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Information Technology BS

Stephen Zilora, Chair
(585) 475-7645, Steve.Zilora@rit.edu

http://it.rit.edu/

Program overview

The role of an IT professional, or information technologist, is diverse and multifaceted. To develop and maintain truly effective systems, information technologists need core competencies in four essential areas: Web and mobile application development and design; database, programming, and application development; secure computer networking and system administration; and technology integration and deployment in user communities, including needs assessment, user-centered design, and ongoing support.

The fourth competency area, bringing in the human element, is the defining expertise for information technology professionals. To design and develop the best possible systems, IT professionals must see the world through the users’ eyes and learn what user communities need in order to effectively contribute to an organization's goals and success. This requires skills in information gathering, user-centered design, and effective deployment practices for devices ranging from wearable technology to the traditional desktop, as well as strong communication and people skills.

Curriculum

The core competencies provide a foundation for developing greater depth in specialized concentration areas. Students choose one of the following concentrations: enterprise Web application development, enterprise database development, mobile application development, or enterprise application development. In addition, with department permission, students can create a special-topics sequence.

Cooperative education

The major requires students to complete two blocks of cooperative education. Students may begin their co-op requirement after completing their seocnd year of study.

Information technology, BS degree, typical course sequence

Course Sem. Cr. Hrs.
First Year
ISTE-120 Computer Problem Solving: Information Domain I 4
ISTE-190 Foundations of Modern Information Processing 3
MATH-131 LAS Perspective 7A: Discrete Mathematics 4
  LAS Foundation 1: First Year Seminar† 3
  LAS Perspective 1, 2 6
ISTE-121 Computer Problem Solving: Information Domain II 4
ISTE-140 Web I 3
MATH-161 LAS Perspective 7B: Applied Calculus 4
ISTE-110 Ethics in Computing (WI) 3
  YearOne 0
  Wellness Education* 0
Second Year
ISTE-230 Introduction to Database and Data Modeling 3
ISTE-240 Web II 3
ISTE-260 Designing the User Experience 3
STAT-145 Introduction to Statistics I 3
  LAS Perspective 3, 4 6
SWEN-383 Software Design Principles and Patterns 3
STAT-146 Introduction to Statistics II 4
ISTE-340 Client Programming 3
NSSA-290 Networking Essentials for Developers 3
  Cooperative Education (summer) Co-op
Third Year
ISTE-341 Server Programming 3
ISTE-330 Database Connectivity and Access 3
  LAS Perspective 5‡ 4
  Free Electives 6
ISTE-270 Data Exploration and Knowledge Discovery 3
ISTE-430 Information Requirements Modeling 3
  ISTE Concentration Courses 6
  LAS Immersion 1 3
  Cooperative Education (summer) Co-op
Fourth Year
ISTE-500, 501 Senior Development Project I, (WI), II 6
  Concentration Courses 6
  LAS Immersion 2, 3 6
  LAS Perspective 6 3
  Free Electives 6
  LAS Elective 3
Total Semester Credit Hours 126

Please see New General Education Curriculum–Liberal Arts and Sciences (LAS) for more information.

(WI) Refers to a writing intensive course within the major.

* Please see Wellness Education Requirement for more information. Students completing bachelor's degrees are required to complete two Wellness courses.

† The First Year Seminar requirement is replaced by an LAS Elective for the 2014-15 academic year.

‡ Students will satisfy this requirement by taking either a 3 or 4 credit hour lab science course. If a science course consists of separate lecture and laboratory sections, students must take both the lecture and the lab portions to fulfill the requirement.

§ Students will satisfy this requirement by selecting one of the following four credit options: General Biology (BIOL-101) and General Biology Lab (BIOL-103); General and Analytical Chemistry (CHMG-141) and General and Analytical Chemistry (CHMG-145); or College Physics (PHYS-111).

[arrow] Click to view program requirements in the Quarter Calendar

Quarter Curriculum - For Reference Only

Effective fall 2013, RIT will convert its academic calendar from quarters to semesters. The following content has been made available as reference only. Currently matriculated students who began their academic programs in quarters should consult their academic adviser for guidance and course selection.

Program overview

The role of an IT professional, or information technologist, is diverse and multifaceted. To develop and maintain truly effective systems, information technologists need core competencies in four essential areas: Web design/development and interactive media; database, programming, and application development; networking and system administration, which includes the design, deployment, and security of computing infrastructure; and technology integration and deployment in user communities, including needs assessment, user-centered design, technology transfer, and ongoing support.

The fourth competency area is the defining expertise for information technology professionals. To design and develop the best possible systems, IT professionals must see the world through the users’ eyes and learn about what user communities need to contribute to organizational goals and success. This requires skills in information gathering, user-centered design, and effective deployment practices in organizations with differing user environments and cultures, as well as strong communication and people skills.

Accreditation

The BS in information technology is accredited by the Computing Accreditation Commission of ABET, http://www.abet.org.

Curriculum

The core competencies provide a foundation for developing greater depth in specialized concentration areas. Students will choose two concentrations from the following: Web development, database technology, interactive multimedia development, network and system administration, learning and performance technology, medical informatics, and advanced application development. In addition, with department permission, students can create a special-topics sequence for one of their two concentrations. Most students select advanced technical courses for developing a deep competency in one or two of the specialization areas. Other students choose a broader path to prepare for general IT practitioner jobs, which are prevalent in virtually every enterprise.

Cooperative education

The program requires students to complete three quarters of cooperative education. Students may begin their co-op requirement after completing all second-year academic requirements. A typical schedule might include cooperative education in the summer quarter following the second year and in the spring and summer quarters of the third year.

Semester conversion
Effective fall 2013, RIT will convert its academic calendar from quarters to semesters. Each program and its associated courses have been sent to the New York State Department of Education for approval of the semester plan. For reference, the following charts illustrate the typical course sequence for this program in both quarters and semesters. Students should consult their academic advisers with questions regarding planning and course selection.

Information technology, BS degree, typical course sequence (quarters)

CourseQtr. Cr. Hrs.
First Year
4002-201 Freshman Seminar 1
4002-320 Introduction to Multimedia: The Internet and the Web 4
4002-217, 218, 219 Programming for Information Technology I, II, III 12
4050-220 Cyber Self-Defense 4
1016-205, 206 Discrete Math for Technologists I, II 8
  Liberal Arts* 12
1105-051, 052 First-Year Enrichment 2
  Wellness Education† 0
Second Year
4050-350 Computer System Fundamentals 4
4050-351 Network Fundamentals 4
4002-331 Interactive Programming 4
4002-360 Introduction to Database and Data Modeling 4
4002-425 HCI 1: Human Factors 4
1016-319 Data Analysis I 4
  Liberal Arts* 12
  Lab Science Elective 8
  Free Elective 4
Third and Fourth Year
  Cooperative Education§ Co-op
4002-455 Needs Assessment 4
4002-426 HCI 2: Interface Design and Development 4
4002-460 Technology Transfer 4
  IT Concentration Courses‡ 24
1016-320 Data Analysis II 4
  Liberal Arts* 12
  Free Electives 20
  General Education Electives 18
Total Quarter Credit Hours 181

* Please see Liberal Arts General Education Requirements for more information.

† Please see Wellness Education Requirement for more information.

‡ Two three-course concentrations are required. Concentrations include Web development, interactive multimedia development, network and system administration, database, learning and performance technology, advanced application development, and special topics. A six-course Web-database integration concentration also is available.

§ Three quarters of cooperatuve education is required after the completition of the second year.Information technology, BS degree, typical course sequence (semesters), effective fall 2013

Information technology, BS degree, typical course sequence (semesters), effective fall 2013

CourseSem. Cr. Hrs.
First Year
ISTE-120 Computer Problem Solving: Information Domain I 4
ISTE-190 Foundations of Modern Information Processing 3
MATH-131 LAS Perspective 7A: Discrete Mathematics 4
  LAS Foundation 1: First Year Seminar 3
  LAS Perspective 2, 3 6
ISTE-121 Computer Problem Solving: Information Domain II 4
ISTE-140 Web I 3
MATH-161 LAS Perspective 7B: Applied Calculus 4
ISTE-110 Ethics in Computing (WI) 3
  Wellness Education* 0
Second Year
ISTE-230 Introduction to Database and Data Modeling 3
ISTE-240 Web II 3
ISTE-260 Designing the User Experience 3
STAT-145 Introduction to Statistics I 3
  LAS Perspective 4, 6 6
ISTE-270 Data Exploration and Knowledge Discovery 3
ISTE-330 Database Connectivity and Access 3
ISTE-340 Client Programming 3
NSSA-290 Networking Essentials for Developers 3
  Cooperative Education (summer) Co-op
Third Year
ISTE-341 Server Programming 3
ISTE-430 Information Requirements Modeling  3
STAT-146 Introduction to Statistics II 4
SWEN-383 Software Design Principles and Patterns 3
  Free Electives 6
  LAS Perspective 1 3
ISTE-490 Futuring 3
  ISTE Concentration Course 3
  LAS Immersion 1 3
  Cooperative Education (summer) Co-op
Fourth Year
ISTE-500 Senior Development Project I (WI) 3
  ISTE Concentration Courses 6
  LAS Immersion 2, 3 6
  LAS Perspective 5† 4
  Free Electives 6
ISTE-501 Senior Development Project II 3
  LAS Elective 3
Total Semester Credit Hours 126

Please see New General Education Curriculum–Liberal Arts and Sciences (LAS) for more information.

(WI) Refers to a writing intensive course within the major.

* Please see Wellness Education Requirement for more information.

† Students will satify this requirement by taking either a 3 or 4 credit hour lab science course. If a science course consists of separate lecture and laboratory sections, students must take both the lecture and the lab portions to fulfill the requirement.

§ Students will satisfy this requirement by selecting one of the following four credit options: General Biology (BIOL-101) and General Biology Lab (BIOL-103); General and Analytical Chemistry (CHMG-141) and General and Analytical Chemistry (CHMG-145); or College Physics (PHYS-111).

Additional information

Part-time study

The BS degree in information technology may be completed on a part-time basis, with courses available during the day and in the evening to accommodate those who work. The typical evening student requires approximately 23 quarters for a BS degree (this assumes no previous course work). Students with a strong associate degree may be able to complete the degree requirements in 12 quarters.