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Electrical Engineering BS

Sohail Dianat, Department Head
(585) 475-6740, sadeee@rit.edu

http://www.rit.edu/kgcoe/eme/

Program overview

Electrical engineering addresses the high-technology needs of business and industry by offering a rich academic program that includes analog and digital integrated circuits, digital signal processing, radiation and propagation, power electronics, control systems, communications, circuit theory, computer architecture, computer-aided design, embedded systems, solid-state devices, microelectromechanical systems (MEMs), and robotics.

The major prepares students for exciting careers within the varied electrical engineering and allied disciplines and for positions in business management. Graduates also have the foundation to pursue advanced study at the most prestigious graduate schools.

The curriculum, co-op program, and facilities are designed to accomplish the program’s educational objectives. Since the ability to design is an essential part of electrical engineering, students are presented with challenging design problems in a number of courses, beginning with Freshman Practicum (EEEE-105) in the first year.

To strengthen students’ applied knowledge, laboratories are an integral part of many courses. The department offers a number of classes in studio-style lecture labs, where the instructor presents the lecture in a fully instrumented room that allows immediate observation and implementation of important engineering ideas. Many of our alumni report that the college’s facilities are comparable to the best in the industry.

A highlight of the applied engineering experience is the senior project. Students work on a challenging project under the tutelage of an experienced faculty adviser. While experiencing the satisfaction of completing an interesting project and exploring the latest in technology, students develop engineering management and project organization skills, learn to communicate their ideas effectively within a multidisciplinary team, and present their project and ideas to a diverse audience of students, faculty, and industrial partners.

Educational objectives

The electrical engineering faculty, in conjunction with its constituents, have established the following educational objectives. Graduates will:

  • Have a strong foundation in mathematics and basic sciences, and core electrical engineering fundamental knowledge and abilities necessary for specialization in all areas of electrical engineering.
  • Develop problem solving and design skills for devising and evaluating solutions to electrical engineering problems, including design of components, systems, and experiments.
  • Be well-informed about present and emerging technologies significant to electrical engineering.
  • Be well-prepared for graduate education.
  • Embrace and foster an environment that encourages creativity and enthusiasm for life-long learning.
  • Develop professional attributes that include communication skills, teamwork, ethics, and an appreciation for other disciplines, both technical and non-technical, in order to deal with the impact of technology in a global, societal, and organizational context.

Accreditation

The BS in electrical engineering program is accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of ABET, http://www.abet.org.

Curriculum

The first two years of the curriculum are devoted to establishing a foundation in mathematics and the physical science, which is essential to the study of electrical engineering. In other courses, students learn about electrical engineering principles such as circuits and digital systems. Practicum courses introduce students to electrical engineering practice and computer-aided design (CAD) tools that are used throughout the five-year program.

In the third and fourth years, students focus on the subjects that form the core of electrical engineering. Courses in circuits, electronics, linear systems, electromagnetic fields, semiconductor devices, communication systems, control systems, and microelectromechanical systems are taught.

During the fifth year, students specialize in an area of professional interest. They complete a senior design project as part of the graduation requirements.

Electrical engineering, BS degree, typical course sequence

Course Sem. Cr. Hrs.
First Year
MATH-181, 182 Project-Based Calculus I, II 8
CHMG-131 General Chemistry for Engineers 3
  LAS Foundation 1: First Year Seminar† 3
EEEE-105  Freshman Practicum 1
  LAS Foundation 2: First Year Writing 3
  LAS Perspective 1, 2, 3 9
PHYS-211 University Physics I 4
EEEE-120 Digital Systems I 3
  YearOne 0
  Wellness Education* 0
Second Year
MATH-221  Multivariable and Vector Calculus 4
PHYS-212 University Physics II 4
CMPR-271 Computational Problem Solving for Engineers 3
EEEE-281 Circuits I 3
  LAS Perspective 4 3
MATH-231 Differential Equations 3
EEEE-260 Semiconductor Devices 3
EEEE-282 Circuits II 3
EEEE-220 Digital Systems II 3
  Restricted Science Elective 3
EGEN-099 Engineering Co-op Preparation 0
Third Year
MATH-381 Complex Variables 3
EEEE-374 Electromagnetic Fields and Transmission Lines 4
EEEE-353 Linear Systems 4
EEEE-381 Electronics I 3
  LAS Immersion 1 3
  Cooperative Education (spring) Co-op
Fourth Year
MATH-251 Probability and Statistics I 3
EEEE-420 Embedded Systems Design 3
EEEE-414 Classical Control 3
EEEE-482 Electronics II 4
  Free Elective 3
  Cooperative Education (spring) Co-op
Fifth Year
EEEE-484 Communication Systems (WI) 3
EEEE-497 Senior Design I 3
EEEE-483 Mechatronics 3
  Professional Electives 9
  LAS Immersion 2, 3 6
EEEE-498 Senior Design II 3
  Free Elective 3
Total Semester Credit Hours 129

Please see New General Education Curriculum–Liberal Arts and Sciences (LAS) for more information.

(WI) Refers to a writing intensive course within the major.

* Please see Wellness Education Requirement for more information. Students completing bachelor's degrees are required to complete two Wellness courses.

† The First Year Seminar requirement is replaced by an LAS Elective for the 2014-15 academic year.

Focus areas

Students may develop a focus area in one of four options. Students complete all the required courses for the BS in electrical engineering and choose their free and professional electives from a specified set of courses in one of the following areas.

Clean and renewable energy option

Because of the environmental impact, it has become critical that electrical energy be developed from sources that do not pollute the atmosphere, preferably from renewable sources like wind and solar energy. It is equally important that existing electrical generation and distribution systems become more efficient. In the future, research and development in clean and renewable energy will grow at a rate much faster than other areas. Both industry and the federal government are increasing their efforts and financial investment in this area.

Computer engineering option

The computer engineering option is ideal for students interested in designing modern computing systems. Students gain knowledge in areas ranging from C programming, object-oriented programming, assembly language, microprocessor interfacing, and logic design to data structures and computer operating systems.

Robotics option

The robotics option provides students with the theoretical and practical skills required to design robots and robotic devices. Students study advanced programming, robotic systems, principles of robotics, advanced robotics, kinematics and dynamics of robotics manipulators, mobile robots, locomotion types, and complete experiments using various arm and mobile robots. Advanced robotics courses include the dynamics of manipulators and the dynamics of mobile robots with advanced locomotion techniques and path planning.

Wireless communication option

The wireless communications option is ideal for those who want to incorporate the theoretical and practical skills required for understanding, designing, and evaluating wireless communication systems. Wireless communications is a critical enabling technology for many modern products and services. Examples include: mobile telephony, remote Internet access, consumer electronics, medical devices, and location-based services. Students in the wireless communications option take an introductory course addressing wireless communications from a systems perspective. The course covers modern products and services enabled via wireless communication. In the two years that follow, students take a course sequence covering analog communication, digital data communication, and communication over wireless channels. This sequence builds a core of knowledge in the transmission of signals to carry information wirelessly in various practical scenarios. The sequence is complemented with a course covering basic principles in communication networks and the Internet.

Accelerated dual degree option

An accelerated dual degree (BS/MS) option requires the successful completion of at least 150 semester credit hours of undergraduate and graduate study in electrical engineering. Students focus on one of the following areas during the graduate portion of the dual degree: communication, control, digital systems, electromagnetic/microwaves, integrated electronics, MEMS, or signal and image processing.

Students may apply to the BS/MS option in the second semester of their second year, providing that a minimum cumulative grade point average of 3.4 has been obtained at the end of the previous semester.

