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Glass BFA

Michael Rogers, Professor
Robin Cass, Professor
(585) 475-6114, sac@rit.edu

http://cias.rit.edu/schools/american-crafts/undergraduate-glass

Program overview

The glass major focuses on comprehensive instruction, exposing students to artistic perspectives and opinions. The curriculum fosters effective artistic expression by teaching both techniques and idea realization within the field of glass. Foundations courses assist students in finding their voice and empowering them to identify a personal definition for their work. Students study the fundamentals of blowing, casting, and cold-forming. Idea generation, development, execution, and presentation are also explored. Self-promotion, gallery interaction, and business practices are especially emphasized, allowing students to pursue careers immediately after graduation.

Curriculum

Glass, BFA degree, typical course sequence

Course Sem. Cr. Hrs.
First Year
FDTN-111, 122 Drawing I, II 6
FDTN-121, 122 2D Design I, II 6
FDTN-131, 132 3D Design I, II 6
  LAS Foundation 1: First Year Seminar† (SMTL) 3
  LAS Foundation 2: First Year Writing 3
  Studio Electives‡ 6
  YearOne 0
  Wellness Education* 0
Second Year
  LAS Perspective 1, 4 6
ARTH-135, 136 LAS Perspective 2, 3: Survey of Western Art and Architecture I, II 6
CGLS-201 Glass Sophomore I 6
CGEN-201 Crafts Drawing Practice 3
CGLS-202 Glass Sophomore II 6
CGEN-202 Crafts CADD Drawing 3
Third Year
CGLS-301, 302 Glass Junior I, II 12
  Art History Electives 6
  LAS Elective (SMTL) 3
  Free Electives 6
  LAS Immersion 1 3
Fourth Year
CGLS-501, 502 Glass Senior I, II 12
CGEN-501 Crafts Promotional Materials (WI) 3
CGEN-502 Crafts Business Practice 3
  LAS Immersion 2, 3 6
  Free Elective 3
  Studio Elective‡ 3
Total Semester Credit Hours 120

Please see New General Education Curriculum–Liberal Arts and Sciences (LAS) for more information.

(WI) Refers to a writing intensive course within the major.

(SMTL) Refers to science, math, technical literacy requirement.

* Please see Wellness Education Requirement for more information. Students completing bachelor's degrees are required to complete two Wellness courses.

† The First Year Seminar requirement is replaced by an LAS Elective for the 2014-15 academic year.

‡ Studio electives are courses designated by lab or studio contact hours in the course description.

Art history electives

Students are required to select three art history electives to broaden their understanding of the historical development of the arts. Art history electives include:

Course
ARTH-135 Survey of Western Art and Architecture I*
ARTH-136 Survey of Western Art and Architecture II*
ARTH-221 Contemporary Design Issues
ARTH-311 Art of Italy: 1250-1400
ARTH-312 Art of Italy: 1600-1750
ARTH-317 Art Florence and Rome: 15th Century
ARTH-318 Art Florence and Rome: 16th Century
ARTH-345 History to Architecture Interior and Furniture I†
ARTH-346 History to Architecture Interior and Furniture II†
ARTH-364 Art of Paris
ARTH-366 18th, 19th Century Art
ARTH-368 20th Century Art: 1900-1950
ARTH-369 20th Century Art: Since 1950
ARTH-373 Art of the Last Decade
ARTH-378 Baroque Painting in Flanders
ARTH-379 Renaissance Painting in Flanders
ARTH-392 Theory and Criticism of 20th Century
ARTH-457 Art and Activism
ARTH-521 The Image
ARTH-541 Art and Architecture of Ancient Rome
ARTH-544 Illuminated Manuscripts
ARTH-550 Topics in Art History
ARTH-554 Late Medieval Art
ARTH-558 The Gothic Revival
ARTH-561 Latin American Art
ARTH-566 Early Medieval Art
ARTH-568 Art and Technology: Machine Aesthetic Cyborg
ARTH-572 Art of the Americas
ARTH-573 Conceptual Art
ARTH-574 Dada and Surrealism
ARTH-576 Modernism and Realism
ARTH-577 Displaying Gender
ARTH-578 Edvard Munch
ARTH-581 Russian Realist Art
ARTH-582 Medieval Craft
ARTH-583 Installation Art
ARTH-584 Scandinavian Modernism
ARTH-586 Studies in Material Culture
ARTH-587 The Gothic Cathedral
ARTH-588 Symbols and Symbol-Making

* This course is required for students in majors in the schools of American Crafts, Art, Design, and Photographic Arts and Sciences (BFA programs only).

