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Glass MFA

Michael Rogers, Professor
David Schnuckel, Visiting Professor
Robin Cass, Professor
(585) 475-6114, sac@rit.edu

http://cias.rit.edu/schools/american-crafts/graduate-glass

Program overview

The MFA in glass is a two-year program of study that helps students develop their personal creative voice through intensive research, discussion, critique, and experimentation. Students are provided full access to a complete glass facility and individual studio space to strengthen their technique and to practice designing pieces that flourish their personal expression of the medium. Graduate studio courses, seminar courses, and in-depth critiques are offered in conjunction with thesis planning and implementation to provide students with a deep understanding of this personal craft. Students are exposed to a broad range of critical issues related to the conception and production of art, to inspire and provoke critical reflection and facilitate the development of a thesis exhibition and supporting documentation.

Curriculum

Glass, MFA degree, typical course sequence

Course Sem. Cr. Hrs.
First Year
CGLS-701 Glass Graduate Studio I 6
CGLS-702 Glass Graduate Studio II 6
ARTH-601 Forms of Inquiry 3
ARTH-605 Thinking About Making: The Practice of Art In A Global Society 3
CGEN-702 Crafts Graduate Seminar 3
  Open Graduate Electives 9
Second Year
CGLS-790 Glass Studio Thesis Initiation 6
CGLS-890 Glass Studio Thesis Resolution 9
CGEN-703 Thesis Implementation 3
CGEN-704 Thesis Review 3
  CIAS Studio Electives 6
  Open Graduate Electives 3
Total Semester Credit Hours 60

Admission requirements

To be considered for admission to the MFA program in glass, candidates must fulfill the following requirements:

  • Hold a baccalaureate degree in a field of arts, sciences, or education from a regionally accredited institution in the United States,
  • Submit official transcripts (in English) of all previously completed undergraduate and graduate course work (the undergraduate degree should include 50 semester hours in studio courses),
  • Demonstrate, through the quality of the undergraduate record and creative production, a genuine, professional potential, and
  • Complete a graduate application.
  • International students whose native language is not English must submit scores from the Test of English as a Foreign Language. Minimum scores of 550 (paper-based) or 80 (Internet-based) are required. Scores from the International English Language Testing System (IELTS) will be accepted in place of the TOEFL. A minimum score of 6.5 is required. Applicants coming from countries where the baccalaureate degree is not awarded for programs in the practice of art may be admitted to graduate study if the diploma or certificate received approximates the standards of the BFA, BA, or BS degrees, and if their academic records and portfolios indicate an ability to meet graduate standards.

Additional information

Studio Residency program

The School for American Crafts offers a Studio Residency program for students in ceramics, furniture design, glass, and metals and jewelry design. Residence positions are limited and are awarded after the review of all applicants’ portfolios, transcripts, and references. An interview is required. Accepted residents are required to register for one independent study credit during each semester of residence. 

Accepted residents are expected to be present in their assigned studio during class hours and to contribute up to 10 hours of work per week in the main studio. These work hours are coordinated and overseen by the faculty in the resident's discipline. In exchange, the school will provide workspace, access to facilities, and supportive instruction. The resident is invited to participate in the full range of studio activities.

Participants may be those seeking additional studio experience prior to undergraduate or graduate study, early career professionals, or teachers on leave who wish to work again in an academic studio environment. The faculty in each discipline will make decisions concerning appropriate candidates.

Inquiries should be made to the Studio Residency Program, School for American Crafts, College of Imaging Arts and Sciences, Rochester Institute of Technology, 73 Lomb Memorial Drive, Rochester, NY 14623-5603.

[arrow] Click to view program requirements in the Quarter Calendar

Quarter Curriculum - For Reference Only

Effective fall 2013, RIT will convert its academic calendar from quarters to semesters. The following content has been made available as reference only. Currently matriculated students who began their academic programs in quarters should consult their academic adviser for guidance and course selection.

Program overview

The MFA is a professional degree for practicing artists, craftspeople, or designers who desire to leave a lasting impression on their fields by devotion to their work and high standards of discipline and artistic ideals. The MFA is generally a two-year, full-time program that involves the presentation of a thesis. The thesis includes written documentation and the formal exhibition of a body of work.

This two-year program is structured on the basis of individual needs, interests, and professional preparation, as may be determined through individual/group discussions. A rapid series of exploratory works is developed during the first year, with emphasis on broadening technical and aesthetic understanding. The second year’s focus is on developing a body of work based on a sustained interest from the first year’s investigation. The final work must be supported by a written thesis, a high-quality portfolio, and an exhibition.

Curriculum

Semester conversion
Effective fall 2013, RIT will convert its academic calendar from quarters to semesters. Each program and its associated courses have been sent to the New York State Department of Education for approval of the semester plan. For reference, the following charts illustrate the typical course sequence for this program in both quarters and semesters. Students should consult their graduate program adviser with questions regarding planning and course selection.

Glass and glass sculpture, MFA degree, typical course sequence (quarters)

CourseQtr. Cr. Hrs.
First Year
2044-781 Graduate Glass I 9
2044-782 Graduate Glass II 9
2044-783 Graduate Glass III 9
2039-715 Thinking About Making 3
2037-785 Forms of Inquiry 2
2045-753 Crafts Graduate Seminar 2
  Humanities 12
  Electives/Minor 9
Second Year
2044-784 Graduate Glass IV 9
2045-751 Thesis Implementation 2
2044-890 Graduate Thesis 18
2045-752 Thesis Review 2
  Electives/Minor 9
Total Quarter Credit Hours
91

Glass, MFA degree, typical course sequence (semesters), effective fall 2013

CourseSem. Cr. Hrs.
First Year
CGLS-701 Glass Graduate Studio I 6
CGLS-702 Glass Graduate Studio II 6
ARTH-601 Forms of Inquiry 3
ARTH-605 Thinking About Making: The Practice of Art In A Global Society 3
CGEN-702 Crafts Graduate Seminar 3
  Open Electives 6
  Humanities 3
Second Year
CGLS-790 Glass Studio Thesis Initiation 6
CGLS-890 Glass Studio Thesis Resolution 9
CGEN-703 Research Implementation 3
  Studio Electives 6
  Open Electives 6
Total Semester Credit Hours 60

Admission requirements

To be considered for admission to the MFA program in glass and glass sculpture, candidates must fulfill the following requirements:

  • Hold a baccalaureate degree in a field of arts, sciences, or education from a regionally accredited institution in the United States,
  • Submit official transcripts (in English) of all previously completed undergraduate and graduate course work (the undergraduate degree should include 75 quarter credit hours [50 semester hours] in studio courses),
  • Demonstrate, through the quality of the undergraduate record and creative production, a genuine, professional potential, and
  • Complete a graduate application.
  • International students whose native language is not English must submit scores from the Test of English as a Foreign Language. Minimum scores of 550 (paper-based) or 80 (Internet-based) are required. Scores from the International English Language Testing System are accepted in place of the TOEFL. A minimum score of 6.5 is required. Applicants coming from countries where the baccalaureate degree is not awarded for programs in the practice of art may be admitted to graduate study if the diploma or certificate received approximates the standards of the BFA, BA, or BS degrees, and if their academic records and portfolios indicate an ability to meet graduate standards.

Additional information

Studio residence program

The School for American Crafts offers a craft residence program. Participants are accepted in the ceramics, glass, metals, and wood studios.

Residence positions are limited and are awarded after the review of all applicants’ portfolios, transcripts, and references. An interview is required. Accepted studio residents are required to register for at least two quarter credit hours of independent study during every quarter of residence. These two quarter credit hours can be taken as an audit, thus reducing the tuition cost to the resident.

Accepted residents are expected to be present in their assigned studio during class hours and to contribute up to 10 hours of work per week in the main studio. These work hours will be coordinated and overseen by the major faculty in the area. In exchange, the school will provide workspace, access to facilities, and supportive instruction. The resident is invited to participate in the full range of studio activities.

Participants may be those seeking additional studio experience prior to undergraduate or graduate study, early career professionals, or teachers on leave who wish to work again in an academic studio environment. The major faculty in the area will make decisions concerning appropriate candidates.

Inquiries should be made to the Residence Program, College of Imaging Arts and Sciences, School for American Crafts, Rochester Institute of Technology, 73 Lomb Memorial Drive, Rochester, NY 14623-5603.