Electrical engineering, BS/MS degree, typical course sequence

Course Sem. Cr. Hrs.
First Year
EEEE-105 Freshman Practicum 1
MATH-181, 182 Project-Based Calculus I, II 8
CHMG-131 General Chemistry for Engineers 3
  LAS Foundation 1: First Year Seminar† 3
  LAS Foundation 2: First Year Writing 3
  LAS Perspective 1, 2, 3 9
PHYS-211 University Physics I 4
EEEE-120 Digital Systems I 3
  YearOne 0
  Wellness Education* 0
Second Year
MATH-221 Multivariable and Vector Calculus 4
PHYS-212 University Physics II 4
CMPR-271 Computational  Problem Solving for Engineers 3
EEEE-281, 282 Circuits I, II 6
  LAS Perspective 4 3
MATH-231 Differential Equations 3
EEEE-260 Semiconductor Devices 3
EEEE-220 Digital Systems II 3
  Restricted Science Elective 3
EGEN-099 Engineering Co-op Preparation 0
Third Year
  Cooperative Education (fall) Co-op
MATH-381 Complex Variables 3
EEEE-374 EM Fields and Trans Lines 4
EEEE-353 Linear Systems 4
EEEE-381 Electronics I 3
  LAS Immersion I 3
Fourth Year
MATH-251 Probability and Statistics I 3
EEEE-420 Embedded Systems Design 3
EEEE-414 Classical Control 3
EEEE-482 Electronics II 4
  Free Elective 3
EEEE-484 Communication Systems (WI) 3
EEEE-483 Mechatronics 3
  LAS Immersion 2 3
EEEE-602 Random Signals and Noise 3
EEEE-603 Matrix Methods in Electrical Engineering 3
EEEE-790 MS Thesis 3
Fifth Year
EEEE-497, 498 Senior Design I, II 6
  Professional Electives 9
  LAS Immersion 3 3
  Graduate Electives 9
EEEE-790 MS Thesis 3
  Free Elective 3
Total Semester Credit Hours 150

Please see New General Education Curriculum–Liberal Arts and Sciences (LAS) for more information.

(WI) Refers to a writing intensive course within the major.

* Please see Wellness Education Requirement for more information. Students completing bachelor's degrees are required to complete two Wellness courses.

† The First Year Seminar requirement is replaced by an LAS Elective for the 2014-15 academic year.

[arrow] Click to view program requirements in the Quarter Calendar

Quarter Curriculum - For Reference Only

Effective fall 2013, RIT will convert its academic calendar from quarters to semesters. The following content has been made available as reference only. Currently matriculated students who began their academic programs in quarters should consult their academic adviser for guidance and course selection.

Program overview

Educational objectives

The electrical engineering faculty, in conjunction with its constituents, have established the following educational objectives. Graduates will:

  • Have a strong foundation in mathematics and basic sciences, and core electrical engineering fundamental knowledge and abilities necessary for specialization in all areas of electrical engineering.
  • Develop problem solving and design skills for devising and evaluating solutions to electrical engineering problems, including design of components, systems, and experiments.
  • Be well-informed about present and emerging technologies significant to electrical engineering.
  • Be well-prepared for graduate education.
  • Embrace and foster an environment that encourages creativity and enthusiasm for life-long learning.
  • Develop professional attributes that include communication skills, teamwork, ethics, and an appreciation for other disciplines, both technical and non-technical, in order to deal with the impact of technology in a global, societal, and organizational context.

Electrical engineering addresses the high-technology needs of business and industry by offering a rich academic program that includes analog and digital integrated circuits, digital signal and image processing, microwave electronics, optical electronics, bioelectronics, radiation and propagation, power electronics, control systems, communications and information theory, circuit theory, computer-aided design, solid-state devices, microelectromechanical systems (MEMs), robotics, and pattern recognition. Our nationally recognized program combines the rigor of theory with the reality of engineering practice.

The program prepares students for exciting careers within the varied electrical engineering and allied disciplines and for positions in business management. Graduates also have the foundation to pursue advanced study at the most prestigious graduate schools.

The curriculum, co-op program, and facilities are designed to accomplish the program’s educational objectives. Since the ability to design is an essential part of electrical engineering, students are presented with challenging design problems in a number of courses, beginning with Electrical Engineering Practicum (0301-205) in the freshman year.

To strengthen students’ applied knowledge, laboratories are an integral part of many courses. The department offers a number of classes in studio-style lecture labs, where the instructor presents the lecture in a fully instrumented room that allows immediate observation and implementation of important engineering ideas. Many of our alumni report that the college’s facilities are comparable to the best in the industry.

The highlight of the applied engineering experience is the senior project. Students work on a challenging project under the tutelage of an experienced faculty adviser. While experiencing the satisfaction of completing an interesting project and exploring the latest in technology, students develop engineering management and project organization skills, learn to communicate their ideas effectively within a multidisciplinary team, and present their project and ideas to a diverse audience of students, faculty, and industrial partners.

The first two years of the curriculum are devoted to establishing a foundation in mathematics and physical science that is essential to the study of electrical engineering. In other courses, students learn about electrical engineering principles such as circuits and digital systems. The practicum courses introduce students to electrical engineering practice and computer-aided design (CAD) tools that are used throughout the five-year program.

In the third and fourth years, students focus on the subjects that form the core of electrical engineering. Courses in circuits, electronics, linear systems, electromagnetic fields, semiconductor devices, communication systems, control systems, and microelectromechanical systems are taught.

During the fifth year, students specialize in an area of their professional interest. They complete a senior design project as part of the graduation requirements.

Curriculum

Semester conversion
Effective fall 2013, RIT will convert its academic calendar from quarters to semesters. Each program and its associated courses have been sent to the New York State Department of Education for approval of the semester plan. For reference, the following charts illustrate the typical course sequence for this program in both quarters and semesters. Students should consult their academic advisers with questions regarding planning and course selection.

Electrical engineering, BS degree, typical course sequence (quarters)

CourseQtr. Cr. Hrs.
First Year
0301-205 Electrical Engineering Freshman Practicum 1
0301-240 Digital Systems 4
1011-208 College Chemistry I 4
1016-281, 282, 283 Calculus I, II, III 12
1017-311, 312 University Physics I, II 10
  Liberal Arts* 20
  Wellness Education† 0
1720-050, 051 Discovery 1
1720-052 Pathways‡ 1
Second Year
0301-360 Semiconductor Devices 4
0301-365 Microcomputer Systems 4
0301-381, 382 Circuits I, II with Lab 8
1016-305 Multivariable Calculus 4
1016-306 Differential Equations 4
1016-328 Engineering Mathematics 4
1017-313 University Physics III 4
Choose one of the following courses: 4
    0301-370    Nano Science and Technology or  
    1017-314    Modern Physics I  4
  Liberal Arts* 4
  Free Elective 4
4001-211 Introduction to Programming C & MATLAB 3
Third Year
0301-453, 554 Linear Systems I, II 8
0301-473, 474 Electromagnetic Fields I, II 9
0301-481, 482 Electronics I, II with Lab 8
1016-420 Complex Variables 4
  Free Elective 4
  Cooperative Education§ Co-op
Fourth Year
1016-345 Probability and Statistics for Engineers 4
0301-347 Computer Architecture 4
0301-514 Control Systems Design 5
0301-534 Communication Systems 4
0301-545 Digital Electronics 4
  Free Elective 4
  Liberal Arts* 4
  Cooperative Education§ Co-op
0301-497 Individual Design 3
Fifth Year
0301-531 Mechatronics 4
  Professional Electives 12
0301-697, 698 Senior Design Project I, II 8
  Liberal Arts* 8
  Cooperative Education§ Co-op
Total Quarter Credit Hours 197

* Please see Liberal Arts General Education Requirements for more information.

† Please see Wellness Education Requirement for more information.

‡ Students are required to complete one Pathways course. Students may choose from Innovation/Creativity (1720-052), Leadership (1720-053), or Service (1720-054). These courses may be completed in the winter or spring quarter.

§ Students are required to complete five quarters of cooperative education.