† This course is required for students majoring in interior design and furniture design.

Additional information

Studio Residency program

The School for American Crafts offers a Studio Residency program for students in ceramics, furniture design, glass, and metals and jewelry design. Residence positions are limited and are awarded after the review of all applicants’ portfolios, transcripts, and references. An interview is required. Accepted residents are required to register for one independent study credit during each semester of residence.

Accepted residents are expected to be present in their assigned studio during class hours and to contribute up to 10 hours of work per week in the main studio. These work hours are coordinated and overseen by the faculty in the resident's discipline. In exchange, the school will provide workspace, access to facilities, and supportive instruction. The resident is invited to participate in the full range of studio activities.

Participants may be those seeking additional studio experience prior to undergraduate or graduate study, early career professionals, or teachers on leave who wish to work again in an academic studio environment. The faculty in each discipline make decisions concerning appropriate candidates.

Inquiries should be made to the Studio Residency Program, School for American Crafts, College of Imaging Arts and Sciences, Rochester Institute of Technology, 73 Lomb Memorial Drive, Rochester, NY 14623-5603.

[arrow] Click to view program requirements in the Quarter Calendar

Quarter Curriculum - For Reference Only

Effective fall 2013, RIT will convert its academic calendar from quarters to semesters. The following content has been made available as reference only. Currently matriculated students who began their academic programs in quarters should consult their academic adviser for guidance and course selection.

Program overview

As an internationally recognized school that merges art with craft, the School for American Crafts is a leader in crafts education. Our programs provide an educational experience that balances technical expertise with aesthetic expression in the creative and practical understanding of wood, metal, clay, and glass.

Our educational objectives seek to stimulate creative imagination and technical invention, develop knowledge of process and command of skills, and foster appreciation not only of the crafts but also the related arts. The programs strive to inspire the student to seek continual improvement through analysis and self-evaluation.

Curriculum

Semester conversion
Effective fall 2013, RIT will convert its academic calendar from quarters to semesters. Each program and its associated courses have been sent to the New York State Department of Education for approval of the semester plan. For reference, the following charts illustrate the typical course sequence for this program in both quarters and semesters. Students should consult their academic advisers with questions regarding planning and course selection.

Glass, BFA degree, typical course sequence (quarters)

CourseQtr. Cr. Hrs.
First Year
  Freshman Elective 6
2013-211, 212, 213 Drawing I, II, III 9
2013-231, 232, 233 2D Design I, II, III 9
2013-241, 242, 243 3D Design I, II, III 9
  Open Elective 3
  Liberal Arts* 12
1720-050, 052 First-Year Enrichment 2
  Wellness Education† 0
Second Year‡
2039-225, 226, 227 Survey of Western Art and Architecture I, II, III 9
2041-301, 302, 303 Materials and Processes Glass, Sophomore 18
2045-311 Concept Drawing 3
2045-312 Craft Technical Drawing 3
2045-xxx Design Processes 3
  Wellness Education† 0
  Liberal Arts* 12
Third Year
2040-401, 402, 403 Materials and Processes Glass, Junior 18
  Art History Electives§ 9
  Open Electives 9-12
  Liberal Arts* 12
Fourth Year
2041-501, 502, 503 Materials and Processes Glass, Senior 18
2045-511 Planning a Career in the Crafts 3
2045-512 Crafts Promotional Package 3
2045-513 Operating a Business in the Crafts 3
  Open Electives 9-12
Total Quarter Credit Hours 188

* Please see Liberal Arts General Education Requirements for more information.

† Please see Wellness Education Requirement for more information.

‡ Upon completion of second year, the associate in applied science degree is awarded.

§ Please refer to the list of art history electives.

