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Computer Engineering MS

Semester Requirements

Shanchieh Jay Yang, Department Head
(585) 475-2987, jay.yang@rit.edu

Dhireesha Kudithipudi, Graduate Coordinator
(585) 475-5085, dxkeec@rit.edu

http://www.rit.edu/kgcoe/program/computer-engineering-0

Program overview

The master of science degree in computer engineering provides students with a higher level of specialized knowledge in computer engineering, strengthening their ability to successfully formulate solutions to current technical problems, and offering a significant independent learning experience in preparation for further graduate study or for continuing professional development at the leading edge of the discipline. The program accommodates applicants with undergraduate degrees in computer engineering or related programs such as electrical engineering or computer science. (Some additional bridge courses may be required for applicants from undergraduate degrees outside of computer engineering.)

Curriculum

The degree requires 30 semester credit hours and includes four core courses, four graduate electives (subject to a faculty adviser’s approval), two to three semesters of graduate seminar, and 6 semester credit hours of thesis research. Core courses and graduate electives provide breadth and depth of knowledge to conduct meaningful thesis research.

The Computer Engineering Graduate Seminar (CMPE-795) provides students with exposure to a variety of research topics presented by researchers from within RIT and from throughout the computer engineering field. Students are expected to conduct graduate level thesis research under the supervision of a primary faculty adviser and thesis committee.

Computer engineering, MS degree, typical course sequence (semesters), effective fall 2013

Course Sem. Cr. Hrs.
First Year
CMPE-610 Analytical Topics in Computer Engineering 3
CMPE-630 Digital Integrated Circuit Design 3
CMPE-655 Multiple Processor Systems 3
CMPE-660 Reconfigurable Computing 3
CMPE-795 Graduate Seminar 0
  Graduate Electives 6
Second Year
  Graduate Electives 6
CMPE-795 Graduate Seminar 0
CMPE-790 Thesis 6
Total Semester Credit Hours 30

Thesis research

An important aspect of graduate study is the student’s preparation to lead challenging, state-of-the-art technical projects. To do this effectively, it is essential that students obtain experiences in reviewing related work of others in the field, as well as conducting meaningful independent research under a faculty mentor.

Thesis work begins by selecting a faculty adviser, identifying a topic, forming a committee (which approves the research topic), and submitting a proposal. The thesis topic, formulated by working closely with a faculty adviser, is related to recent technical developments in the field of computer engineering. Upon completion of the research outlined in the thesis proposal, the work is reported in a document submitted to the faculty committee and a thesis defense presentation. A technical paper resulting from the thesis research is submitted to a refereed conference or journal for publication.

Admission requirements

To be considered for admission to the MS program in computer engineering, candidates must fulfill the following requirements:

  • Hold a baccalaureate degree from an accredited university in computer engineering or a related field,
  • Submit official transcripts (in English) from all previously completed undergraduate and graduate course work,
  • Have an GPA of 3.0 or higher,
  • Submit scores from the Graduate Record Exam (GRE),
  • Submit two letters of reference from individuals well qualified to judge the candidate's ability for graduate study, and
  • Complete a graduate application.
  • International applicants whose native language is not English must submit scores from the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) or International English Language Testing System (IELTS).

[arrow] Click to view program requirements in the Quarter Calendar

Quarter Curriculum - For Reference Only

Effective fall 2013, RIT will convert its academic calendar from quarters to semesters. The following content has been made available as reference only. Currently matriculated students who began their academic programs in quarters should consult their academic adviser for guidance and course selection.

Program overview

The master of science degree in computer engineering provides students with a higher level of specialized knowledge in computer engineering, strengthening their ability to successfully formulate solutions to current technical problems, and offering a significant independent learning experience in preparation for further graduate study or for continuing professional development at the leading edge of the discipline. The program accommodates applicants with undergraduate degrees in computer engineering or related programs such as electrical engineering or computer science. (Some additional bridge courses may be required for applicants from undergraduate degrees outside of computer engineering.)

Curriculum

The degree requires 45 quarter credit hours and includes four core courses, three courses within an area of concentration, two graduate electives (subject to a faculty adviser’s approval), and 9 quarter credit hours of thesis research. Core courses and graduate electives provide breadth of knowledge. Concentration courses allow students to pursue an area of specialization in the field of computer engineering by completing a cohesive set of three courses beyond the core degree requirements. This provides students with enough depth to conduct meaningful thesis research.

All computer engineering students with graduate standing are expected to attend the Computer Engineering Graduate Seminar. These courses build on the knowledge a student has previously gained through a BS degree in computer engineering or a related discipline.

