent buildings, bridges, canals, and houses. Computer-aided drafting operators (technicians) take the sketches of an engineer, architect, or designer and produce a set of technical drawings.

[arrow] Click to view program requirements in the Quarter Calendar

Quarter Curriculum - For Reference Only

Effective fall 2013, RIT will convert its academic calendar from quarters to semesters. The following content has been made available as reference only. Currently matriculated students who began their academic programs in quarters should consult their academic adviser for guidance and course selection.

Program overview

People who work in computer aided drafting technology use their skills to create two- and three-dimensional drawings on the computer. These drawings are used to visually represent buildings, bridges, canals, and houses. Computer-aided drafting operators (technicians) take the sketches of an engineer, architect, or designer and produce a set of technical drawings.

In addition to a strong emphasis on computer-aided drafting, the program provides students with a background in mathematics, building systems, construction regulations, site utilities, and materials and methods used in the architecture, engineering, and construction industries.

Students earning an AAS degree and satisfying the entry requirements in a specific major have the option of finding employment or continuing to work towards a baccalaureate degree. Transfer requirements vary by program.

On-the-job responsibilities

Graduates will enter businesses and industries that need technical employees with skills in computer drafting technology and a broad knowledge of applications and procedures. Graduates will work for architectural, engineering, or construction firms creating engineering drawings.

Places of employment

Graduates will find work in a variety of settings, including government agencies and architectural, construction, and engineering firms. Positions for which graduates qualify include drafters/technicians for architectural, highway design, and civil environments.

Prerequisites

English: Placement in the College of Liberal Arts’ Writing Seminar (0502-227) course. Students typically enter Writing Seminar with reading scores equivalent to 10.0 on the California Reading Test. However, students who complete AAS degrees typically enter NTID with reading scores equivalent to 9.0 on the California Reading Test.

Mathematics: Placement in Integrated Algebra (0884-212). Typically, students entering this program will have completed at least three years of high school mathematics.

Science: Placement into Physics I (0885-201) or a higher-level course. Typically, students entering this program will have completed at least three years of high school science. High school physics would be beneficial.

Curriculum

Semester conversion
Effective fall 2013, RIT will convert its academic calendar from quarters to semesters. Each program and its associated courses have been sent to the New York State Department of Education for approval of the semester plan. For reference, the following charts illustrate the typical course sequence for this program in both quarters and semesters. Students should consult their academic advisers with questions regarding planning and course selection.

Computer aided drafting technology, AAS degree, typical course sequence (quarters)

CourseQtr. Cr. Hrs.
First Year
0813-220 Engineering Fundamentals 4
0890-212 Computing Tools for Engineering Technology 4
0884-212 Integrated Algebra 4
0887-200 Freshman Seminar 2
0813-222 Manufacturing Processes 4
0890-214 CAD Applications in Engineering Technology 4
0884-220 Elements of Trigonometry 4
0502-227 Writing Seminar 4
0890-210 Construction CAD I 4
0890-208 A/E/C Measuring Systems 2
0885-201 Physics I 4
  Liberal Arts* 4
  Wellness Education† 0
Second Year
0890-220, 230 Construction CAD II, III 8
0890-255, 265 Construction Materials and Methods I, II 6
0884-275 Advanced Math 4
  Liberal Arts* 12
0890-275 Principles of Structural Systems 3
0806-101 Job Search Process 2
0890-310 Advanced Construction CAD 4
  Technical Elective 3
0890-375 Construction Regulations 3
0890-299 Cooperative Education Co-op
Third Year
0890-320 Presentation Graphics 4
  Deaf Cultural Studies/ASL* 3
0890-280 GIS Fundamentals 3
0890-355 Site Utilities Mechanical/Electrical Systems 3
  Capstone* 3
Total Quarter Credit Hours 105

* Please see NTID's General Education Distribution Requirements chart for more information.

† Please see Wellness Education Requirement for more information.

Computer aided drafting technology, AAS degree, typical course sequence (semesters), effective fall 2013

CourseSem. Cr. Hrs.
First Year
  ASL/Deaf Cultural Studies†  
NCAD-112 Computing Tools for ET 3
NCAD-150 Engineering Graphics in AEC 3
  LAS Perspective 1 3
  LAS Foundation 1: First Year Seminar 3
NMTH-220 LAS Elective: Trigonometry 3
NCAD-170 Construction CAD I 3
NCAD-108 Data Collection and Analysis 3
NCAD-180 Civil Technology Graphics 3
NMTH-275 Advanced Mathematics 3
ENGL-150 LAS Foundation 2: Writing Seminar 3
  Wellness Education* 0
Second Year
NCAD-220 Construction CAD II 3
NCAD-255 Construction Materials and Methods I 3
NCAD-275 Principles of Structural Systems 3
NSCI-201 LAS Perspective 6: Principles of Physics 3
NCAD-201 Job Search Process for CADT 3
  Wellness Education 0
NCAD-230 Construction CAD III 3
NCAD-265 Construction Materials and Methods II 3
NCAD-285 MEP Systems 3
NCAD-280 GIS Fundamentals 3
  LAS Perspective 2 3
  Cooperative Education Co-op
Third Year
NCAD-240 Advanced Construction CAD 3
NCAD-250 Presentation Graphics 3
  Professional/Technical Elective‡ 3
  LAS Perspective 3, 4 6
Total Semester Credit Hours 75

Please see New NTID General Education Curriculum-Liberal Arts and Sciences (LAS) for more information.

* Please see Wellness Education Requirement for more information.

† A 3-credit ASL/Deaf Cultural Studies course, to be taken at NTID or another college of RIT; will count for RIT Liberal Arts General Education credit if it is simultaneously an RIT (non-NTID) perspective course.

‡ Choose one from the following list of courses, or another course by departmental approval, Principles of Design and Color (NAIS-120), Raster and Vector Graphics (NHSS-223), Scenic and Lighting Technology (NHSS-233), Materials of Construction w/ Lab (CVET-140, 141), Surveying w/ Lab (CVET-160, 161). Permission required for CVET-140, 141 and CVET 160, 161.

Business Technology

Semester Requirements

Mary Lou Basile, Chairperson
(585) 475-6460 (V/TTY), mlbnbt@rit.edu

http://www.rit.edu/NTID/bustech

Program overview

The business technology AOS degree program includes technical course work in accounting, computers, payroll, general office skills, and word processing/information processing skills. Students complete a sequence of courses that provides either an accounting technology or administrative support technology concentration.

This is a nontransfer occupational program, with primary emphasis on preparation for immediate employment.

[arrow] Click to view program requirements in the Quarter Calendar

Quarter Curriculum - For Reference Only

Effective fall 2013, RIT will convert its academic calendar from quarters to semesters. The following content has been made available as reference only. Currently matriculated students who began their academic programs in quarters should consult their academic adviser for guidance and course selection.

Program overview

The business technology AOS degree program includes technical course work in accounting, computers, payroll, general office skills, and word processing/information processing skills. Students complete a sequence of courses that provides either an accounting technology or administrative support technology concentration.

This is a nontransfer occupational program, with primary emphasis on preparation for immediate employment.

Places of employment

Graduates of this program will find employment in a variety of settings, including business, industry, government, and education.

