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Computing Security BS

Bo Yuan, Chair
(585) 475-7941, bo.yuan@rit.edu

http://www.csec.rit.edu/

Program overview

The scope of computer networks and the span of these systems increases in organizations every day. At the same time, industry and society's dependence on these technologies is growing, as is the creation of damaging software that attacks computing systems and networks. Therefore, security has become a major concern. The result is an increased need for people and technologies that can secure and protect from attack the data assets of an organization as well as the hardware and software infrastructures that house the information.

The BS degree in computing security produces professionals who understand people and processes that impact information security. In addition to possessing state-of-the-art knowledge in the preservation of information assets, students become experts in the identification of computer security vulnerabilities. Students also understand the forensic requirements needed to prove an attack occurred, identify its origin, assess the extent of the damage or loss of information, and design strategies that ensure data can be recovered.

An important goal is to provide students with a level of specialization in computing security beyond what is provided by more general majors offered in information systems or information technology. This is accomplished by providing a foundation that includes a breadth of computing disciplines and then allows the student to focus on a particular area of security such as forensics, mobile device forensics, or network or computing system security. Favoring depth over breadth, students are allowed sufficient time to explore the issues and technologies of computer and network security.

Curriculum

Students are required to complete 126 semester credit hours of core courses, advanced courses, and cooperative education. Core courses include a programming sequence, an ethics course, a computer networking and system administration sequence, and foundation courses in computer and network security. Advanced courses allow students to design the focus of their information security course work.

Advanced electives

Students complete five advanced security electives that expand students' knowledge in one of several disciplines of security, including system security, network security, forensics, malware, secure software development, database and application security, security evaluation, or theory.

Computing security, BS degree, typical course sequence

Course Sem. Cr. Hrs.
First Year
CSEC-101 Fundamentals of Computing Security 3
CSCI-141, 142 Computer Science I, II 8
  LAS Foundation 1: First Year Seminar† 3
MATH-181, 182 Project-based Calculus I, II 8
  LAS Perspective 1, 3 6
  LAS Foundation 2: First Year Writing 3
MATH-190 Discrete Mathematics for Computing 3
  YearOne 0
  Wellness Education* 0
Second Year
CSCI-243 The Mechanics of Programming 3
MATH-251 Probability and Statistics I 3
ISTE-230 Introduction to Database and Data Modeling 3
CSCI-250 Concepts of Computer Systems 3
NSSA-221 System Administration 3
MATH-241 Linear Algebra 3
PHYS-211, 212 LAS Perspective 6: University Physics I, II 8
NSSA-220 Introduction to Scripting 3
  LAS Perspective 2 3
  Cooperative Education (summer) Co-op
Third Year
CSCI-462 Introduction to Cryptography 3
CSEC-363 Cyber Security Policy and Law 3
NSSA-241 Networking I 3
  LAS Perspective 4, 5 6
  LAS Immersion 1 (WI) 3
CSEC-472 Authentication and Security Models 3
  Program Electives 6
  Free Elective 3
  Cooperative Education (summer) Co-op
Fourth Year
  Program Electives 12
  LAS Immersion 2, 3 6
  Free Electives 9
CSEC-490 Capstone in Computing Security 3
Total Semester Credit Hours 126

Please see New General Education Curriculum–Liberal Arts and Sciences (LAS) for more information.

(WI) Refers to a writing intensive course within the major.

* Please see Wellness Education Requirement for more information. Students completing bachelor's degrees are required to complete two Wellness courses.

† The First Year Seminar requirement is replaced by an LAS Elective for the 2014-15 academic year.

Accelerated dual degree option

An accelerated dual degree option is available for outstanding undergraduate students who wish to earn both a bachelor's and a master's degree in approximately six years.

Computing security, BS/MS degree, typical course sequence

Course Sem. Cr. Hrs.
First Year
CSEC-101 Fundamentals of Computing Security 3
CSCI-141, 142 Computer Science I, II 8
  LAS Foundation 1: First Year Seminar† 3
MATH-181, 182 Project-based Calculus I, II 8
  LAS Perspective 1, 3 6
  LAS Foundation 2: First Year Writing 3
MATH-190 Discrete Mathematics for Computing 3
  YearOne 0
  Wellness Education* 0
Second Year
CSCI-243 The Mechanics of Programming 3
MATH-251   Probablilty and Statistics I   3
ISTE-230   Introduction to Database and Data Modeling   3
CSCI-250 Concepts of Computer Systems 3
MATH-241 Linear Algebra 3
PHYS-211, 212 LAS Perspective 6: University Physics I, II 8
NSSA-221 System Administration 3
NSSA-220 Task Automation Using Interpretive Languages 3
  LAS Perspective 2 3
  Cooperative Education (summer) Co-op
Third Year
CSCI-462 Introduction to Cryptography 3
CSEC-363 Cyber Security Policy and Law 3
NSSA-241 Introduction to Routing and Switching 3
NSSA-221 System Administration 3
  LAS Perspective 4, 5 6
  LAS Immersion I (WI) 3
CSEC-472 Authentication and Security Models 3
  Program Elective 3
  Free Elective 3
  Graduate Elective 3
  Cooperative Education (summer) Co-op
Fourth Year
  Program Electives 6
  LAS Immersion 2, 3 6
  Free Electives 9
CSEC-490 Capstone in Computing Security 3      
  Graduate Electives 6
Fifth Year
CSEC-601 Research Methods and Proposal Development 3
CSEC-603 Enterprise Security and Forensics 3
CSEC-604 Cryptography and Authentication 3
  Graduate Electives 6
  CSEC Thesis 6
Total Semester Credit Hours 156§

Please see New General Education Curriculum–Liberal Arts and Sciences (LAS) for more information.

(WI) Refers to a writing intensive course within the major.

* Please see Wellness Education Requirement for more information. Students completing bachelor's degrees are required to complete two Wellness courses.

† The First Year Seminar requirement is replaced by an LAS Elective for the 2014-15 academic year.

§ The BS degree requires 126 semester hours. The MS degree requires 30 semester hours. Students use 9 semester hours of computing security graduate electives toward both degrees.

Additional information

Cooperative education

Cooperative education is a required component of the major. Co-op enables students to work in a variety of organizations, from small- or medium-sized businesses to large international companies or law enforcement organizations, that require computer systems or computer networks. These may be security-centric businesses (law enforcement agencies, security auditors) to users of information technology (manufacturing companies, school districts, health care). Co-ops provide real-world experience and a competitive edge when applying for jobs after graduation. Typically, the first co-op occurs during the summer following the second year. The remaining co-ops may occur during the student's third year or the following summer. Students must complete the co-op requirement prior to completing their course work.

Part-time study

The major is available on a part-time basis. Courses can be completed during the day and in the evening to accommodate those who work, regardless of their schedules. Please refer to the Part-time Study website for more information on this option.

[arrow] Click to view program requirements in the Quarter Calendar

Quarter Curriculum - For Reference Only

Effective fall 2013, RIT will convert its academic calendar from quarters to semesters. The following content has been made available as reference only. Currently matriculated students who began their academic programs in quarters should consult their academic adviser for guidance and course selection.

Program overview

The scope of computer networks and the span of these systems increases in organizations every day. At the same time, industry and society's dependence on these technologies is growing, as is the creation of damaging software that attacks computing systems and networks. Therefore, security has become a major concern. The result is an increased need for people and technologies that can secure and protect from attack the data assets of an organization as well as the hardware and software infrastructures that house the information.

The BS degree in information security and forensics produces professionals who understand people and processes that impact information security. In addition to possessing state-of-the-art knowledge in the preservation of information assets, students become experts in the identification of computer security vulnerabilities. Students also understand the forensic requirements needed to prove an attack occurred, identify its origin, assess the extent of the damage or loss of information, and design strategies that ensure data can be recovered.

An important goal of the program is to provide students with a level of specialization in information security and forensics beyond what is provided by more general programs offered in information systems or information technology. The program accomplishes this by providing a foundation which includes the breadth of computing disciplines and then allows the student to focus in a particular area of security such as forensics, mobile device forensics, network or computing system security. Favoring depth over breadth, students are allowed sufficient time to explore the issues and technologies of computer and network security.

Curriculum

The program requires students to complete 182 quarter credit hours and includes core courses and advanced courses. The core includes a programming sequence, an ethics course, a computer networking and system administration sequence, and foundation courses in computer and network security. Advanced courses allow students to design the focus of their information security course work.

Advanced tracks

Students select one of the following two tracks. Before beginning either track, they must successfully complete Ethics in Information Technology (4002-415).

Network and Wireless Security

4050-517 Network Forensics and Security
4050-523 Security of Wireless Networks
4050-525 Wireless Ad-hoc and Sensor Network Security
4050-585 Networks and System Security Audits

Computer System Security

4050-422 System Administration II
4050-580 Computer System Security
4050-581 Computer System Forensics
4050-585 Networks and System Security Audits

Semester conversion
Effective fall 2013, RIT will convert its academic calendar from quarters to semesters. Each program and its associated courses have been sent to the New York State Department of Education for approval of the semester plan. For reference, the following charts illustrate the typical course sequence for this program in both quarters and semesters. Students should consult their academic advisers with questions regarding planning and course selection.

