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International and Global Studies (formerly International Studies) BS

Semester Requirements

Jason Younker, Department Chair
(585) 475-5549, jtygla@rit.edu

http://www.rit.edu/cla/sociology/internationalstudies

Program overview

The impact of global change is dramatic and far-reaching, altering the dynamics of everyday life on a planetary scale. The international and global studies major assesses and analyzes salient issues including consumer capitalism, media culture, forms of communication, economic development, gender and health, migration, border wars, political violence, sustainable futures, and human security.

Curriculum

The major offers a range of courses from anthropology, economics, fine arts, history, international business, modern language and culture studies, political science, public policy, and sociology. The program focuses on the dynamic interplay of international and supranational processes, an approach that features an integrated analysis of globalization via the dynamics of cultural, technological, media, business, monetary, diplomatic, and information exchange. Through the holistic and humanistic analysis of globalization, students consider the consequences of global processes for human rights, ethnic conflict, health, environmental sustainability, economic justice, violence and human security, and the predicaments of democracy and civil society.

Field specializations

The major offers specialization options that allow students to choose a regional focus (Africa, Asia, Europe, Latin America, the Middle East, or Indigenous Studies) or a topical focus (sustainable futures, global justice, peace and conflict studies, international business, or transnational gender studies).

Foreign language

The major requires students to study a foreign language. RIT offers instruction in Arabic, Chinese, French, German, Italian, Japanese, Portuguese, Russian, and Spanish. Language certification also is available for students who are proficient in a language other than English, including ASL.

International experience

Students are encouraged to gain a gloabl perspective through an international experience. This can include study abroad or an international co-op or internship. Study abroad programs are available in any part of the world, or students can study at one of RIT's global campuses in Croatia, Dubai, or Kosovo. Students may also fullfil the international reuirement by completing an internship or co-op at an international company.

International and global studies, BS degree, typical course sequence (semesters), effective fall 2013

Course Sem. Cr. Hrs.
First Year
INGS-101 Global Studies 3
ANTH-210 Culture and Globalization 3
  LAS Foundation 1: First Year Seminar† 3
  LAS Foundation 2: First Year Writing 3
  LAS Perspective 1, 7A 6
POLS-110 LAS Perspective 3: Introduction to International Relations 3
  LAS Elective 3
  Modern Language (beginning level) 1, 2‡ 6
  Wellness Education* 0
Second Year
POLS-330 Human Rights in Global Perspective 3
  Modern Language (intermediate level) 1, 2‡ 6
SOCI-302 Qualitative Research 3
  Field Specialization Elective 3
  Globalization Concentration Electives 6
STAT-145 LAS Perspective 7B: Introduction to Statistics I 3
ECON-101 LAS Perspective 4: Principles of Microeconomics 3
  LAS Immersion 1 3
Choose one of the following:  
   INGS-597    Study Abroad§  
   INGS-598    Internship§  
Third Year
ECON-449 Comparative Economic Systems 3
  Modern Language (advanced level) 1‡ 3
  Globalization Concentration Elective 3
  Field Specialization Electives 6
  Advanced Study Course 3
ISTE-105 Web Foundations 3
  LAS Immersion 2, 3 6
  LAS Perspective 5 3
Fourth Year
INGS-501 Capstone Seminar (WI) 3
  Field Specialization Elective 3
  Advanced Study Course 3
  LAS Perspectives 2, 6 6
  LAS Electives 9
  Free Electives 6
Total Semester Credit Hours 120

Please see New General Education Curriculum–Liberal Arts and Sciences (LAS) for more information.

(WI) Refers to a writing intensive course within the major.

* Please see Wellness Education Requirement for more information. Students completing bachelor's degrees are required to complete two Wellness courses.
† The First Year Seminar requirement is replaced by an LAS Elective for the 2013-14 academic year.

‡ Modern language: Students without prior proficiency in a foreign language should take the beginning level language sequence as prerequisite(s) for the intermediate level in the LAS electives.

§ After the first year, students are required to complete an international experience by choosing either a study abroad experience or an internship or co-op. The requirement may be completed during the summer or during the academic year.

 

Additional information

Faculty

Faculty members have distinguished records of research in Latin America, the Caribbean, China, Japan, Korea, West and North Africa, the Middle East, Native North America, and Europe. A number have teaching experience abroad; collaborate with transnational teams on issues of human trafficking, genocide, political violence, environmental sustainability, and global justice; and many have achieved international recognition through prestigious grants, fellowships, and publications.

Career opportunities

Students are well-prepared to pursue careers in government, diplomatic or security service, international business, and not-for-profit initiatives. Graduates also are prepared competitive graduate programs in fields as diverse as international law, international development, global education, administration, public policy, and the social sciences.

[arrow] Click to view program requirements in the Quarter Calendar

Quarter Curriculum - For Reference Only

Effective fall 2013, RIT will convert its academic calendar from quarters to semesters. The following content has been made available as reference only. Currently matriculated students who began their academic programs in quarters should consult their academic adviser for guidance and course selection.

Program overview

The bachelor of science in international studies highlights interdisciplinary approaches to the analysis of global processes, such as the impact of globalization on local communities, regions, and environments and how people in different parts of the world can promote equitable and sustainable development in the future. The program seeks to educate a new generation of global citizens who will acquire the expertise to assess and analyze salient issues such as flexible capitalism, consumer culture, economic opportunities, international migration, international politics, social change, violence, and terrorism. The program prepares graduates for careers that demand an understanding of the social, economic, political, humanitarian, and environmental issues that are central to globalization.

Curriculum

The program offers a range of courses that include political science, economics, anthropology, international business, public policy, sociology, history, and modern language and culture studies. This diversity offers a solid education in international studies, but also introduces students to cutting-edge knowledge and expertise in global issues and world problems that will boost career opportunities.

A unique aspect of the program is the wide choice of specialization options. Students may choose a specific geographical or cultural focus for their studies–for example, Africa, Asia, Europe, Latin America, the Middle East or Indigenous Studies–or they may opt to explore topical specialties such as sustainable futures; global justice, peace, and conflict studies; international business; or transnational gender studies. A field specialization allows students to gain in-depth knowledge of the social, political, and cultural dimensions of a particular part of the world and also to develop career expertise. Modern language study provides critical inter-cultural communication skills necessary for success in any career.

International experience

The program encourages students to participate in an international experience, which includes study abroad opportunities and/or internships. Students have lived and studied in diverse locations such as Japan, Australia, Senegal, France, Denmark, Italy, Spain, Brazil, and Costa Rica, to name a few. A number of students have worked as interns under the supervision of human rights lawyers for the New York State Division of Human Rights in Rochester and for the United Nations Association of Rochester.

Semester conversion
Effective fall 2013, RIT will convert its academic calendar from quarters to semesters. Each program and its associated courses have been sent to the New York State Department of Education for approval of the semester plan. For reference, the following charts illustrate the typical course sequence for this program in both quarters and semesters. Students should consult their academic advisers with questions regarding planning and course selection.

Program title change
Effective fall 2013, the international studies program will be renamed international and global studies. This change will not affect currently matriculated students.

International studies, BS degree, typical course sequence (quarters)

CourseQtr. Cr. Hrs.
First Year
  Liberal Arts* 12
  Mathematics and Science Requirement‡ 7-8
  Foreign Language Requirement 12
0524-210 Global Studies 4
0513-214 Introduction to International Relations 4
0507-441 Modern U.S. Foreign Relations 4
0510-440 Cultures in Globalization 4
1720-050, 052 Discovery and Pathways 2
  Wellness Education† 0
Second Year
Choose one of the following courses:  4
   0511-449    Comparative Economic Systems  
   0511-454    International Trade and Finance  
  Liberal Arts* 12
  Globalization Core Elective 4
1016-319, 320 Data Analysis I and II 10
  Foreign Language Requirement 12
4002-206 Web Foundations 4
  Wellness Education† 0
Third Year
  International Studies Track 8
  Foreign Language Requirement 12
0515-406 Qualitative Methods 4
  Liberal Arts* 12
  Science Requirement‡ 3
  Open Electives 8
  International Experience 0
Fourth Year
  International Studies Track 8
0524-501 Capstone Seminar 4
  Liberal Arts* 16
  Open Electives 12
Total Quarter Credit Hours 180 required

* Please see Liberal Arts General Education Requirements for more information.

† Please see Wellness Education Requirement for more information.

‡ Please see Mathematics and Science General Education Curriculum.

International and global studies, BS degree, typical course sequence (semesters), effective fall 2013

CourseSem. Cr. Hrs.
First Year
INGS-101 Global Studies 3
ANTH-210 Culture and Globalization 3
  LAS Foundation 1: First-Year Seminar 3
ENGL-150 LAS Foundation 2: Writing Seminar 3
  LAS Perspective 1 3
ANTH-102 LAS Perspective 3: Cultural Anthropology 3
POLS-101 Introduction to International Relations 3
MATH-100 LAS Perspective 7A: College Algebra 3
  LAS Electives 3
  Modern Language (beginning level) 1, 2† 6
  Wellness Education* 0
Second Year
POLS-330 Human Rights in Global Perspective 3
  Modern Language (intermediate level) 1, 2† 6
SOCI-302 Qualitative Research 3
  Field Specialization Elective 3
  Globalization Concentration Electives 6
STAT-145 LAS Perspectives 7B: Introduction to Statistics I 3
ECON-101 LAS Perspective 4: Principles of Microeconomics 3
  LAS Immersion 1 3
Choose one of the following:  
   INGS-597    Study Abroad‡  
   INGS-598    Internship‡  
Third Year
ECON-449 Comparative Economic Systems 3
MLxx-401 Modern Language (advanced level) 1† 3
  Globalization Concentration Elective 3
  Field Specialization Electives 6
  Advanced Study Option 1 3
ISTE-105 Web Foundations 3
  LAS Immersion 2 (WI), 3 6
  LAS Perspective 5 3
Fourth Year
INGS-501 Capstone Seminar (WI) 3
  Field Specialization Elective 3
  Advanced Study Option 2 3
  LAS Perspective 2, 6 6
  LAS Electives 9
  Free Electives 6
Total Semester Credit Hours 120

Please see New General Education Curriculum–Liberal Arts and Sciences (LAS) for more information.

(WI) Refers to a writing intensive course within the major.

* Please see Wellness Education Requirement for more information.

† Modern language: Students without prior proficiency in a foreign language should take the beginning level language sequence as prerequisite(s) for the intermediate level in the LAS electives.

‡ After the first year, students are required to complete an international experience by choosing either a study abroad experience or an internship or co-op. The requirement may be completed during the summer or during the academic year.

Additional information

Career opportunities

Students are prepared for positions in state and federal agencies, private enterprise, and various non-profit organizations. In addition, students are also well-prepared for graduate studies in fields such as international law, international development, public policy, and social sciences.