Electrical engineering, BS degree, typical course sequence (semesters), effective fall 2013

CourseSem. Cr. Hrs.
First Year
MATH-181 Project-Based Calculus I 4
CHMG-131 General Chemistry for Engineering 3
ENGL-150 LAS Foundation: Writing Seminar 3
EEEE-105  Freshman Practicum 1
  LAS Foundation: First-Year Seminar 3
  LAS Perspective 1, 2, 3 9
MATH-182  Project-Based Calculus II 4
PHYS-211 University Physics I 4
EEEE-120 Digital Systems I 3
  Wellness Education* 0
Second Year
MATH-221  Project-Based Calculus III 4
PHYS-212 University Physics II 4
CMPR-211 Computer Problem Solving for Engineers 3
EEEE-281 Circuits I 3
  LAS Perspective 4 3
MATH-231 Differential Equations 3
EEEE-260 Semiconductor Devices 3
EEEE-282 Circuits II 3
EEEE-220 Digital Systems II 3
  Restricted Science Elective 3
Third Year
MATH-381 Complex Variables 3
EEEE-374 Electromagnetic Fields and Transmission Lines 4
EEEE-353 Linear Systems 4
EEEE-381 Electronics I 3
  LAS Immersion 1 3
  Cooperative Education (spring) Co-op
Fourth Year
MATH-251 Probability and Statistics I 3
EEEE-420 Embedded Systems Design 3
EEEE-414 Control Systems Design 3
EEEE-482 Electronics II 4
  Free Elective 3
  Cooperative Education (spring) Co-op
Fifth Year
EEEE-484 Communication Systems (WI) 3
EEEE-497 Senior Design I 3
EEEE-483 Mechatronics 3
  Professional Electives 9
  LAS Immersion 2, 3 6
EEEE-498 Senior Design II 3
  Free Elective 3
Total Semester Credit Hours 129

Please see New General Education Curriculum–Liberal Arts and Sciences (LAS) for more information.

(WI) Refers to a writing intensive course within the major.

* Please see Wellness Education Requirement for more information.

Focus areas

Students may develop a focus area in one of four options. Students complete all the required courses for the BS in electrical engineering and choose their free and professional electives from a specified set of courses in one of the following areas.

Clean and renewable energy option

Because of the environmental impact, it has become critical that electrical energy be developed from sources that do not pollute the atmosphere, preferably from renewable sources like wind and solar energy. It is equally important that existing electrical generation and distribution systems become more efficient. In the future, research and development in clean and renewable energy will grow at a rate much faster than other areas. Both industry and the federal government are increasing their efforts and financial investment in this area.

Computer engineering option

The computer engineering option is ideal for students interested designing modern computing systems. Students gain knowledge in areas ranging from C programming, object-oriented programming, assembly language, microprocessor interfacing, and logic design to data structures and computer operating systems.

Robotics option

The robotics option provides students with the theoretical and practical skills required to design robots and robotics devices. Students will study advanced programming, robotics systems, principles of robotics, advanced robotics, kinematics and dynamics of robotics manipulators, mobile robots, locomotion types, and will complete experiments using various arm and mobile robots. Advanced robotics courses include the dynamics of manipulators and the dynamics of mobile robots with advanced locomotion techniques and path planning.

Accelerated dual degree program

An accelerated dual degree (BS/MS) program requires the successful completion of at least 232 quarter credit hours of undergraduate and graduate study in electrical engineering. Students focus on one of the following areas during the graduate portion of their dual degree: communication, control, digital systems, electromagnetic/microwaves, integrated electronics, or signal and image processing.

Students may apply to this program in the second quarter of their second year, providing that a minimum cumulative grade point average of 3.4 has been obtained at the end of the previous quarter. Although admission requirements are stricter for this program, graduation requirements are consistent with university policies.