Information security and forensics, BS degree, typical course sequence (quarters)

CourseQtr. Cr. Hrs.
First Year
4050-202 Introduction to UNIX/Linux Seminar 1
1105-051, 052 First-Year Enrichment 2
4050-220 Cyber Self-Defense 4
4002-208, 210 C++ Programming I, II 8
4050-350 Computer System Fundamentals 4
4050-351 Network Fundamentals 4
1016-204 College Algebra 4
1016-205, 206 Discrete Math for Technologists I, II 8
  Liberal Arts* 16
Second Year
4050-413 Application of Wireless Networks 4
4050-302 Scripting in Perl 4
4050-212 Client/Server Programming 4
4050-360 Information Security Policies 4
4050-515 Introduction to Routing and Switching 4
4050-421 System Administration I 4
4050-365 Cryptography and Authentication 4
1016-319 Data Analysis 4
  Lab Science Electives 8
  Liberal Arts* 8
  Wellness Education† 0
4050-203 Co-op Preparation Seminar 1
Third and Fourth Years
  Cooperative Education§ Co-op
4050-460 Introduction to Computer Malware 4
4050-516 Network Services 4
4002-415 Ethics in Information Technology 4
4002-455 Needs Assessment 4
  Advanced Track Courses‡ 16
  Liberal Arts* 12
  Free Electives 20
  Communications Elective 4
  General Education Electives 14
  Wellness Education† 0
Total Quarter Credit Hours 182

* Please see Liberal Arts General Education Requirements for more information.
† Please see Wellness Education for more information.
‡ A four-course advanced track is required. Students must complete either the networking security track or the computer system security track.
§ Three quarters of cooperatuve education are required after the second year.

Information security and forensics, BS degree, typical course sequence (semesters), effective fall 2013

CourseSem. Cr. Hrs.
First Year
NSSA-101 NSSA Fundamentals 3
ISTE-100 Computer Problem Solving: Network Dom I 4
  LAS Foundation1: First Year Seminar 3
STAT-145 Introduction to Statistics I 3
  LAS Perspective 1, 2 6
NSSA-102 Computer Systems Concepts 3
NSSA-161 Fundamentals of Information Security 3
ISTE-101 Computer Problem Solving: Network Dom II 4
ENGL-150 LAS Foundation 2: Writing Seminar 3
  Wellness Education* 0
Second Year
NSSA-241 Networking I 3
NSSA-362 Cryptography and Authentication 3
ISTE-230 Introduction to Database and Data Modeling 3
PHYS-111 College Physics I 4
  LAS Perspective 3, 4 6
NSSA-242 Networking II 3
NSSA-243 Networking Lab 3
NSSA-363 Cyber Security Policy and Law 3
PHYS-112 College Physics II 4
Third Year
NSSA-220 Introduction to Scripting 3
  ISF Advanced Elective 1, 2 6
MATH-181 Project-Based Calculus I 4
  Ethics Elective 3
  LAS Perspective 5† 3
NSSA-221 Systems Administration I 3
MATH-182 Project-Based Calculus II 4
  LAS Immersion 1 3
  Free Elective 1 3
  Cooperative Education (summer) Co-op
Fourth Year
NSSA-322 Systems Administration II (WI) 3
NSSA-323 Systems Administration Lab (WI) 3
  ISF Advanced Elective 3, 4, 5 9
  LAS Immersion 2, 3 6
  Free Elective 2, 3, 4 9
Total Semester Credit Hours 126

Please see New General Education Curriculum–Liberal Arts and Sciences (LAS) for more information.
(WI) Refers to a writing intensive course within the major.
* Please see Wellness Education Requirement for more information.
† Students will satify this requirement by taking either a 3 or 4 credit hour lab science course. If a science course consists of separate lecture and laboratory sections, students must take both the lecture and the lab portions to fulfill the requirement.

Additional information

Cooperative education

Students complete three quarters of cooperative education, which enables them to work in a variety of organizations, from small- or medium-sized businesses to large international companies or law enforcement organizations, that require computer systems or computer networks. These may be security-centric businesses (law enforcement agencies, security auditors) to users of information technology (manufacturing companies, school districts, health care). Completing a co-op provides real-world experience and an edge when applying for jobs after graduation. Typically, the first co-op occurs during the summer following the second year. The remaining co-ops may occur during the student's third year or the following summer. Students must complete the co-op requirement prior to completing their course work.

Part-time study

The program is available on a part-time basis. Courses can be completed during the day and in the evening to accommodate those who work, regardless of their schedules. The typical evening student requires 26 quarters to complete the BS degree. Please refer to the Part-time Study website (rit.edu/ptgrad/parttime) for more information on this option.