On-the-job responsibilities

Graduates will input, manipulate, and retrieve data; use interactive software, e-mail, and information processing skills; and use computers to maintain and reconcile various financial records. Positions for which graduates qualify include general office clerk, accounts receivable/payables clerk, payroll records clerk, word processing technician, cost accounting clerk, and microcomputer accounting clerk.

Prerequisites

English: Placement into English level C or above. Students successfully completing AOS degrees typically enter with reading scores equivalent to 8.0 on the California Reading Test.

Mathematics: Mathematics Applications for Business Technology (0884-155) is required. Typically, students entering this program will have completed at least two years of high school mathematics.

Science: Typically, students entering this program will have completed at least two years of high school science.

Curriculum

Semester conversion
Effective fall 2013, RIT will convert its academic calendar from quarters to semesters. Each program and its associated courses have been sent to the New York State Department of Education for approval of the semester plan. For reference, the following charts illustrate the typical course sequence for this program in both quarters and semesters. Students should consult their academic advisers with questions regarding planning and course selection.

Business technology, AOS degree, typical course sequence (quarters)

CourseQtr. Cr. Hrs.
First Year
0801-201, 202 Accounting I, II 8
0804-101 Orientation to Business 3
0804-110 Business English 3
0804-111 Keyboarding 2
0804-112 OAS Formatting 3
0804-113 OAS Document Production I 4
0804-211 Records Management/Business Calculations 3
0804-212 Payroll/Spreadsheet Applications 3
  Mathematics requirement§ 3
0887-200 Freshman Seminar 2
  English Level C 12
  Wellness Education† 0
Second Year
0801-203 Accounting III 4
Choose one of the following: 4-8
   0801-252, 253    Cost Accounting I, II‡  
   0804-304    Database Applications for Business**  
0804-230 Administrative Support Technology Seminar** 3
0804-221 OAS Document Production II 4
0804-284 Fundamentals of Management 3
0804-286 Fundamentals of Marketing 3
0804-302 Advanced Applications for Word Processing 4
0804-303 Business Graphics 4
  Humanities* 3
  Science (Level B) 3
  Communication Studies* 3
0806-101 Job Search Process 2
  Deaf Cultural Studies/ASL* 3
0805-211 Web Development for Business** 3
0804-299 Cooperative Education Co-op
Third Year
Choose one of the following: 2-3
   0801-260    Applied Accounting Techniques‡  
   0804-310    Desktop Publishing for Business**  
0804-291 Applied Business Techniques 2
0806-201 Employment Seminar 1
0882-242 Law and Society 3
  Social Science* 3
  Capstone* 3
Total Quarter Credit Hours 104/107

* Please see NTID's General Education Distribution Requirements chart for more information.

† Please see Wellness Education Requirement for more information.

‡ Courses required for accounting technology option.

§ Mathematics Applications for Business Technology (0884-155) is required.

** Courses required for administrative support technology option.

Business technology (administrative support technology option), AOS degree, typical course sequence (semesters), effective fall 2013

CourseSem. Cr. Hrs.
First Year
NCAR-100 Freshman Seminar 1
NENG-212 NTID LAS Foundation: Career English I 3
NAST-140 Essential Document Production 3
NACC-130 Personal Finance 3
NAST-160 Spreadsheet Applications for Business 3
NENG-213 NTID LAS Foundation: Career English II 3
NMTH-120 NTID LAS Foundation: Mathematics† 3
NAST-150 Advanced Document Production 3
NBUS-200 Orientation to Business 3
NACC-201 Accounting I 3
  Wellness Education* 0
Second Year
  NTID LAS Foundation: ASL/Deaf Cultural Studies‡ 3
NAST-215 Integrated Document Production 3
NAST-210 Essentials of Business Communication 3
NAST-220 Database Applications for Business 3
NBUS-213 Applied Ethics for Business 3
  NTID LAS Perspective: Communication, Social and Global Awareness 3
NSCI-120 NTID LAS Perspective: Scientific Processes§ 3
NAST-225 Business Graphics 3
NBUS-217 Fundamentals of Management 3
NAST-240 Administrative Support Technology Seminar 3
  Cooperative Education Co-op
Third Year
  NTID LAS Perspective: Creative and Innovative Exploration 3
  NTID LAS Elective 3
NAST-230 Desktop Publishing for Business 3
NBUS-223 Fundamentals of Marketing 3
  Free Elective 3
Total Semester Credit Hours 73

Please see New NTID General Education Curriculum-Liberal Arts and Sciences (LAS) for more information.

* Please see Wellness Education Requirement for more information.

† Any mathematics course numbered NMTH-120 or higher

‡ Deaf Perspectives on Contemporary Civilization (NHSS-150) or ASL I (NASL-190)

§ Any science course numbered NSCI-120 or higher

Business technology (accounting technology option), AOS degree, typical course sequence (semesters), effective fall 2013

CourseSem. Cr. Hrs.
First Year
NCAR-100 Freshman Seminar 1
NENG-212 NTID LAS Foundation: Career English I 3
NAST-140 Essential Document Production 3
NACC-130 Personal Finance 3
NAST-160 Spreadsheet Applications for Business 3
NENG-213 NTID LAS Foundation: Career English II 3
NMTH-120 NTID LAS Foundation: Mathematics† 3
NAST-150 Advanced Document Production 3
NBUS-200 Orientation to Business 3
NACC-201 Accounting I 3
  Wellness Education* 0
Second Year
  NTID LAS Foundation: ASL/Deaf Cultural Studies‡ 3
NAST-215 Integrated Document Production 3
NAST-210 Essentials of Business Communication 3
NAST-220 Database Applications for Business 3
NACC-202 Accounting 2 3
  NTID LAS Perspective: Communication, Social and Global Awareness 3
NSCI-120 NTID LAS Perspective: Scientific Processes§ 3
NBUS-213 Applied Ethics for Business 3
NBUS-217 Fundamentals of Management 3
NACC-203 Accounting 3 3
  Cooperative Education Co-op
Third Year
  NTID LAS Perspective: Creative and Innovative Exploration 3
  NTID LAS Elective 3
NACC-204 Accounting Capstone 3
NBUS-223 Fundamentals of Marketing 3
  Free Elective 3
Total Semester Credit Hours 73

Please see New NTID General Education Curriculum-Liberal Arts and Sciences (LAS) for more information.

* Please see Wellness Education Requirement for more information.

† Any mathematics course numbered NMTH-120 or higher

‡ Deaf Perspectives on Contemporary Civilization (NHSS-150) or ASL I (NASL-190)

§ Any science course numbered NSCI-120 or higher

Additional information

Microsoft certification

The department operates an authorized testing center for Microsoft Office Specialist. Preparatory courses are offered for several exams each quarter.

Business

Semester Requirements

Mary Lou Basile, Chairperson
(585) 475-6460 (V/TTY), mlbnbt@rit.edu

http://www.rit.edu/NTID/busAplusB

Program overview

[arrow] Click to view program requirements in the Quarter Calendar

Quarter Curriculum - For Reference Only

Effective fall 2013, RIT will convert its academic calendar from quarters to semesters. The following content has been made available as reference only. Currently matriculated students who began their academic programs in quarters should consult their academic adviser for guidance and course selection.

Program overview

The AS degree in business is an Associate+Bachelor’s degree program designed to prepare deaf and hard-of-hearing students to enter and successfully complete a bachelor’s degree program in the E. Philip Saunders College of Business, which offers a portfolio of comprehensive programs designed to prepare students for leadership in the business environment. The Saunders College is accredited by the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business International, the premier accrediting organization for business schools.

Upon completion of the AS program, students with a minimum GPA of 2.5 will enroll directly in the Saunders College, where they complete their bachelor’s degree in accounting, finance, international business, management, management information systems, marketing, or new media marketing. Admission to this program is available during the fall quarter only.

Prerequisites

ACT: composite test score of 18 and above.

English: Placement into the College of Liberal Arts’ Writing Seminar (0502-227) course. Students who qualify for Written Communication II (0502-111) will be considered for admission if they are at level D or higher in mathematics.

Mathematics: Placement into level C mathematics course. Typically, students entering this program will have completed at least three years of high school mathematics.

Science: Placement into any level D science course numbered 0885-250 or higher. Typically, students entering this program will have completed at least two years of high school science.

Admission requirements

To enroll in one of the bachelor degree programs in the E. Philip Saunders College of Business, students must have a minimum grade-point average of 2.5 upon graduation with the AS degree in business.

Semester conversion
Effective fall 2013, RIT will convert its academic calendar from quarters to semesters. Each program and its associated courses have been sent to the New York State Department of Education for approval of the semester plan. For reference, the following charts illustrate the typical course sequence for this program in both quarters and semesters. Students should consult their academic advisers with questions regarding planning and course selection.

Business, AS degree, typical course sequence (quarters)

CourseQtr. Cr. Hrs.
First Year
0884-210 Applications of Algebra‡ 4
0884-250 Science (Level D or above) 4
0804-101 Orientation to Business 3
0887-200 Freshman Seminar 2
  Liberal Arts* 4
0502-227 Writing Seminar 4
0884-260 Explorations in College Algebra 4
0801-211, 212 Financial Accounting I, II 8
0804-284 Fundamentals of Management 3
1016-225 Algebra for Management Science 4
0112-270 Business Software Applications 2
  Wellness Education† 0
Second Year
  Liberal Arts* 16
1016-226 Calculus for Management Science 4
0801-221, 222 Managerial Accounting I, II 8
  Laboratory Science 4
0535-352 Professional Communication for Business 4
0511-211 Principles of Microeconomics§ 4
0511-402 Principles of Macroeconomics** 4
0112-315 Business Information Systems 4
0804-286 Fundamentals of Marketing 3
Total Quarter Credit Hours 93

* Please see NTID's General Education Distribution Requirements chart for more information.

† Please see Wellness Education Requirement for more information.

‡ Entering students who have the math proficiency to waive this course may take Explorations in College Algebra (0884-260).

§ Principles of Microeconomics (0511-211) is a social science course in the College of Liberal Arts. However, for students in the E. Philip Saunders College of Business, it is a required professional course. Therefore, graduates of this AS program who transfer to the E. Philip Saunders College will be required to take an additional College of Liberal Arts lower-division social science course to fulfill College of Liberal Arts General Education requirements. Principles of Microeconomics will be allocated to the business core in the E. Philip Saunders College of Business.

**Principles of Macroeconomics (0511-402) is a course in the E. Philip Saunders College of Business and is not allocated to the College of Liberal Arts distribution requirements.

Business, AS degree, typical course sequence (semesters), effective fall 2013

CourseSem. Cr. Hrs.
First Year
  LAS Foundation 1: First Year Seminar 3
MGIS-101 Computer Based Analysis 1
  LAS Perspective 6† 3
STAT-145 Introduction to Statistics I 3
NBUS-211 World of Business and Innovation 3
  LAS Perspective 1, 2 6
ENGL-150 LAS Foundation 2: Writing Seminar 3
NACC-205 Financial Accounting 3
STAT-146 Introduction to Statistics II 4
NBUS-225 Introduction to Entrepreneurship 3
  Wellness Education* 0
Second Year
NACC-206 Managerial Accounting 3
COMM-253 Communication 3
ECON-101 Principles of Microeconomics 3
  LAS Perspective 3, 4 6
INTB-225 Globalization 3
MATH-161 LAS Elective: Applied Calculus 4
NBUS-227 Principles of Marketing 3
MGMT-215 Organizational Behavior 3
ECON-201 Principles of Macroeconomics 3
Total Semester Credit Hours 63

Please see New NTID General Education Curriculum-Liberal Arts and Sciences (LAS) for more information.

* Please see Wellness Education Requirement for more information.

† Any science course numbered NSCI-250 or higher may fulfill this requirement.

Additional information

Microsoft certification

As an authorized testing center for Microsoft Office Specialist, preparatory courses are offered for several exams each quarter.

ASL-English Interpretation

Semester Requirements

Kim Brown Kurz, Chairperson
(585) 286-5511 (VP), kbknss@rit.edu

http://www.rit.edu/NTID/aslie

Program overview

On-the-job responsibilities

The ASL-English interpretation major prepares entry-level sign language interpreters for work in settings where deaf, hard-of-hearing, and hearing people interact and communicate. The degree allows students to develop foundation skills.

Places of employment

Graduates will find entry work in a variety of settings, including elementary, secondary, and post-secondary educational institutions; community service organizations; vocational rehabilitation agencies; business/industry; and government agencies.

[arrow] Click to view program requirements in the Quarter Calendar

Quarter Curriculum - For Reference Only

Effective fall 2013, RIT will convert its academic calendar from quarters to semesters. The following content has been made available as reference only. Currently matriculated students who began their academic programs in quarters should consult their academic adviser for guidance and course selection.

Program overview

On-the-job responsibilities

The program in ASL-English interpretation prepares entry-level sign language interpreters for work in settings where deaf, hard-of-hearing, and hearing people interact and communicate. The degree allows students to develop foundation skills.

Places of employment

Graduates will find entry work in a variety of settings, including elementary, secondary, and post-secondary educational institutions; community service organizations; vocational rehabilitation agencies; business/industry; and government agencies.

Admission requirements

In addition to RIT’s general admissions procedures, the ASL-English interpretation program requires applicants to complete admission materials from the NTID Admissions Office.

Academic preparation

Direct entry to the associate degree option is available for students who demonstrate proficiency at the ASL III level (0875-203) and are ready to enter ASL IV (0875-301) (see course descriptions). It is strongly recommended that applicants possess a BS degree. (Note: Candidates for national interpreter certification must possess a baccalaureate degree.) For those applicants who have had college experience, college transcripts should document a GPA of 3.0 or better, with evidence of very good performance in English courses. A writing sample will be judged on vocabulary, grammar, structure, style, and creativity.

To succeed in this program, students must be able to understand a speaker who is behind them; understand a speaker who is far away; focus on what a speaker is saying in a noisy room; and understand recorded voices through headphones. To see a list of the major skills and abilities needed to study sign language interpreting, please visit the section “Is Interpreting the Career for Me?” on our website.

Curriculum

Semester conversion
Effective fall 2013, RIT will convert its academic calendar from quarters to semesters. Each program and its associated courses have been sent to the New York State Department of Education for approval of the semester plan. For reference, the following charts illustrate the typical course sequence for this program in both quarters and semesters. Students should consult their academic advisers with questions regarding planning and course selection.