Semester conversion
Effective fall 2013, RIT will convert its academic calendar from quarters to semesters. Each program and its associated courses have been sent to the New York State Department of Education for approval of the semester plan. For reference, the following charts illustrate the typical course sequence for this program in both quarters and semesters. Students should consult their graduate program adviser with questions regarding planning and course selection.

Computer engineering, MS degree, typical course sequence (quarters)

CourseQtr. Cr. Hrs.
0306-720 Electronic Design Automation 4
0306-730 VLSI Design 4
0306-740 Analytical Topics for Computer Engineers 4
0306-756 Multiple Processor Systems 4
  Concentration Course 1, 2, 3 12
  Graduate Electives 1, 2 8
  Thesis Research 9
Total Quarter Credit Hours 45

Computer engineering, MS degree, typical course sequence (semesters), effective fall 2013

CourseSem. Cr. Hrs.
First Year
CMPE-660 Reconfigurable Computing 3
CMPE-630 Digital Integrated Circuit Design 3
CMPE-740 Analytical Topics in Computer Engineering 3
CMPE-795 CMPE Graduate Seminar 0
CMPE-756 Multiple Processor Systems 3
  Graduate Electives 6
Second Year
  Graduate Electives 6
CMPE-795 CMPE Graduate Seminar 0
CMPE-790 MSCE Thesis 6
Total Semester Credit Hours 30

Thesis research

An important aspect of graduate study is the student’s preparation to lead challenging, state-of-the-art technical projects. To do this effectively, it is essential that the student obtain experiences in reviewing related work of others in the field, as well as conducting meaningful independent research under faculty mentorship.

Thesis work begins by selecting a faculty adviser, identifying a topic, forming a committee (which approves the research topic), and submitting a proposal. The thesis topic, formulated by working closely with a faculty adviser, is related to recent technical developments in the field of computer engineering. Upon completion of the research outlined in the thesis proposal, the work is reported in a document submitted to the faculty committee and a thesis defense presentation. A technical paper resulting from the thesis research is submitted to a refereed conference or journal for publication.

Areas of concentration

The following areas of concentration are available. Students are allowed to take relevant courses from other academic programs, including electrical engineering, computer science, or software engineering, to fulfill a specific research focus.

Computer Architecture

Computer architecture deals with hardware resource management, instruction set architectures and their close connection with the underlying hardware, and the interconnection and communication of those hardware components. Some of the current computer architecture challenges that are being tackled in the computer engineering department include energy efficient architectures, high performance architectures, graphic processing units (GPUs), reconfigurable hardware, chip multiprocessors, and networks-on-chips.

Control and Embedded Systems

This research area is concerned with algorithms and devices used at the core of systems that interact with our physical world. As such, this area considers the sensing, analysis, and modeling of dynamic systems with the intent of measuring information about a system, communicating this information and processing it to adapt its behavior. Application areas are robust feedback-based control where uncertainty in the dynamics and environment must be considered during the design process and signal processing algorithms and devices for system sensing and adaptation.

Digital signal Processing and Computer Vision

Digital signal processing focuses on the acquisition of signals from the physical world and their processing on a computing platform. This concentration's application areas are broad and include audio and speech processing, image and video processing, sensor-level processing, sonar and radar processing, and biomedical signal processing. Computer vision extracts information from visual data and includes methods for feature extraction, classification, and understanding of images and video.

Nanoscale circuits and systems

Modern processors demand high computational density, small form factors, and low energy dissipation with extremely high performance demands. This is enabled by the nanoscale and heterogeneous integration of transistors at massive-scale. Such nanocomputers will open unimaginable opportunities as well as challenges to computer engineers. This concentration focuses on how to design nanocomputers in the presence of severe physical constraints, investigate dynamic reconfigurability to exploit the power of nano-scale electronics for building reliable computing systems, and study the applicability of emerging technologies to address challenges in bio-inspired systems.

Networks and security

The prevalence of interconnected computing, sensing, and actuating devices have transformed our way of life. Ubiquitous access to data using/from these devices with reliable performance as well as security assurance presents exciting challenges for engineers and scientists. Resilient to environmental uncertainty, system failures, and cyber attacks require advances in hardware, software, and networking techniques. The networks and security concentration focuses on intelligent wireless and sensor networks, cryptographic engineering, and predictive cyber situation awareness.

Admission requirements

To be considered for admission to the MS program in computer engineering, candidates must fulfill the following requirements:

  • Hold a baccalaureate degree from an accredited university in computer engineering or a related field,
  • Submit official transcripts (in English) from all previously completed undergraduate and graduate course work,
  • Have an GPA of 3.0 or higher,
  • Submit scores from the Graduate Record Exam (GRE),
  • Submit two letters of reference from individuals well qualified to judge the candidate's ability for graduate study, and
  • Complete a graduate application.
  • International applicants whose native language is not English must submit scores from the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL).