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Computer Engineering Technology BS

Semester Requirements

Michael Eastman, Department Chair
(585) 475-7787, mgeiee@rit.edu

http://www.rit.edu/cast/ectet/bs-in-computer-engineering-technology.php

Program overview

Embedded systems are at the heart of devices and systems used every day. Computer engineers design embedded systems for medical diagnostic equipment, digital cameras, missile guidance systems, anti-lock braking systems, scanners, copiers, switches, routers, and cell phones. The embedded systems designer requires knowledge of computer hardware and software.

The computer engineering technology major is designed to meet industry’s ever-increasing need for engineers with an in-depth knowledge of hardware and software design and development. The curriculum bridges the gap between these two disciplines by providing a solid foundation in each and integrating them with intensive classroom and laboratory experiences.

From a software perspective, students gain a strong background in cutting-edge development with programming languages currently used in industry. Students learn industry standard approaches to application software development as well as state-of-the-art problem-solving techniques. Students learn techniques for developing applications code and firmware, and they understand and appreciate the difference. Embedded “C” and assembly language programming are performed in numerous courses.

The hardware focus of the curriculum is on digital systems design and development. From low-level gate design to high-end microprocessors and current bus standards, students gain an architectural understanding of computer systems. The curriculum includes in-depth design and analysis of combinational logic, sequential logic and state machines, micro-controller systems, microprocessor systems, and state-of-the-art computer technology. Students perform schematic entry timing analysis and FPGA development in VHDL using industry standard computer-aided engineering tools.

A capstone experience in the fifth year enables students to integrate their hardware and software expertise in a semester-long project course.

The emphasis on hardware and software design, along with a solid foundation in math, science, and the liberal arts, produces graduates who are well-prepared to enter the work force as design engineers or to pursue advanced degrees. Students will gain depth of knowledge and breadth of experience that will inspire them to pursue successful careers in their chosen professional field and embark on a path of lifelong learning.

Cooperative education

The program requires students to complete approximately 50 weeks of cooperative education. Students may begin their co-op experience in the third year of the program. Co-ops may be completed during the academic year or during the summer. Each student is assigned a co-op adviser to assist in identifying and applying to opportunities.

Accreditation

The computer engineering technology major is accredited by the Technology Accreditation Commission of the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology ABET, http://www.abet.org.

Curriculum

Computer engineering technology, BS degree, typical course sequence (semesters), effective fall 2013

Course Sem. Cr. Hrs.
First Year
MATH-171 LAS Perspective 7A: Calculus A 3
EEET-111, 112 DC Circuits and Lab 4
CPET-141, 142 Digital Fundamentals and Lab 3
  LAS Perspective 1, 2 6
  LAS Foundation 1: First Year Seminar† 3
MATH-172 LAS Perspective 7B: Calculus B 3
EEET-121, 122 AC Circuits and Lab 4
CPET-121 Computational Problem Solving I 3
  LAS Foundation 2: First Year Writing  3
  Wellness Education* 0
Second Year
MATH-173 Calculus C 3
EEET-211, 212 Electronics I and Lab 4
CPET-201, 202 Microcontroller Systems and Lab 3
  LAS Perspective 3, 4 6
CHMG-141, 145 LAS Perspective 5: General and Analytical Chemistry I and Lab 4
MATH-211 Calculus and DEQ 3
EEET-221, 222 Electronics II and Lab 3
CPET-241, 242 Digital Systems Design and Lab 4
STAT-145 Introduction to Statistics I 3
Third Year
PHYS-111 LAS Perspective 6: College Physics I 4
EEET-321 Signals Systems and Transforms 4
CPET-341, 342 Hardware Description Language and Lab 3
CPET-321 Computational Problem Solving II 3
  LAS Immersion 1 3
EEET-299 Career Orientation 0
CPET-499 Cooperative Education Co-op
Fourth Year
CPET-481 Networking Technologies 3
EEET-425 Digital Signal Processing 4
EEET-421 Design and Innovation (WI) 3
  LAS Immersion 2, 3 6
  Technical Electives  6
MFET-436 Engineering Economics 3
CPET-561 Embedded Systems Design I 4
CPET-461 Real Time Operating Systems 3
CPET-499 Cooperative Education Co-op
Fifth Year
CPET-499 Cooperative Education Co-op
CPET-563 Embedded Systems Design II 3
  General Education Electives 6
  Free Electives 6
Total Semester Credit Hours 129

Please see New General Education Curriculum–Liberal Arts and Sciences (LAS) for more information.

(WI) Refers to a writing intensive course within the major.

* Please see Wellness Education Requirement for more information. Students completing bachelor's degrees are required to complete two Wellness courses.
† The First Year Seminar requirement is replaced by an LAS Elective for the 2013-14 academic year.

Options

Students may elect to use the two technical electives and the two free electives to complete an option in audio or telecommunications. Each option consists of four courses.

Audio

EEET-261 Fundamentals of Audio Engineering
EEET-361 Modern Audio Production
EEET-461 Introduction to Acoustics
EEET-531 Audio Power Amplifier

Telecommunications

CPET-481 Network Technologies
EEET-311 Communications Elective with Lab
EEET-525 Wireless RF Systems
EEET-531 Fiber Optics Technology

 

Accelerated dual degree option

The program, in conjunction with the department of computer science in the B. Thomas Golisano College of Computing and Information Sciences, offers an accelerated dual degree option that combines the bachelor’s degree in computer engineering technology and a master’s degree in computer science.

Computer engineering technology, BS degree/Computer science, MS degree, typical course sequence (semesters), effective fall 2013

Course Sem. Cr. Hrs.
First Year
MATH-171 LAS Perspective 7A: Calculus A 3
EEET-111, 112 DC Circuits and Lab 4
CPET-141, 142 Digital Fundamentals and Lab 3
  LAS Perspective 1, 2 6
  LAS Foundation 1: First Year Seminar† 3
MATH-172 LAS Perspective 7B: Calculus B 3
EEET-121, 122 AC Circuits and Lab 4
CPET-121 Computational Problem Solving I 3
  LAS Foundation 2: First Year Writing  3
  Wellness Education* 0
Second Year
MATH-173 Calculus C 3
EEET-211, 212 Electronics I and Lab 4
CPET-201, 202 Microcontroller Systems and Lab 3
  LAS Perspective 3, 4 6
CHMG-141, 145 LAS Perspective 5: General and Analytical Chemistry I and Lab 4
MATH-211 Calculus and DEQ 3
EEET-221, 222 Electronics II and Lab 3
CPET-241, 242 Digital Systems Design and Lab 4
STAT-251 Probability and Statistics I 3
Third Year
MATH-190 Discrete Math for Computing 3
EEET-321 Signals Systems and Transforms 4
CPET-341, 342 Hardware Description Language and Lab 3
CPET-321 Computational Problem Solving II 3
  LAS Immersion 1 3
EEET-299 Career Orientation 0
CPET-499 Cooperative Education (spring and summer) Co-op
Fourth Year
CSCI-262 Introduction to Computer Science Theory 3
PHYS-111 LAS Perspective 6: College Physics I 4
EEET-421 Design Innovation (WI) 3
  LAS Immersion 2 3
MFET-436 Engineering Economics 3
CPET-561 Embedded Systems Design I 4
CPET-461 Real Time Operating Systems 3
CSCI-605 Advanced Java Programming 3
CPET-499 Cooperative Education (summer) Co-op
Fifth Year
CSCI-620 Data Exploration and Management 3
CPET-481 Networking Technologies 3
EEET-425 Digital Signal Processing 4
CSCI-665 Foundations of Algorithms 3
CPET-563 Embedded Systems Design II 3
CSCI-720 Data Mining 3
CSCI-622 Secure Data Management 3
  LAS Immersion 3 3
Sixth Year
CSCI-687 Graduate Research Seminar 3
CSCI-631 Foundations of Computer Vision 3
Choose one of the following: 3
   CSCI-663    Computability  
   CSCI-664    Computational Complexity  
CSCI-799 Computer Science Graduate Independent Study 3
CSCI-790 Computer Science Thesis 6
Total Semester Credit Hours 150

Please see New General Education Curriculum–Liberal Arts and Sciences (LAS) for more information.

(WI) Refers to a writing intensive course within the major.

* Please see Wellness Education Requirement for more information. Students completing bachelor's degrees are required to complete two Wellness courses.
† The First Year Seminar requirement is replaced by an LAS Elective for the 2013-14 academic year.

[arrow] Click to view program requirements in the Quarter Calendar

Quarter Curriculum - For Reference Only

Effective fall 2013, RIT will convert its academic calendar from quarters to semesters. The following content has been made available as reference only. Currently matriculated students who began their academic programs in quarters should consult their academic adviser for guidance and course selection.

Program overview

Embedded systems are at the heart of devices and systems used every day. Computer engineers design embedded systems for medical diagnostic equipment, digital cameras, missile guidance systems, anti-lock braking systems, scanners, copiers, switches, routers, and cell phones. The embedded systems designer requires knowledge of computer hardware and software.

The computer engineering technology program is designed to meet industry’s ever-increasing need for engineers with an in-depth knowledge of hardware and software design and development. The curriculum bridges the gap between these two disciplines by providing a solid foundation in each and integrating them with intensive classroom and laboratory experiences.

From a software perspective, students gain a strong background in cutting-edge development with programming languages currently used in industry. Students learn industry standard approaches to application software development as well as state-of-the-art problem-solving techniques. Students learn techniques for developing applications code and firmware, and they understand and appreciate the difference. Embedded “C” and assembly language programming are performed in numerous courses.

The hardware focus of the curriculum is on digital systems design and development. From low-level gate design to high-end microprocessors and current bus standards, students gain an architectural understanding of computer systems. The curriculum includes in-depth design and analysis of combinational logic, sequential logic and state machines, micro-controller systems, microprocessor systems, and state-of-the-art computer technology. Students perform schematic entry timing analysis and FPGA development in VHDL using industry standard computer-aided engineering tools.

A capstone experience in the fifth year enables students to integrate their hardware and software expertise in a quarter-long project course.

The emphasis on hardware and software design, along with a solid foundation in math, science, and the liberal arts, produces graduates who are well-prepared to enter the work force as design engineers or to pursue advanced degrees. Students will gain depth of knowledge and breadth of experience that will inspire them to pursue successful careers in their chosen professional field and embark on a path of lifelong learning.

Cooperative education

The program requires students to complete five quarters of cooperative education. Students may begin their co-op experience in the third year of the program. Co-ops may be completed during the academic year or during the summer. Each student is assigned a co-op adviser to assist in identifying opportunities.

Accreditation

The computer engineering technology program is accredited by the Technology Accreditation Commission of ABET, http://www.abet.org.

Curriculum

Semester conversion
Effective fall 2013, RIT will convert its academic calendar from quarters to semesters. Each program and its associated courses have been sent to the New York State Department of Education for approval of the semester plan. For reference, the following charts illustrate the typical course sequence for this program in both quarters and semesters. Students should consult their academic advisers with questions regarding planning and course selection.

Computer engineering technology, BS degree, typical course sequence (quarters)

CourseQtr. Cr. Hrs.
First Year
0609-051, 052 Discovery, Pathways 2
0618-231, 232 Technical Programming I, II 8
0618-301 Digital Fundamentals 4
0609-214, 215, 216 Circuit Theory I, II, III 12
1016-261, 262 Calculus with Foundations I, II 8
1016-272 Calculus B 4
0618-303 Microcomputers 4
  Liberal Arts* 12
  Wellness Education† 0
Second Year
1016-319 Data Analysis 4
0618-233 Technical Programming III 4
0609-360, 361 Electronics I, II 8
1017-211, 212, 213 College Physics I, II, III 12
  Liberal Arts* 12
1016-273 Calculus C 4
Third Year
0618-438 Digital Systems Design I 4
0618-439 Electronic Design Automation 4
  Technical Elective 4
0609-407 Career Orientation 1
0614-477 Networking Technologies 4
1017-320 Principles of Optics 4
1016-304 Differential Equations for Engineering Technology 4
0535-403 Effective Technical Communication 4
  Cooperative Education Co-op
Fourth Year
0618-561, 562 Embedded Systems Design I, II 8
0609-333 Concepts in Systems and Signals 4
  Professional Concentration Elective 4
0609-442 Advanced Electronics 4
  Liberal Arts* 8
  Free Elective 4
  Cooperative Education Co-op
Fifth Year
0618-563 Embedded Systems Design III 4
  Professional Concentration Electives 8
  Liberal Arts* 4
0614-440 Ethics, Economics, and Planning for Engineers 4
  Free Electives 8
  Cooperative Education Co-op
Total Quarter Credit Hours 187

*Please see Liberal Arts General Education Requirements for more information.

†Please see Wellness Education Requirement for more information.

Computer engineering technology, BS degree, typical course sequence (semesters), effective fall 2013

CourseSem. Cr. Hrs.
First Year
MATH-171 LAS Perspective 7A: Calculus A 3
EEET-111 DC Circuits 3
EEET-112 DC Circuits Lab 1
CPET-141 Digital Fundamentals 2
CPET-142 Digital Fundamentals Lab 1
  LAS Perspective 1, 2 6
  LAS Foundation 1: First-Year Seminar 3
MATH-172 LAS Perspective 7B: Calculus B 3
EEET-121 AC Circuits 3
EEET-122 AC Circuits Lab 1
CPET-121 Computational Problem Solving I 3
ENGL-150 LAS Foundation 2: Writing Seminar  3
  Wellness Education* 0
Second Year
MATH-173 Calculus C 3
EEET-211 Electronics I 3
EEET-212 Electronics I Lab 1
CPET-201 Microcontroller Systems  2
CPET-202 Microcontroller Systems Lab 1
  LAS Perspective 3, 4 6
CHMG-141 LAS Perspective 5: General and Analytical Chemistry I 3
CHMG-145 LAS Perspective 5: General and Analytical Chemistry I Lab 1
MATH-211 Calculus and DEQ 3
EEET-221 Electronics II 2
EEET-222 Electronics II Lab 1
CPET-241 Digital Systems Design 3
CPET-242 Digital Systems Design Lab 1
STAT-145 Introduction to Statistics I 3
Third Year
PHYS-111 LAS Perspective 6: College Physics I 4
EEET-321 Signals Systems and Transforms 4
CPET-341 Hardware Description Language 2
CPET-342 Hardware Description Language Lab 1
CPET-321 Computational Problem Solving II 3
  LAS Immersion 1 3
EEET-299 Career Orientation 0
CPET-499 Cooperative Education Co-op
Fourth Year
CPET-481 Networking Technologies 3
EEET-425 Digital Signal Processing 4
EEET-421 Design and Innovation (WI) 3
  LAS Immersion 2, 3 6
  Technical Electives  6
MFET-436 Engineering Economics 3
CPET-561 Embedded Systems Design I 4
CPET-461 Real Time Operating Systems 3
CPET-499 Cooperative Education Co-op
Fifth Year
CPET-499 Cooperative Education Co-op
CPET-563 Embedded Systems Design II 3
  General Education Electives 6
  Free Electives 6
Total Semester Credit Hours 129

Please see New General Education Curriculum–Liberal Arts and Sciences (LAS) for more information.

(WI) Refers to a writing intensive course within the major.

* Please see Wellness Education Requirement for more information.

Electives

There is a need in the computer industry for professionals with diversified areas of expertise. The program requires a three-course professional concentration sequence that allows students to customize their education yet ensures depth of knowledge in a subject matter beyond the core curriculum. Concentrations are offered in computer science, systems administration, IT wireless networks, telecommunications, and communications systems.

Computer science

4003-263 Computer Science for Transfers
4003-450 Programming Language Concepts
4003-440 Operating Systems I

Systems administration

4050-402 OS Scripting
4050-421 Systems Administration I
4050-516 Network Services

IT wireless networks

4050-351 Network Fundamentals
4050-403 Concepts of Wireless Networking
4050-413 Applications of Wireless Networks

Telecommunications

0614-271 Telecommunications Fundamentals
0614-465,466 Voice Communications Technology
0614-475 Switching Technologies

Communication systems

0609-363 Electronics IV
0609-534 Communication Systems I
0609-547 Digital Signal Processing

In addition to the professional concentration electives, the curriculum has three free electives that may be used to pursue minors, to provide additional technical expertise for greater career specialization, or to explore courses that fulfill personal interests.

Accelerated dual degree option

The program, in conjunction with the department of computer science in the B. Thomas Golisano College of Computing and Information Sciences, offers an accelerated dual degree option that combines the bachelor’s degree in computer engineering technology and a master’s degree in computer science in a cohesive, five-year curriculum.

Applications to this program are accepted from matriculated undergraduate computer engineering technology students who have completed all the courses in the first five quarters of the baccalaureate program and have maintained a cumulative grade-point average of at least 3.4 (out of 4.0). At least 55 quarter credit hours must have been earned at RIT. This program requires the maintenance of at least a 3.0 cumulative grade-point average and at least a 3.0 in the 45 quarter credit hours directly applicable to the master of science degree.