ASL-English interpretation, AAS degree, typical course sequence (quarters)

CourseQtr. Cr. Hrs.
First Year
0875-301, 302, 303 American Sign Language IV, V, VI 12
0875-213 Introduction to the Field of Interpreting 4
0875-300 Intermediate Fingerspelling and Number Skills Development 4
0875-311 Processing Skills Development 4
0875-212 Deaf Culture and Community 4
  Liberal Arts* 20
  Mathematics/Science‡ 8
1105-051, 052 First-Year Enrichment I, II 2
  Wellness Education† 0
Second Year
0875-316, 326 ASL to English Interpreting I, II 8
0875-315, 325 English to ASL Interpreting I, II 8
0875-320 Practical and Ethical Applications 4
0875-400 Interactive Interpreting 4
  Interpreting Elective 4
  Liberal Arts* 4
0875-350 Practicum Seminar I 4
Total Quarter Credit Hours 94

* Please see Liberal Arts General Education Requirements for more information.

† Please see Wellness Education Requirement for more information.

‡ Please see the Mathematics and Science General Education Curriculum for more information.

ASL-English interpretation, AS degree, typical course sequence (semesters), effective fall 2013

CourseSem. Cr. Hrs.
First Year
INTP-210 Introduction to the Field of Interpreting 3
INTP-225 American Sign Language IV 3
  LAS Foundation 1: First Year Seminar 3
  LAS Perspective 1, 2, 3 9
INTP-215 Processing Skills Development 3
INTP-220 Discourse Analysis 3
INTP-226 American Sign Language V 3
ENGL-150 LAS Foundation 2: Writing Seminar 3
  Wellness Education* 0
Second Year
INTP-310 Interpreting I 3
INTP-315 Practical and Ethical Applications 3
INTP-325 American Sign Language VI 3
  LAS Perspective 4, 6 6
INTP-326 American Sign Language VII 3
INTP-335 Interpreting II: English to ASL 3
INTP-336 Interpreting II: ASL to English 3
INTP-350 Practicum and Seminar I 3
  LAS Elective: Mathematics 3

Total Semester Credit Hours

60

Please see New NTID General Education Curriculum-Liberal Arts and Sciences (LAS) for more information.

* Please see Wellness Education Requirement for more information.

ASL-English Interpretation

Semester Requirements

Kim Brown Kurz, Chairperson
(585) 286-5511 (VP), kbknss@rit.edu

http://www.rit.edu/NTID/aslie

Program overview

On-the-job responsibilities

The BS degree program in ASL-English interpretation prepares sign language interpreters for work in settings where deaf, hard-of-hearing, and hearing people interact and communicate. This degree allows students to develop foundation skills for general interpreting, with opportunities to explore specialized fields such as those in educational and medical settings, and/or community interpreting.

[arrow] Click to view program requirements in the Quarter Calendar

Quarter Curriculum - For Reference Only

Effective fall 2013, RIT will convert its academic calendar from quarters to semesters. The following content has been made available as reference only. Currently matriculated students who began their academic programs in quarters should consult their academic adviser for guidance and course selection.

Program overview

On-the-job responsibilities

The BS degree program in ASL-English interpretation prepares sign language interpreters for work in settings where deaf, hard-of-hearing, and hearing people interact and communicate. This degree allows students to develop foundation skills for general interpreting, with opportunities to explore specialized fields such as those in educational and medical settings, and/or community interpreting.

Places of employment

Graduates will find work in a variety of settings, including elementary, secondary, and post-secondary educational institutions; community service organizations; hospitals or clinics; vocational rehabilitation agencies; business/industry; and government agencies.

Admission requirements

In addition to RIT’s general admissions procedures, the ASL-English interpretation program requires applicants to complete admission materials from the NTID Admissions Office.

Academic preparation

Applicants are required to have at least a high school diploma or equivalent. High school preparation should include a college preparatory program with a minimum of four years of English (with a minimum of a B average), three years of science and mathematics, and two years of a foreign language.

Applicants must demonstrate beginning ASL competency.

The middle 50 percent of accepted NTID applicants possess SAT scores of 1530-1940. Equivalent ACT composite scores are 22-29. Both SAT and ACT tests may be submitted.

For those applicants who have had college experience, college transcripts should document a GPA of 3.0 or better, with evidence of very good performance in English courses. A writing sample will be judged on vocabulary, grammar, structure, style, and creativity.

To succeed in this program, students must be able to understand a speaker who is behind them; understand a speaker who is far away; focus on what a speaker is saying in a noisy room; and understand recorded voices through headphones. To see a list of the major skills and abilities needed to study sign language interpreting, please visit the section “Is Interpreting the Career for Me?” on our website.

Curriculum

Semester conversion
Effective fall 2013, RIT will convert its academic calendar from quarters to semesters. Each program and its associated courses have been sent to the New York State Department of Education for approval of the semester plan. For reference, the following charts illustrate the typical course sequence for this program in both quarters and semesters. Students should consult their academic advisers with questions regarding planning and course selection.

ASL-English interpretation, BS degree, typical course sequence (quarters)

CourseQtr. Cr. Hrs.
First Year
0875-201, 202, 203 American Sign Language I, II, III 12
1105-051, 052 First-Year Enrichment I, II 2
  Mathematics/Science† 12
  Liberal Arts* 20
  General Education Elective 4
Second Year
0875-301, 302, 303 American Sign Language IV, V, VI 12
0875-213 Introduction to the Field of Interpreting 4
  Mathematics/Science† 8
  General Education Electives 12
  Liberal Arts* 4
0875-311 Processing Skills Development 4
0875-212 Deaf Culture and Community 4
  Wellness Education‡ 0
Third Year
0875-315, 325 English to ASL Interpreting I, II 8
0875-316, 326 ASL to English Interpreting I, II 8
  Liberal Arts Concentration 12
0875-320 Practical and Ethical Applications 4
0875-400 Interactive Interpreting 4
  General Education Electives 4
  Interpreting Electives 8
  Wellness Education‡ 0
Fourth Year
0875-501 English to ASL Interpreting III 4
0875-502 ASL to English Interpreting III 4
  Free Electives 12
0875-350, 510 Practicum and Seminar I, II 8
0875-520 Issues in Interpreting 4
  General Education Electives 6
Total Quarter Credit Hours 184

* Please see Liberal Arts General Education Requirements for more information.

† Please see the Mathematics and Science General Education Curriculum for more information.

‡ Please see Wellness Education Requirement for more information.