Glass, BFA degree, typical course sequence (semesters), effective fall 2013

CourseSem. Cr. Hrs.
First Year
  LAS Foundation 1: First-Year Seminar (SMTL) 3
FDTN-111 Drawing I 3
FDTN-121 2D Design I 3
FDTN-131 3D Design I 3
ENGL-150 LAS Foundation 2: Writing Seminar 3
  Studio Electives† 6
FDTN-112 Drawing II 3
FDTN-141 4D Design 3
FDTN-132 3D Design II 3
Second Year
  LAS Perspective 1, 4 6
ARTH-135 LAS Perspective 2: Survey of Western Art and Architecture I 3
CGLS-201 Glass Sophomore I 6
CGEN-201 Crafts Drawing Practice 3
ARTH-136 LAS Perspective 3: Survey of Western Art and Architecture II 3
CGLS-202 Glass Sophomore II 6
CGEN-202 Crafts CADD Drawing 3
Third Year
  LAS Elective (SMTL) 3
CGLS-301 Glass Junior I 6
  Art History Electives 6
  Free Electives 6
  LAS Immersion 1 3
CGLS-302   Glass Junior II 6
Fourth Year
  LAS Immersion 2, 3 6
CGLS-501 Glass Senior I 6
CGEN-501 Crafts Promotional Materials (WI) 3
  Open Elective 3
CGLS-502 Glass Senior II 6
CGEN-502 Crafts Business Practice 3
  Studio Elective† 3
Total Semester Credit Hours 120

Please see New General Education Curriculum–Liberal Arts and Sciences (LAS) for more information.

(WI) Refers to a writing intensive course within the major.

(SMTL) Refers to science, math, technical literacy requirement.

* Please see Wellness Education Requirement for more information.

† Studio electives are courses designated by lab or studio contact hours in the course description.

Art history electives

Students are required to select three art history electives to broaden their understanding of the historical development of the arts. Art history electives include:

2039-300 History of Design
2039-306 Architecture Interior and Furniture Design I †
2039-307 Architecture Interior and Furniture Design II †
2039-308 Architecture Interior and Furniture Design III †
2039-310 History of Crafts
2039-315 Pre-Columbian Art
2039-316 Florence and Rome 1400-1470
2039-317 Florence and Rome 1470-1520
2039-318 Florence and Rome 1520-1590
2039-320 History of Art Criticism
2039-330 Philosophy in Art
2039-340 Symbols and Symbol Making
2039-355 Latin American Art
2039-360 18th and 19th Century Art
2039-368 Scandinavian Modernism
2039-375 20th Century Art Since 1950
2039-376 Renaissance Painting in Flanders
2039-385 Installation Art
2039-390 Native American Art and Culture
2039-395 Theory and Criticism of 20th Century Art
2039-410 The Art of Art History
2039-415 Thinking About Making
2039-425 Public Art/Public Spaces
2039-430 Dada and Surrealism
2039-433 What Is Post Modernism?
2039-435 Art of the Last Decade
2039-438 Body in Art
2039-440 Conceptual Art
2039-443 Art and Technology: From the Machine Aesthetic to the Cyborg Age
2039-452 Art and Activism
2039-459 Art Central Italy 1250-1400
2039-469 Baroque Rome

† Required for interior design majors and School for American Crafts wood majors.

Additional information

Crafts residency program

The School for American Crafts offers a crafts residence program for participants accepted in the ceramics and ceramic sculpture, glass, metalcrafts and jewelry, and woodworking and furniture design disciplines. Residence positions are limited and will be awarded based on the review of an application, which consists of a portfolio, transcripts, and references. An interview also is required. Accepted studio residents are required to register for at least two credits of independent study during every quarter of residence. These two credits can be taken as an audit, thus reducing the tuition cost to the resident.

Accepted residents are expected to attend their major studio courses during class hours and to contribute up to 10 hours of work per week in the major studio. These work hours will be coordinated and overseen by the faculty in the program area. In exchange, the school will provide workspace, access to facilities, and supportive instruction. The residents are invited to participate in the full range of studio activities.

Residence program participants may be individuals seeking additional studio experience prior to undergraduate or graduate study, early career professionals, or teachers on leave who wish to work in an academic studio environment. The faculty in each program area will make decisions concerning appropriate candidates.