Electrical engineering, BS/MS degree, typical course sequence (quarters)

CourseQtr. Cr. Hrs.
First Year
0301-205 Electrical Engineering Freshman Practicum 1
0301-240 Digital Systems 4
1011-208 College Chemistry I 4
1016-281, 282, 283 Calculus I, II, III 12
1017-311, 312 University Physics I, II 10
  Liberal Arts* 20
  Wellness Education† 0
1720-050, 051 Discovery 1
1720-052 Pathways‡ 1
Second Year
0301-360 Semiconductor Devices 4
0301-365 Microcomputer Systems 4
0301-381, 382 Circuits I, II with Lab 8
1016-305 Multivariable Calculus 4
1016-306 Differential Equations 4
1016-328 Engineering Mathematics 4
1017-313 University Physics III 4
Choose one of the following courses: 4
    0301-370    Nano Science and Technology  
    1017-314    Modern Physics I  4
  Liberal Arts* 4
  Free Elective 4
4001-211 Introduction to Programming C & MATLAB 3
Third Year
0301-453, 554 Linear Systems I, II 8
0301-473, 474 Electromagnetic Fields I, II 9
0301-481, 482 Electronics I, II with Lab 8
1016-420 Complex Variables 4
  Free Elective 4
  Cooperative Education§ Co-op
Fourth Year
1016-314 Engineering Statistics 4
0301-347 Computer Architecture 4
  Liberal Arts* 4
0301-534 Communication Systems 5
0301-703 Matrix Methids in Electrical Engineering 4
0301-514 Control Systems Design 5
0301-545 Digital Electronics 4
0301-702 Random Signals and Noise 4
  Professional Electives 12
0301-890 Thesis 2
  Cooperative Education Co-op
Fifth Year
  Graduate Courses 20
0301-531 Mechatronics 4
  Professional Elective 4
0301-697, 698 Senior Design i, II 8
  Liberal Arts* 8
0301-890 Thesis 7
  Cooperative Education Co-op
Total Quarter Credit Hours 232

* Please see Liberal Arts General Education Requirements for more information.

† Please see Wellness Education Requirement for more information.

‡ Students are required to complete one Pathways course. Students may choose from Innovation/Creativity (1720-052), Leadership (1720-053), or Service (1720-054). These courses may be completed in the winter or spring quarter.

Electrical engineering, BS/MS degree, typical course sequence (semesters), effective fall 2013

CourseSem. Cr. Hrs.
First Year
MATH-181 Project-Based Calculus I 4
CHMG-131 General Chemistry for Engineers 3
ENGL-150 LAS Foundation 2: Writing Seminar 3
EEEE-105 LAS Foundation 1: First-Year Seminar 1
  LAS Perspective 1, 2, 3 9
MATH-182 Project-Based Calculus II 4
PHYS-211 University Physics I 4
EEEE-120 Digital Systems I 3
  Wellness Education* 0
Second Year
MATH-221 Multivariable and Vector Calculus 4
PHYS-212 University Physics II 4
CMPR-271 Computer Problem Solving for Engineers 3
EEEE-281 Circuits I 3
  LAS Perspective 4 3
MATH-231 Differential Equations 3
EEEE-260 Semiconductor Devices 3
EEEE-282 Circuits II 3
EEEE-220 Digital Systems II 3
  Restricted Science Elective 3
Third Year
  Cooperative Education (fall) Co-op
MATH-381 Complex Variables 3
EEEE-374 EM Fields and Trans Lines 4
EEEE-353 Linear Systems 4
EEEE-381 Electronics I 3
  Concentration Course 3
Fourth Year
MATH-251 Probability and Statistics I 3
EEEE-420 Embedded Systems Design 3
EEEE-414 Control Systems Design 3
EEEE-482 Electronics II 4
  Free Elective 3
EEEE-484 Communication Systems (WI) 3
EEEE-483 Mechatronics 3
  Concentration Course 3
EEEE-602 Random Signals and Noise 3
EEEE-603 Matrix Methods in Electrical Engineering 3
EEEE-790 MS Thesis 3
Fifth Year
EEEE-497 Senior Design I 3
  Professional Electives 9
  Concentration Course 3
  Electives 9
EEEE-790 MS Thesis 5
EEEE-498 Senior Design 2 3
  Free Elective 3
Total Semester Credit Hours 150

Please see New General Education Curriculum–Liberal Arts and Sciences (LAS) for more information.

(WI) Refers to a writing intensive course within the major.

* Please see Wellness Education Requirement for more information.

Additional information

Accreditation

The BS in electrical engineering program is accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of ABET, http://www.abet.org.