ASL-English interpretation, BS degree, typical course sequence (semesters), effective fall 2013

CourseSem. Cr. Hrs.
First Year
INTP-125 American Sign Language II 4
  LAS Foundation 1: First-Year Seminar 3
  LAS Perspective 1, 2, 3, 4, 7A, 7B 18
INTP-126 American Sign Language III 4
ENGL-150 LAS Foundation 2: Writing Seminar 3
  Wellness Education* 0
Second Year
INTP-210 Introduction to the Field of Interpreting 3
INTP-225 American Sign Language IV 3
  Deaf Cultural Studies Elective 3
  LAS Elective 3
  LAS Perspective 5†, 6 7
INTP-215 Processing Skills Development 3
INTP-220 Discourse Analysis 3
INTP-226 American Sign Language V 3
  Deaf Cultural Studies Elective 3
Third Year
INTP-325 American Sign Language VI 3
INTP-310 Interpreting I 3
INTP-315 Practical and Ethical Applications 3
  LAS Elective 3
  Free Elective 3
INTP-326 American Sign Language VII 3
INTP-335 Interpreting II: English to ASL 3
INTP-336 Interpreting II: ASL to English 3
  Professional/Technical Elective 3
  LAS Immersion 1 3
Fourth Year
INTP-435 Interpreting III: English to ASL 3
INTP-436 Interpreting III: ASL to English 3
INTP-350 Practicum and Seminar I 3
  Professional/Technical Elective 3
  LAS Immersion 2, 3 6
INTP-440 Transliteration 3
INTP-450 Practicum and Seminar II 3
INTP-460 Issues in Interpreting (WI) 3
  Free Elective 3
Total Semester Credit Hours 123

Please see New NTID General Education Curriculum-Liberal Arts and Sciences (LAS) for more information.

(WI) refers to writing intensive course within the major.

* Please see Wellness Education Requirement for more information.

† Students will satisfy this requirement by taking a 4-credit hour lab science course. Students may select one of the lab science courses listed below to fulfill this requirement. Both the lecture and the laboratory sections must be taken. Human Biology I (BIOG-101) and Human Biology Lab 1 (BIOG-103), Human Biology II (BIOG-102) and Human Biology Lab II (BIOG-104), Field Biology (BIOG-110), General Biology I (BIOL-101) and General Biology Lab I (BIOL-103), General Biology II (BIOL-102) and General Biology Lab II (BIOL-104), Introductory Biology I (BIOL-121), Introductory Biology II (BIOL-122), General-Organic-Biochemistry I (CHMG-III), College Physics I (PHYS-111), College Physics II (PHYS-112)

Arts and Imaging Studies

Semester Requirements

Kenneth F. Hoffmann, Chairperson
(585) 475-2890 (V/TTY), kenneth.hoffmann@rit.edu

http://www.rit.edu/NTID/ais

Program overview

People who work in the arts and imaging field are responsible for designing, organizing, and producing print and web-based media for business, communication, publishing, manufacturing, entertainment, and advertising markets. This is a very large, exciting field that requires a variety of computer-based and traditional visual skills. The arts and imaging studies major provides opportunities for students to enter various careers ranging from creative to highly technical positions at various degree levels.

[arrow] Click to view program requirements in the Quarter Calendar

Quarter Curriculum - For Reference Only

Effective fall 2013, RIT will convert its academic calendar from quarters to semesters. The following content has been made available as reference only. Currently matriculated students who began their academic programs in quarters should consult their academic adviser for guidance and course selection.

Program overview

People who work in the arts and imaging field are responsible for designing, organizing, and producing print and Web-based media for business, communication, publishing, manufacturing, entertainment, and advertising markets. This is a very large, exciting field that requires a variety of computer-based and traditional visual skills. The arts and imaging studies program provides opportunities for students to enter various careers ranging from creative to highly technical positions at various degree levels.

The arts and imaging studies programs include a core component of nine courses (27 credits) plus a required cooperative work experience. The core courses provide a solid foundation for continuing in advanced courses, a baccalaureate program, and employment. Several of the core courses are scheduled during the first year, and additional courses are completed during the second year.

In addition to the core courses taken in the first year, students immediately begin course work in their concentration. Students may choose a concentration in graphic design or graphic technology. Both concentrations consist of 24 credit hours.

All students entering the program will be given an aptitude assessment experience. As a result of this assessment profile, students will be counseled and placed into an initial concentration: graphic design for students with creative aptitude and interest; graphic technology for students with technical/production aptitude and interest. The assessment is not final. Based on success and demonstrated capabilities, students may request or be counseled to change their program concentration.

The program's curriculum includes nine credits of technical electives and three credits of free electives. Students may select their technical elective courses from four different professional focus areas that provide additional depth of skill and knowledge specific to a career pathway:

  • graphic design
  • photography
  • print publishing
  • Web design

Technical electives may be chosen from a concentration area, a list of technical electives or, as appropriate, courses from other related programs. Free electives can be selected from any program within RIT, depending on availability and prerequisites.

All students gain real work experience through one quarter of required cooperative education employment. Upon satisfactory conclusion of the co-op, students complete a required portfolio presentation course in which they refine and complete their portfolio as needed for an application to a baccalaureate program or the search for employment.

On-the-job responsibilities

Depending on the specific program concentration and elective course selection, graduates use computer-based methods to produce drawings, layouts, illustrations, and digital photographic images; prepare documents for print, Web, and digital distribution; produce interactive digital media; perform digital retouching and restoration of photographic images; produce composite digital images; design and produce websites; produce computer animations; plan and produce short edited videos; and operate electrophotographic digital printing and inkjet systems, simple bindery, and finishing equipment.

Places of employment

Graduates usually find employment in a variety of commercial, corporate, government, and educational settings. Examples include computer graphics firms, advertising agencies, art studios, printing or manufacturing plants, prepress companies, in-house printing or marketing departments, book and magazine publishing houses, newspaper facilities, government agencies, industrial training or media departments, educational media centers, and educational institutions.

Graduates may qualify for positions such as production graphic artist, graphic designer, digital photo artist, digital photography technician, digital prepress technician, video technician, website designer, website technician, and digital printing systems operator.

Prerequisites

Successful completion of a sampling experience offered during the Summer Vestibule Program and also during the academic year is required. The sampling activities provide opportunities for students to learn about the arts and imaging field, identify career opportunities, and evaluate their interest and aptitude for a degree program.

ACT-AAS minimum score = 18

ACT-AOS minimum score = 15

English-AAS: Placement into the Written Communication II (0502-111) course.

English-AOS: Placement into English level C or above. Students successfully completing AOS degrees typically enter with reading scores equivalent to 8.0 on the California Reading Test.

Mathematics-AAS/AOS: Placement into the Concepts of Measurement (0884-150) course. Typically, students entering this program will have completed at least two years of high school mathematics.

Science-AAS/AOS: Typically, students entering this program will have completed at least two years of high school science.

Curriculum

Semester conversion
Effective fall 2013, RIT will convert its academic calendar from quarters to semesters. Each program and its associated courses have been sent to the New York State Department of Education for approval of the semester plan. For reference, the following charts illustrate the typical course sequence for this program in both quarters and semesters. Students should consult their academic advisers with questions regarding planning and course selection.

Arts and imaging studies (graphic design concentration), AAS degree, typical course sequence (quarters)

CourseQtr. Cr. Hrs.
First Year
0855-311 Basic Drawing 3
0855-252 Vector Graphics 3
0855-255 Principles of Design 3
0855-251 Bitmap Graphics 3
0855-253, 318 Typography I, II 6
0855-314 Color in Design 3
0855-331 Desktop Publishing I 3
0855-319 Graphic Design 3
0502-227 Writing Seminar 4
0887-200 Freshman Seminar 2
  Mathematics (Level B)‡ 3
  Liberal Arts* 8
  Wellness Education† 0
Second Year
0855-342 Web Design I 3
0855-361 Grid Systems 3
0855-315 History of Graphic Design 3
0855-362 Publication Design 3
0855-323 Digital Photography I 3
0855-363 Identity Systems Design 3
  Technical Electives 9
0806-101 Job Search Process 2
  Liberal Arts* 8
  Science (Level B or above) 3
  Deaf Cultural Studies/ASL* 3
0855-299 Cooperative Education Co-op
Third Year
0855-353 Portfolio Presentation 3
0855-351 Production Workshop 3
  Free Elective 3
0806-201 Employment Seminar 1
  Capstone* 3
Total Quarter Credit Hours 100

* Please see General Education Distribution Requirements chart for more information.

† Please see Wellness Education Requirement for more information.

‡ Satisfied by Concepts of Measurement (0884-150) or higher-level course.

Arts and imaging studies (graphic technology concentration), AAS degree, typical course sequence (quarters)

CourseQtr. Cr. Hrs.
First Year
0855-251 Bitmap Graphics 3
0855-252 Vector Graphics 3
0855-323 Digital Photography I 3
0855-254 Applied Color Theory 3
0855-253 Typography I 3
0855-255 Principles of Design 3
0855-331 Desktop Publishing I 3
0855-321 Image Acquisition 3
0855-342 Web Design I 3
0502-227 Writing Seminar 4
0887-200 Freshman Seminar 2
  Mathematics (Level B)‡ 3
  Liberal Arts* 8
  Wellness Education† 0
Second Year
0855-322 Bitmap Graphics II 3
0855-344 Videography I 3
0855-324 Wide-Format Graphics 3
0855-333 Publication Production I 3
0855-332 PDF Production and Workflow 3
0855-352 Color Management 3
  Technical Electives 9
0806-101 Job Search Process 2
  Liberal Arts* 8
  Science (Level B or above) 3
  Deaf Cultural Studies/ASL* 3
0855-299 Cooperative Education Co-op
Third Year
0855-353 Portfolio Presentation 3
0855-351 Production Workshop 3
  Free Elective 3
0806-201 Employment Seminar 1
  Capstone* 3
Total Quarter Credit Hours 100

* Please see General Education Distribution Requirements chart for more information.

† Please see Wellness Education Requirement for more information.

‡ Satisfied by Concepts of Measurement (0884-150) or higher-level course.

Arts and imaging studies, AAS degree, typical course sequence (semesters), effective fall 2013

CourseSem. Cr. Hrs.
First Year
NAIS-120 Principles of Design and Color 3
NAIS-130 Raster and Vector Graphics 3
Choose one of the following: 3
   NGRD-111    Drawing I‡  
   NGRP-110    Digital Photography I§  
  LAS Foundation 1: First-Year Seminar 3
NMTH-120 LAS Elective: Mathematics** 3
  ASL/Deaf Cultural Studies†  
NAIS-140 Graphic Design and Typography I 3
NAIS-150 Page Layout I 3
NAIS-160 Web Design I 3
ENGL-150 LAS Foundation 2: Writing Seminar 3
NSCI-120 LAS Perspective 6†† 3
  Wellness Education* 0
Second Year
NAIS-201 Employment Seminar 3
Choose two of the following: 6
   NGRD-240    Graphic Design and Typography II‡  
   NGRD-221    History of Graphic Design‡  
   NGRP-231    Image Preparation§  
   NGRP-245    Color Theory and Management§  
  Professional/Technical Elective 3
  LAS Perspective 1 3
Choose two of the following: 6
   NGRD-255    Publication Design‡  
   NGRD-256    Identity Design‡  
   NGRP-252    PDF Production and Workflow§  
   NGRP-250    Page Layout II§  
NAIS-291 Production Workshop 3
  LAS Perspective 2, 3 6
NAIS-299 Cooperative Education Co-op
Third Year
NAIS-292 Portfolio Workshop 3
  Professional/Technical Elective 3
Choose one of the following: 3
   NGRD-230    Digital Illustration‡  
   NGRP-270    Specialty Graphics Imaging§  
  LAS Perspective 4 3
Total Semester Credit Hours 72

Please see New NTID General Education Curriculum-Liberal Arts and Sciences (LAS) for more information.

* Please see Wellness Education Requirement for more information.

† A 3-credit ASL/Deaf Cultural Studies course, to be taken at NTID or another college of RIT; will count for RIT Gen Ed credit if it is simultaneously an RIT (non-NTID) Perspective Category course.

‡ NGRD courses/Graphic Design concentration      

§ NGRP courses/Graphic Production concentration

** Any mathematics course numbered NMTH-120 or higher.

†† Any science course numbered NSCI-120 or higher.

Professional electives

Students select nine credit hours from one of the following professional areas.

CourseQtr. Cr. Hrs.
Graphic design
0855-310 Visual Idea Development 3
0855-312 Intermediate Drawing 3
0855-313 Advanced Drawing 3
0855-316 Art History I 3
0855-317 Art History II 3
0855-364 Digital Illustration 3
Photography
0855-371 Dynamic Image Preparation 3
0855-372 Composite Imaging 3
0855-373 Digital Photography II 3
0855-374 Image Retouch and Restore 3
Print publishing
0855-334 Database Publishing 3
0855-381 Desktop Publishing II 3
0855-382 Interactive PDF Publishing 3
0855-383 Publication Production II 3
0855-384 Digital Printing Systems 3
Web design
0855-341 Graphics for the Web 3
0855-343 Computer Animation 3
0855-391 Web Design II 3
0855-392 Web Design III 3
0855-394 Interactive Digital Media 3

Arts and Imaging Studies

Semester Requirements

Kenneth F. Hoffmann, Chairperson
(585) 475-2890 (V/TTY), kenneth.hoffmann@rit.edu

http://www.rit.edu/NTID/ais

Program overview

People who work in the arts and imaging field are responsible for designing, organizing, and producing print and Web-based media for business, communication, publishing, manufacturing, entertainment, and advertising markets. This is a large, exciting field that requires a variety of computer-based and traditional visual skills. The arts and imaging studies major provides opportunities for students to enter various careers ranging from creative to highly technical positions at various degree levels.

[arrow] Click to view program requirements in the Quarter Calendar

Quarter Curriculum - For Reference Only

Effective fall 2013, RIT will convert its academic calendar from quarters to semesters. The following content has been made available as reference only. Currently matriculated students who began their academic programs in quarters should consult their academic adviser for guidance and course selection.

Program overview

People who work in the arts and imaging field are responsible for designing, organizing, and producing print and Web-based media for business, communication, publishing, manufacturing, entertainment, and advertising markets. This is a large, exciting field that requires a variety of computer-based and traditional visual skills. The arts and imaging studies program provides opportunities for students to enter various careers ranging from creative to highly technical positions at various degree levels.

The arts and imaging studies programs include nine required core courses (27 credits) plus a required cooperative education experience. The core courses provide a solid foundation for continuing in advanced courses, a baccalaureate program, and employment. Several of the core courses are scheduled during the first year, and additional courses are completed during the second year.

In addition to the core courses taken in the first year, students immediately begin course work in their concentration. Students may choose a concentration in graphic design or graphic technology. Both concentrations consist of 24 credit hours.

All students entering the program will be given an aptitude assessment experience. As a result of this assessment profile, students will be counseled and placed into an initial concentration: graphic design for students with creative aptitude and interest; graphic technology for students with technical/production aptitude and interest. The assessment is not final. Based on success and demonstrated capabilities, students may request or be counseled to change their program concentration.

The program's curriculum includes nine credits of technical electives and three credits of free electives. Students may select their technical elective courses from four different professional focus areas that provide students with additional depth of skill and knowledge specific to a career pathway:

  • graphic design
  • photography
  • print publishing
  • Web design


Technical electives may be chosen from a concentration area, a list of technical electives, or, as appropriate, courses from other related programs. Free electives can be selected from any program within RIT, depending on availability and prerequisites.

All students gain real work experience through one quarter of required cooperative education employment. Upon satisfactory conclusion of the co-op, students complete a required portfolio presentation course in which they refine and complete their portfolio as needed for an application to a baccalaureate program or the search for employment.

On-the-job responsibilities

Depending on the specific program concentration and elective course selection, graduates use computer-based methods to produce drawings, layouts, illustrations, and digital photographic images; prepare documents for print, Web, and digital distribution; produce interactive digital media; perform digital retouching and restoration of photographic images; produce composite digital images; design and produce websites; produce computer animations; plan and produce short edited videos; and operate electrophotographic digital printing and inkjet systems, simple bindery, and finishing equipment.

Places of employment

Graduates usually find employment in a variety of commercial, corporate, government, and educational settings. Examples include computer graphics firms, advertising agencies, art studios, printing or manufacturing plants, prepress companies, in-house printing or marketing departments, book and magazine publishing houses, newspaper facilities, government agencies, industrial training or media departments, educational media centers, and educational institutions.

Graduates may qualify for positions such as production graphic artist, graphic designer, digital photo artist, digital photography technician, digital prepress technician, video technician, website designer, website technician, and digital printing systems operator.

Prerequisites

Successful completion of a sampling experience offered during the Summer Vestibule Program and also during the academic year is required. The sampling activities provide opportunities for students to learn about the arts and imaging field, identify career opportunities, and evaluate their interest and aptitude for a degree program.

ACT-AAS minimum score = 18

ACT-AOS minimum score = 15

English-AAS: Placement into the Written Communication II (0502-111) course.

English-AOS: Placement into English level C or above. Students successfully completing AOS degrees typically enter with reading scores equivalent to 8.0 on the California Reading Test.

Mathematics-AAS/AOS: Placement into the Concepts of Measurement (0884-150) course. Typically, students entering this program will have completed at least two years of high school mathematics.

Science-AAS/AOS: Typically, students entering this program will have completed at least two years of high school science.

Curriculum

Semester conversion
Effective fall 2013, RIT will convert its academic calendar from quarters to semesters. Each program and its associated courses have been sent to the New York State Department of Education for approval of the semester plan. For reference, the following charts illustrate the typical course sequence for this program in both quarters and semesters. Students should consult their academic advisers with questions regarding planning and course selection.

Arts and imaging studies (graphic design concentration), AOS degree, typical course sequence (quarters)

CourseQtr. Cr. Hrs.
First Year
0855-311 Basic Drawing 3
0855-252 Vector Graphics 3
0855-255 Principles of Design 3
0855-251 Bitmap Graphics 3
0855-253, 318 Typography I, II 6
0855-314 Color in Design 3
0855-331 Desktop Publishing I 3
0855-319 Graphic Design 3
  English Level C 12
0887-200 Freshman Seminar 2
  Mathematics (Level B)‡ 3
  Wellness Education† 0
Second Year
0855-342 Web Design I 3
0855-361 Grid Systems 3
0855-315 History of Graphic Design 3
0855-362 Publication Design 3
0855-323 Digital Photography I 3
0855-363 Identity Systems Design 3
  Technical Electives 9
0806-101 Job Search Process 2
  Social Science* 3
  Humanities* 3
  Communication Studies* 3
  Deaf Cultural Studies/ASL* 3
  Science (Level B or above) 3
0855-299 Cooperative Education Co-op
Third Year
0855-353 Portfolio Presentation 3
0855-351 Production Workshop 3
  Free Elective 3
0806-201 Employment Seminar 1
  Capstone* 3
Total Quarter Credit Hours 101

* Please see NTID's General Education Distribution Requirements chart for more information.

† Please see Wellness Education Requirement for more information.

‡ Satisfied by Concepts of Measurement (0884-150) or higher-level course.

Arts and imaging studies (graphic technology concentration), AOS degree, typical course sequence (quarters)

CourseQtr. Cr. Hrs.
First Year
0855-251 Bitmap Graphics 3
0855-252 Vector Graphics 3
0855-323 Digital Photography I 3
0855-254 Applied Color Theory 3
0855-253 Typography I 3
0855-255 Principles of Design 3
0855-331 Desktop Publishing I 3
0855-321 Image Acquisition 3
0855-342 Web Design I 3
  English Level C 12
0887-200 Freshman Seminar 2
  Mathematics (Level B)‡ 3
  Wellness Education† 0
Second Year
0855-322 Bitmap Graphics II 3
0855-344 Videography I 3
0855-324 Wide-Format Graphics 3
0855-333 Publication Production I 3
0855-332 PDF Production and Workflow 3
0855-352 Color Management 3
  Technical Electives 9
0806-101 Job Search Process 2
  Social Science* 3
  Humanities* 3
  Communication Studies* 3
  Deaf Cultural Studies/ASL* 3
  Science (Level B or above) 3
0855-299 Cooperative Education Co-op
Third Year
0855-353 Portfolio Presentation 3
0855-351 Production Workshop 3
  Free Elective 3
0806-201 Employment Seminar 1
  Capstone* 3
Total Quarter Credit Hours 101

* Please see General Education Distribution Requirements chart for more information.

† Please see Wellness Education Requirement for more information.

‡ Satisfied by Concepts of Measurement (0884-150) or higher-level course.

Arts and imaging studies, AOS degree, typical course sequence (semesters), effective fall 2013

CourseSem. Cr. Hrs.
First Year
NAIS-120 Principles of Design and Color 3
NAIS-130 Raster and Vector Graphics 3
Choose one of the following: 3
   NGRD-111    Drawing I‡  
   NGRP-110    Digital Photography I§  
NENG-212 NTID LAS Foundation: Career English I 3
NCAR-100 Freshman Seminar 1
NAIS-140 Graphic Design and Typography I 3
NAIS-150 Page Layout I 3
NAIS-160 Web Design I 3
NENG-213 NTID LAS Foundation: Career English II 3
NMTH-120 NTID LAS Foundation: Mathematics** 3
  Wellness Education* 0
Second Year
NAIS-201 Employment Seminar 3
Choose two of the following: 6
   NGRD-240    Graphic Design and Typography II‡  
   NGRD-221    History of Graphic Design‡  
   NGRP-231    Image Preparation§  
   NGRP-245    Color Theory and Management§  
  Professional/Technical Elective 3
NSCI-120 NTID LAS Perspective: Scientific Processes†† 3
Choose two of the following: 6
   NGRD-255    Publication Design‡  
   NGRD-256    Identity Design‡  
   NGRP-252    PDF Production and Workflow§  
   NGRP-250    Page Layout II§  
NAIS-291 Production Workshop 3
  NTID LAS Perspective: Creative and Innovative Exploration 3
  NTID LAS Foundation: ASL/Deaf Cultural Studies† 3
NAIS-299 Cooperative Education Co-op
Third Year
NAIS-292 Portfolio Workshop 3
  Professional/Technical Elective 3
Choose one of the following: 3
   NGRD-230    Digital Illustration‡  
   NGRP-270    Specialty Graphics Imaging§  
  NTID LAS Perspective: Communication, Social and Global Awareness  
  NTID LAS Elective 3
Total Semester Credit Hours 73

Please see New NTID General Education Curriculum-Liberal Arts and Sciences (LAS) for more information.

* Please see Wellness Education Requirement for more information.

† NHSS-150 Deaf Perspectives on Contemporary Civilization or NASL-190 American Sign Language I

‡ NGRD courses/Graphic Design concentration       

§ NGRP courses/Graphic Production concentration

** Any mathematics course numbered NMTH-120 or higher

†† Any science course numbered NSCI-120 or higher

Professional electives

Students select nine credit hours from one of the following professional areas.

CourseQtr. Cr. Hrs.
Graphic design
0855-310 Visual Idea Development 3
0855-312 Intermediate Drawing 3
0855-313 Advanced Drawing 3
0855-316 Art History I 3
0855-317 Art History II 3
0855-364 Digital Illustration 3
Photography
0855-371 Dynamic Image Preparation 3
0855-372 Composite Imaging 3
0855-373 Digital Photography II 3
0855-374 Image Retouch and Restore 3
Print publishing
0855-334 Database Publishing 3
0855-381 Desktop Publishing II 3
0855-382 Interactive PDF Publishing 3
0855-383 Publication Production II 3
0855-384 Digital Printing Systems 3
Web design
0855-341 Graphics for the Web 3
0855-343 Computer Animation 3
0855-391 Web Design II 3
0855-392 Web Design III 3
0855-394 Interactive Digital Media 3

Applied Mechanical Technology

Semester Requirements

Dino Laury, Chairperson
(585) 286-4613 (VP), dino@mail.rit.edu

http://www.rit.edu/NTID/amtAplusB

Program overview

The AAS in applied mechanical technology is an Associate+Bachelor’s degree program that prepares students to enter and successfully complete a baccalaureate program in the College of Applied Science and Technology in manufacturing engineering technology or mechanical engineering technology. Students strengthen their skills by taking courses taught by NTID faculty.

These courses systematically address the preparatory challenges that deaf and hard-of-hearing students face upon entry to the majors in the College of Applied Science and Technology.

[arrow] Click to view program requirements in the Quarter Calendar

Quarter Curriculum - For Reference Only

Effective fall 2013, RIT will convert its academic calendar from quarters to semesters. The following content has been made available as reference only. Currently matriculated students who began their academic programs in quarters should consult their academic adviser for guidance and course selection.

Program overview

The AAS in applied mechanical technology is an Associate+Bachelor’s degree program that prepares students to enter and successfully complete a baccalaureate program in the College of Applied Science and Technology in manufacturing engineering technology or mechanical engineering technology. Students strengthen their skills by taking NTID English and science courses or NTID math and science courses, as well as program courses. These courses systematically address the preparatory challenges that deaf and hard-of-hearing students face upon entry to the programs in the College of Applied Science and Technology.

Students in the applied mechanical technology program receive a comprehensive foundation in engineering fundamentals: precision measurement, precision machining, computer-aided design applications, strength of materials, and machine design. Upon successful completion of the AAS degree in applied mechanical technology, students enroll directly into the bachelor’s degree program in either manufacturing engineering technology or mechanical engineering technology.

Prerequisites

ACT: Composite test score of 18 or higher

English: Placement into the College of Liberal Arts’ Writing Seminar (0502-227) course; students who qualify for Written Communication II (0502-111) will be considered for admission.

Mathematics: Entrance into NTID’s Elements of Trigonometry (0884-220) course.

Science: Entrance into the College of Science’s College Physics I course after a single NTID science course.

Enrollment requirements

Students who graduate in good standing from NTID and have maintained a grade of C or better in the six NTID applied mechanical technology technical courses should be well-prepared for the College of Applied Science and Technology.

Curriculum

Semester conversion
Effective fall 2013, RIT will convert its academic calendar from quarters to semesters. Each program and its associated courses have been sent to the New York State Department of Education for approval of the semester plan. For reference, the following charts illustrate the typical course sequence for this program in both quarters and semesters. Students should consult their academic advisers with questions regarding planning and course selection.

Applied mechanical technology, AAS degree, typical course sequence (quarters)

CourseQtr. Cr. Hrs.
First Year
0813-220 Engineering Fundamentals 4
0890-212 Computing Tools for Engineering Technology 4
Choose two of the following courses: 8
    0884-220     Elements of Trigonometry  
    0885-201     Physics  
0502-111 Written Communication II  
0887-200 Freshman Seminar 2
0813-222 Manufacturing Processes 4
0890-214 CAD Applications in Engineering Tech 4
0884-275 Advanced Math 4
  Liberal Arts* 4
0502-227 Writing Seminar 4
0813-224 Industrial Processes 4
0890-216 Design, Dimensioning, and Tolerancing 4
1017-211 College Physics I 4
  Wellness Education† 0
Second Year
0610-211 Introduction to Materials Technology 3
0610-304 Materials Testing 1
1017-212 College Physics II 4
0610-302 Introduction to Statics 4
0610-303 Strength of Materials 4
1016-231, 232 Calculus for Engineering Technology I, II 8
1017-213 College Physics III 4
0610-315 Principles of Mechanical Design I 4
0610-305 Pneumatic and Hydraulic Systems 4
  Liberal Arts* 12
Total Quarter Credit Hours 98

* Please see General Education Distribution Requirements chart for more information. (AMT students are not required to take Capstone or Deaf cultural studies/ASL courses.)

† Please see Wellness Education Requirement for more information.

Applied mechanical technology, AAS degree, typical course sequence (semesters), effective fall 2013

CourseSem. Cr. Hrs.
First Year
NETS-101 Fundamentals of Engineering 3
NETS-110 Foundations of Materials 2
NETS-111 Foundations of Materials Lab 1
MATH-171 LAS Elective: Calculus A 3
ENGL-099 Basic Writing 3
  LAS Foundation 1: First Year Seminar 3
NETS-120 Manufacturing Processes 3
NETS-150 Mechanical Design and Fab 3
NETS-151 Mechanical Design and Fab Lab 1
MATH-172 Calculus B 3
PHYS-111 LAS Perspective 6: College Physics 1 4
ENGL-150 LAS Foundation 2: Writing Seminar 3
  Wellness Education* 0
Second Year
MCET-220 Principles of Statics 3
MCET-210 Materials in Engineering Design 2
MCET-211 Materials in Engineering Design Lab 1
PHYS-112 College Physics II 4
  LAS Perspective 1, 2, 3, 4 12
MCET-221 Strength of Materials 3
EEET-215 Circuits/Electronics 2
EEET-216 Circuits/Electronics Lab 1
MATH-211 Elements of Multivariable Calculus and Differential Equations 3
Total Semester Credit Hours 63

Please see New NTID General Education Curriculum-Liberal Arts and Sciences (LAS) for more information.

* Please see Wellness Education Requirement for more information.